Reflections

Reflections are a tribute to the memories of lost friends and family. To add a Reflection, visit the page of the person listed on the website and click the Add Reflection link.

2022

Glyn P.

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December 28, 2022

I ordered this bracelet because I go to the Virginia Military Institute. Here we understand sacrifice and Capt. Luke Wullenwaber understood that as well. In order to motivate myself every day to be a better cadet, person, and hopefully future soldier I can look down at that bracelet and be proud of what I do.
-Glyn

Marilyn N.

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September 1, 2022

I have a few bracelets in support of our veterans. I just happened to notice Lt.Col. David Hatcher's on my desk. so I looked him up, only to find that he has passed away. these bracelets are not souvenirs, they are the heart and soul of our veterans. I had a brother-in-law, who, after coming home, died of agent orange. I know that my condolences are coming very late, however, I wanted to let the family know that i am honored to wear his bracelet and to thank them.

EHLERS

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August 12, 2022

I was a fraternity brother of Dave and we also roomed together at the fraternity, Beta Sigma Psi, at the University of Illinois. He was always larger than life and I respected him immensely. I hope that his spirit has found peace and his heavenly home.

Jo Ann Galvan

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August 2, 2022

I have a bracelet and would love to get the dog tag. SFC Richard M. Garcia is my Dad.

LORI

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July 23, 2022

I wore a POW bracelet with his name and the date he was reported MIA on my arm for so many years. I thought it was a sign that we were connected because the date he was reported missing was my 10th birthday, 8/14/1966.

GM2

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July 9, 2022

I never met you, But I served on the ship named after you and one we De-Commissioned. I also went to the modern version of where you served at the same rank and pretty much the same age you were. I made it a point to pass on your legacy and what you did for your boat crew. I wear your name on my wrist everyday and on my kevlar when I work with it. You gave all to save your team and it hasn't been forgotten. The crew that was on your ship will never forget what you sacrificed, and neither will I. RIP GMG2, we have the watch.

Schuuuuuuuuuuman

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June 16, 2022

He was my drill instructor and changed my life. I will always remember and honor my brother!!!!

Alexander

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June 11, 2022

Drake was in my unit in Afghanistan, and was a huge pain in the butt in the best way. His smile could light up a room, and was always squared away. He's been greatly missed by everyone who knew him and served with him, and I just don't want him to be forgotten.

Nick

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June 8, 2022

I never got to meet Scotty but I count him as my godfather. He switched places with my father and went to Beirut. If it wasn't for him I wouldn't be here today. My youngest son's middle name is Scott after him

Nash

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June 2, 2022

I knew GySgt. Baum for just a short time while we were deployed to Iraq. We would see each other in the HQ tent during watch turnover. We would have coffee and he would talk with me about his kids and his fishing boat. He would talk about how much he was looking forward to his retirement from the Marine Corps and spending more time with his family. His example has influenced the way I approach my time with my family over the years. I am glad to have had the privilege to know GySgt Baum, even for just a short time.

Nickelbugs

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May 30, 2022

SFC Scott R. Smith my uncle was one of the greatest people that I’ve ever met, I’ve taken after him in everything and everything I do is for him, I would do anything to have him back

Linda

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May 30, 2022

I wore Lt Barton Creed bracelet for years in the early 70’s. My dad served 2 tours in Vietnam, I was raised on a Marine Base during this war, I wore this bracelet with admiration and prayers that this man would come home safe to his family. I still have this bracelet.

airborne0801

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May 30, 2022

Was a great young man and a great soldier as well as one of my recruits - miss you.

Sally

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May 23, 2022

I'm 67 years old and I still keep CDR David Greiling's bracelet from the '70s. The first one broke and I ordered a replacement. Rumor had it that if it broke, the name on the bracelet was deceased. Tonight I researched his name and found that David had been a POW and died. I teared up a bit, but then I remembered his family and friends. My thoughts are with them.

Trilid

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May 17, 2022

True Friend and Brother. Miss you everyday

Cindy

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April 27, 2022

You will always be remembered and never forgotten❤️

Dana Adkins

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April 13, 2022

My mother who wore his bracelet, and still does from time to time, is now 80. She wants to return the bracelet to his family and would like to meet someone from his family. If you are an immediate family member of Col Begley's, please email rob1@memorialbracelets.com to get into contact with us.

Mayse

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April 10, 2022

I went to Boot Camp at Parris Island with Tingley. We were in the same platoon, Platoon 1008. Then we went to ITS (Infantry Training School at Camp Geiger NC. After that we split up and were at different duty stations. Steve was with 1st Bn 8th Marines, I was with 2nd Battalion 6th Marines out of Camp Lejeune.

The day after the bombing my unit flew to Beirut where I learned that Steve didn't make it. I think about him all the time. He was the all-American guy. Always funny and had a wild side!

While we were in ITS he snuck off base to hit the town! I thought to myself... wow! That is some crazy shit! The Marine Corps to those of you that do not understand what strict actually means. It was an out there thing to do.
I miss you Tingley. Semper Fi, Tony Mayse

Gina

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March 26, 2022

Prayers for you

SFC Retired

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March 7, 2022

I was his Platoon Sergeant in Afghanistan. He was the second soldier in the platoon that was killed in action that July and 10 more in the platoon were battle injured throughout the deployment.

DDM

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February 28, 2022

In Heaven

MEL

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February 3, 2022

He was my team leader in Iraq, our first deployment in Iraq. He is missed everyday.

Tony

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January 1, 2022

Let us not forget those whom we have lost in this final operation of OEF.

2021

Lisa

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December 9, 2021

She was in tower two when the second plane hit. She was a bank analyst for Keefe, Bruyette & Woods on the 89th floor. She was a beautiful, bright, fun-loving young woman who kept us in laughter and happy tears from her stories and dreams.

D. Cyr

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December 7, 2021

A couple of weeks we were on a mission and Dennis learned something new, a useless fact, I wish I could remember what it was, nonetheless, upon learning it, in his OK Twang he exclaimed, "Well now I have heard everything!" We all laughed.

Well a couple days before the ambushed we were on another mission and we came across a dwelling which had pink chicks. Dennis exclaimed, "SGT Cyr, can you take a picture of those pink chickens, so i can show my dad! He won't believe me that they had pink chickens, Now I've seen everything!" It was a hilarious moment in time and as I took the picture I asked, now that you've heard and seen everything what are you going to do next?!?!?" We all had a good laugh. I love and miss you my brother, till Valhalla!!

Brian G.

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December 1, 2021

I ordered this bracelet because my friend Chris Howick died in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in May 2006. I've known him since 1995 when we used to crew blackhawk helicopters together. He changed airframes to keep him from going back to NY. Then they got Chinooks in NY and he got transferred there from Alabama where we were flying together again. He was really mad about going going back to NY and shortly after he got there they deployed to Afghanistan. He died on a mountain top when his aircraft struck the side of the mountain while performing a pinicle landing and he fell 1000 feet to his death. He is survived by his wife and daughter. I will wear the bracelet in remembrance of him for the next 11 years because that was how long we were friends.

Joel

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November 19, 2021

I had the honor and privilege of serving with "Liz" during her last night of her peace time mission state side. I feel a heavy burden that I can never explain. Alot of what ifs. I will never forget her smile, how it lit up a dark room with h out fail or her infectious bubbly personality that never allowed for a bad shift. Rip "Liz", we love and miss you.

Bones

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November 14, 2021

Semper Fi Sister ????
Always too young to die.

Jason

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November 11, 2021

SGT Sembly and SGT Fell both KIA 19MAY2005 Baghdad, Iraq. I’ve worn my Memorial Bracelet since 2005 as a daily reminder of their sacrifice and as a reminder that could have been me. I am proud to have served next to them and share their story so they live on. I will never forget that day. I’ve had to order 3 bracelets over the last 16 year (I do misplace at times) and Memorial Bracelets has been my go to, thank you Memorial Bracelets your bracelets is more than a memory, it is a reminder of how fortunate some of are.

Jase

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November 11, 2021

SGT Fell and SGT Sembly both KIA 19MAY2005 Baghdad, Iraq. I’ve worn my Memorial Bracelet since 2005 as a daily reminder of their sacrifice and as a reminder that could have been me. I am proud to have served next to them and share their story so they live on. I will never forget that day. I’ve had to order 3 bracelets over the last 16 year (I do misplace at times) and Memorial Bracelets has been my go to, thank you Memorial Bracelets your bracelets is more than a memory, it is a reminder of how fortunate some of are.

Tammy

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November 11, 2021

When Corey was in the army in Fort Richardson, AK I wrote to him quite a bit and he would write back. I really miss my baby brother. Just 45 days short of coming home after being in Afghanistan for 9 years, he was killed by a suicide bomber. Love you and mIss you so very much baby brother. RIP

Kevin

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November 8, 2021

It's my honor to wear this bracelet

Ginny

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November 3, 2021

I have a bracelet with the name Capt. Chambless Chesnutt on it. I know he was killed in action in Vietnam on September 30th, 1965. He was from Little Rock, Arkansas and was 31 years old so he was born around 1934. I would love to return it to his family.

Jimmie L.

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November 3, 2021

I ordered this bracelet because the remains of the one I was wearing were found and returned to his family. The bracelet I was wearing belonged to CWO Randolph J. Ard, who went missing in Laos in March of 1971. I had been wearing his bracelet for several years, when I did a search using his name on Yahoo. When I went to the POW/MIA database for verification, words can not express the feeling I had when I read that one of our missing soldiers was found and sent home. I have had many people ask me what the bracelet represented, and I gladly tell them that it is a reminder that one of our soldiers, who gave the ultimate sacrifice to preserve our freedom and way of life , has not been accounted for:and I will wear it until he has.
-Jimmie L. 6/21/2006

Katharine T.

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November 3, 2021

We lost my husband Tulsa Tuliau and my girl's dad September 2005. This is a very rough road to travel, but we've encountered so many fine American's along the way that every day we are reminded of the price we have to pay for our amazing soldiers sacrifices. God bless the USA!!
-Katharine T. 6/9/2006

Carol T.

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November 1, 2021

We had just buried our friend, Sgt. Russell Durgin on Saturday. I ordered my bracelet right away as tears were rolling off of my cheeks. He was killed in action on June 13th. He was only 23 years old. When I was in high school I wore a Viet Nam POW bracelet that I still have. It means a lot to me to wear that one at that time. This one is even more important.

Elijah

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October 31, 2021

You volunteered to go, survived and returned, and went back as a journalist. You saw the news slandering your brothers, so you went back. Though you didn't return, your sacrifice isn't forgotten.

Michael

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October 22, 2021

I also wore a bracelet for Lt Barton Creed in the early 70s when the bracelets came out. My condolences to his family. I still have one now.

Paul A.

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October 21, 2021

I proudly wear my bracelet in remembrance of my brother, CW2 Scott Jamar. Not only will it help me think of him, often but I hope that it will prompt others to ask why I wear it and who I wear it for, giving me the opportunity to tell them about him and what a great man, father, and brother he was.

Denise C.

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October 21, 2021

I remember when Kyle was deployed to Afghanistan that he'd gotten bracelets for one of his fallen comrades. Kyle was (and still is) my son. He was the truck commander the day their Humvee was attacked near Baghdad. I remain patriotic and steadfast in my support of our mission in Iraq...just like Kyle was. He enlisted in the Army in 2000. He reenlisted in 2004, knowing he'd be deployed to Iraq...and intended to reenlist again on his 6th anniversary- on May 4,2006. But an IED took his life on April 22.

Brenda W.

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October 21, 2021

My oldest son purchased the bracelets for my husband and I. We lost our middle son, Marine Cpl. Bryan S. Wilson on Dec 1,2004. It is special for our other son to give this to us. We proudly display it on our wrists every day! We miss our son deeply and nothing can change that. He and others like him are true American heroes. I am attending the funeral today for another home town hero.

Erik R.

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October 21, 2021

I chose to have A1C Elizabeth N. Jacobson because like her I am also a USAF Security Forces member. I was deployed to another location when our unit had heard the news of the loss of one of our own. We all know it can't bring anyone back but if it can help her family in anyway, I feel better.

Al C.

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October 21, 2021

I was an instructor at the NCO Academy with 1SG Bobby Mendez for four years. I got to know Bobby and will remember him for the most for how he always wanted to take care of "Soldiers". I was deployed to Iraq and learned of his death from young soldiers I was working with who used to work for Bobby. Bobby is the first friend I have lost in this war. I can tell his death was hard for them so I talked to them individually and told them to honor him.

Ed C.

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October 20, 2021

SFC Scott R. Smith was killed in action while trying to refuse a IED in Iraq on July 17,2006, a day that will live in my soul forever. Scott was a good man, and great soldier but most of all my best friend. This would have been his fourth tour of duty to Iraq and surrounding area's. He always said if he was going to go he wanted to go doing something he loved. Since riding motorcycles never took him we all knew that his job may and unfortunately did. Scott was my friend and he will be gravely missed by all that he ever touched. He was a caring person and would had given his last dollar to help a friend. He was and still is my friend and I will always love and miss him. Scott was a key player in many things used today by EOD and law enforcement personnel world wide. He was a key played in the intention of the robots you see used today by Law Enforcement and military personnel for bomb disposal. He helped invent the fire arm system used on the robots to fire a .50cal rifle at live munitions to help save lives. I cannot say enough about this man and he would have said he was just doing what was right anyway. The United States of America lost a great soldier and his family and friends lost a great person.

Deborah C.

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October 19, 2021

The reason I purchased the Pentagon Memorial Bracelet for Edward Rowenhorst, he's my cousin. Edward Rowenhorst and my uncle worked at the Pentagon, if it wasn't for playing golf that day I would have lost both my cousin and uncle in the terrorist attack on September 11th, 2001. I thought wearing bracelets was a wonderful way to show I will be forever thinking of him, which I did even without wearing the bracelet previously. Having bracelets in honor of those lost makes some people feel close to their loved one that was lost on September 11, 2001.

Joe P.

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October 19, 2021

I had my bracelet created in honor of SSGT Jame Thomas. I also served in the Vietnam and I was very fortunate to be one of the Marines that came home. I have a bond with SSGT James Thomas and will continue to remember his sacrifice to me and our country.

Hillary O.

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October 19, 2021

When I ordered the bracelet for myself I feel it symbolizes my generation's suffering. The POW bracelets represent the Vietnam while the 9/11 bracelets represent a day that I will never forget. There isn't a day that I don't think of Nicole Miller.

J. Riparbelli

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October 19, 2021

I ordered a POW bracelet, the bracelet I ordered had a particular name of a Vietnam veteran, I still have the original bracelet I wore for many years in 1971. Fred Holmes was a brother of a friend of mine. He is now listed on the Veitnam War Memorial in Washington D.C. My family will be visiting D.C. in a few weeks with my daughter's 8th grade class and I ordered the bracelet to wear when we visit the wall. It should be more meaningful after we visit the Memorial. Her friends are school are seeing the bracelet and asking about it, good for 8th graders to think about.

Clay H.

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October 19, 2021

My story is about Capt. Timothy Shane Adcock. He was one of my brothers of Phi Kappa Tau and we couldn't be prouder of him. There wasn't a person on Longwood University campus that didn't know him or know of him, and for all the right reasons, too. He was invincible, and larger than life, we would all agree to that . I know he us up in Heaven protecting us just as he did on Earth and he will be forever missed. Thank you Shane.

Sarah A.

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October 19, 2021

I ordered this bracelet in honor of my friend, Captain Shane T. Adcock. Shane embodies the spirit of a true soldier. My favorite thing about Shane was that he could make any soul on their worst day smile their biggest smile. The kind of smile that brings your insides to the surface. He truly touched every person that he came into contact with, whether it was his best friend or a stranger on the street. I am a better person for knowing him, and I hope that every day when I wear his name on the bracelet I will be reminded to live each day like Shane would.

Carey

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October 14, 2021

Hey Brother still think of you today. You paid the ultimate price for us. We are in your debt. Had a great time with you at SanDiego!!

JBH

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October 14, 2021

I have been an active duty Coast Guard for the past 9 years. I am also currently a pilot with the Group Air Station Atlantic City, where I fly the H-65 dolphin. I have been flying here since August 2000. On September 11, 2001, I was off going duty when the first plane hit the WTC. Since that time I have flown many missions over ground zero and deployed with a helicopter to a Coast Guard Cutter in support of homeland security on the first anniversary of 9/11.

Mr.Granados, the man which is engraved on the bracelet I purchased, was the US Coast Guard for many years. He was a Lieutenant Commander in the Coast Guard reserve and graduated from the US Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point. (Class of 1975) On September 11, 2003 Gilbert Granados was 51 years old, a husband, father of 2, and sadly his life came to a premature end. I never knew Mr. Granados yet, I share many things in common. I know he served his country and loved his family. As do I. Lastly, his family is bearing an enormous loss for our country and I wanted the bracelet as a reminder that those left behind deal with the losses of the 9-11 on a daily basis.

In the end, LCDR Granados' fate was sealed on my watch. The bracelet is a reminder of what I am doing here and to remind me to be a better person today than I was yesterday. I am proud to wear it.

Mary Ellen K.

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October 7, 2021

I wear my bracelet in memory of Patrick Roy, USS Cole. My husband is past commander of District 6 VFW and the current State Photographer and Public Relations officer. The VFW is committed to holding services every year on October 12th and I wanted to get more information in advance of our return trip to Antietam. We've met his family and feel sorrow for all the families that lost loved ones on the USS Cole and elsewhere.

David B.

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October 7, 2021

Chief Thomas Patrick Cullen Jr. is a close friend and brother firefighter here in the Florida Keys. His oldest son Thomas P. Cullen III passed on September 11th in the collapse of the WTC bldg 2. I wear the bracelet with Thomas P. Cullen III name in honor of these two.

Hicks

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October 4, 2021

Matty!!! I miss you brother. You are my HERO and will always hold the highest honor. I'll live the rest of my days out of respect for your sacrifice to our country. I thinking of you and your family regularly.

Thank you Mr. and Mrs Hennigan for raising such an amazing human beings!!!!

Daniel

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October 3, 2021

She was so young. She should have never had to die

GAD

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September 26, 2021

During the summer of 2009, at FOB Wolverine, I had the honor of serving with Sgt Edward Smith. Our Psyop Team was attached to 2nd Infantry Division. Riding in Sgt Smith's Stryker, 14 Bravo, missions in Zabul Province were something I will never forget !

He was a good man that liked talking about his family, and he was funny .....even joking while we were in bad situations in that nasty hell hole, Afghanistan. He is missed, as are his fallen brothers, Sgt Reynolds and SPC White.
RIP September 24, 2009.

Pat

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September 18, 2021

In the 70s, when Americans were sending for POW/MIA Bracelets by the thousands, I received one engraved Joseph Rose III. When Joseph returned home I discovered a newspaper photo of his wedding picture. I took off the POW/MIA bracelet but I’ve kept it all these years.

Ryan

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September 15, 2021

SSG Knauss was the best friend I ever had. Ive known him since I was 8 years old. I actually ordered my bracelet prior to him being listed here. He was an exemplary person with a work ethic no one could ever hope to match, and was a far better soldier than I ever was. Truly, the army lost one of its finest, and for you proof you need not look any further than a 23 year old man who had 2 MOS’, was airborne, special operations, and a Staff Sergeant. We all miss you buddy. I will remember you forever. I’ll see you one day.

Lynnette

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September 9, 2021

Michael Marti is my cousin and was only 26 years old when he was taken from us on that horrific day. He had stopped by work on his day off on the 104th floor of the North Tower. Michael was the life of everything and loved his parents above all else. Well and his car. Boys and their cars. Lol. He was the one always rooting for the underdog and his smile lit rooms up. I miss him every single day and always will. I am so grateful for the vacation we spent with our NY family. The one thing I have learned is always tell your loved ones how much they mean to you. Not one day is guaranteed to you.

Mike K Urbana

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September 8, 2021

I remember Alicia as a small 3 or 4 year old at summer time country parties with family and friends. My eyes tear up every time I think about a life lost so young. A rosary is said every 9/11 for John and Bev and all victims of that horrible day.

andrew

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September 3, 2021

IT SAD THAT SHE HAD TO DIE BUT I PRAY TO THE GOOD LORD ABOVE TO WATCH AND PROTECT HER AND HER FAMILY

JBH

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August 30, 2021

Doug was a childhood friend and one very funny, hugely entertaining guy. I was very proud when he joined the Marines (I chose Navy). I was staggered when I found out - he was the first of our group to lose his life in service. Recent events have made me think about his ultimate sacrifice.

Robert Banzin

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August 28, 2021

I cannot believe that it has been over 50 years since my service in Vietnam. I was a mail clerk/company clerk who served under Captain Nawrosky until he was wounded near Khe Sahn. I still have the last picture I took of him just before Operation Pegasus. I also served under E8 Sergeant Denison. They were both the finest leaders and men I have ever met. I have very fond memories of my service with Captain Nawrosky. The most memorable event was the time he asked me to caretake his personal assault weapon while he used another.

It took me years to realize the honor he had bestowed on his company clerk to care for it until he asked it back. I learned of his passing from Sergeant Denison months later. Sergeant Denison had left the company for another assignment. To this very day I still feel sad. Captain Nawrosky would have surely been a four star general had he lived. First, last and always he always protected his troops. Like a true leader he would never order a mission that he would not personally do himself.


Jim Blackwell

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August 26, 2021

I met Daniel when he was 16 or so. He was a great kid and a fine young man. I chaperoned their senior camping trip. He fancied himself quite the ladies man although he was painfully bashful. That was when I learned to love Daniel. He was proud to join the Army, and was excited to be a soldier. He was truly a great kid. I will always honor his sacrifice, and the sacrifice of all the young men and women who gave their life for this country, in the pursuit of our security and freedom.

Catherine

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August 9, 2021

My sister is 72 now, she wore Maj Charles J Huneycutt's MIA Bracelet since early 1968. Recently, she lost her bracelet and was heartbroken, since it has been such and important part of her life. As are the 2 bracelets I have worn since MIA/KIA 1969 & MIA 1972, respectively. We are honored to be the "Keepers of these brave men's Spirits..."

Nightmare

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August 2, 2021

The Men of 1st Battalion 10th Marines and the Marines of 2D MEB Task Force Tarawa will never forget you. S/F and till Valhalla

Mike

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July 30, 2021

50 years ago on 7/29/1971 we lost Robert John DiPietro in Vietnam. A 1965 graduate of Haston High School, he was the brother of John, Diane, Greg and Donald. He was married and educated at Ferris State University but was drafted after he finished college and went to serve his country. It was a tragedy I will never forget and never forget where I was when I found out. Rest In Forever Peace Bob. He is buried at Northview Cemetery in Dearborn.

Melsy

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July 28, 2021

I first met Jeff at a tennis tournament in Chicago that we both were working. He had just gotten a new hairstyle and I teased he looked like Rutger Hauer in Blade Runner. That was the start of a deep friendship. He loved to travel and would bring me back something from wherever he went. We could talk about everything, he truly was a gentle soul.

His travels were part of the reason I went to University in the UK. He helped to allay all my fears. We wrote back and forth telling each other of our troubles and helping each work through them.

After I graduated and came home it was his turn to follow a dream, being a flight attendant. Together we made it through with emails of uncertainty talked through and celebrating all his achievements. His email that he made it was filled with joy and happiness. He quickly made it to being the First Class attendant due to his personality and smile.

September was the month of both our birthdays, 1 day apart. On September 10th, we were emailing back and forth that I would meet him in Boston later that month and he'd show me the town. We only stopped because he needed some sleep before his flight to LA and a few days off at home.

A day later a hole was created in my life. The world lost one of the most kindest and giving souls on the planet. He did not hate, though he was himself hated. He saw the good in everyone.

To this day I cannot see any footage of that event without feeling his loss. I wear his bracelet not to remember him as I will never forget Jeff, rather to make sure others know and remember the innocents we lost that day. The world became a much sadder place after he and the others were taken from us way too soon.

Joe

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July 26, 2021

Daniel Unger was a special kind of soldier. He put others first before himself. He was a man of faith. Daniel touched many lives during his lifetime, as short as it was. His brothers in arms shall never forget his smile and character. Rest in Paradise, brother.

Wilfredo Melendez

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July 26, 2021

Ashley was one of the best of us. Always striving to make the rest of us smile and make us forget where we were. I think about him all the time.

Bobby

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July 9, 2021

Patti Sheridan, former ExDir River Rats, asked me to wear her bracelet for "Pappy" Kahler 30 years ago. Patti flew west last month. The bracelet's cracked and needs to be replaced, but nothing will replace my memory of her or her request.

chris

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July 8, 2021

I dont know this man, but i thank him for his service, he did not know me yet he gave his life so that i could have a chance of living freely. I have nothing but the upmost respect to this man, the least I can do is make sure that he is never forgotten.

M.Keane

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July 7, 2021

Not a day passes dad that I don't think of you

Unknown

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July 5, 2021

My boyfriend is a Lieutenant on the FDNY and as you know aside from losing 343 firefighters among those were friends of ours, especially LT. Carl Bedigian he was a very close friend of ours that worked with my boyfriend and Engine 214 Ladder 111.

NLDRN

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June 22, 2021

My son is in the Army with the 101st Airborne stationed at Fort Campbell and last year was in Afghanistan for the holidays and did not return to the US until May, 2002. He is home now for this Christmas and I wanted to get him something meaningful. He had mentioned a memorial bracelet in honor of Neil Roberts. Even though the bracelet is a small gift it will mean the most to him.

kathleen

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June 5, 2021

Lost his bracelet in the ocean while swimming years ago, but never forgot him.

Pete

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May 31, 2021

We thank you for our freedoms Uncle Pete.

jesus

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May 31, 2021

My grandfather was a close friend of Glen. he passed when i was just a boy, so a lot of his things that have been passed down to me i have had to look up. one thing i did get that i wear every day is a memorial bracelet for M/SGT Glen O Lane USSF who went M.I.A 05-23-68 in Laos, Vietnam. My respect goes out to him and his family may he rest in peace. Memorial Day 2021

DANGER CLOSE

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May 28, 2021

NEVER FORGOTTEN

Louie

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May 12, 2021

Loving Brother

Lunchbox

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April 23, 2021

I will never forget that night. Sgt Haney was supporting my platoon in a ambush mission in Nangahar. The images of that night I will never forget. From a Sapper to an MP . Rest Easy Brother .

MY FIRST BORN

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April 14, 2021

YOU ARE MY HERO, I AM SO BLESSED TO OF HAD 32 YEARS, I WILL SEE YOU ON THE OTHER SIDE MY SON. I LOVE YOU!

Greeklady

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April 10, 2021

I wore a POW bracelet with your name on it when I was a teen here in Michigan. I looked in the newspaper daily to see if you had been released. I also kept you in my prayers. I still think of you from time to time. I just wanted you and your family to know.

Marsha

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January 13, 2021

I just wanted to say I received my KIA Bracelet today that has my
favorite Uncle's information on it and I cried as much today as the
day we received the notice he has been killed in Vietnam. I had
just turned 13 years old. I thought it was going to take my dad's
life as well as he mourned his death until we lost him in 2012. I
come from a long line of Military Veterans. I also bought a
KIA Bracelet for my youngest brother, who at the time of our
Uncle Dean's death (as we called him), was only 3 1/2 years old,
so he doesn't remember him as I do. We will wear these bracelets
with pride in our Uncle, family members who served as well and
those who gave their lives for this great country we live in. May it
never be damaged and destroyed. Thank you again for making it
possible that I and my brother will always have a constant
reminder of our Uncle and for what he gave for this country, and
to all who gave their lives and sacrifice for this country we call
home, the USA. May they all rest in peace

2020

Kimbo

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December 2, 2020

Don’t wait for your ship to come in, swim out to meet it

Michelle

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December 1, 2020

Gene was a wonderful, intelligent young man. He planned to teach and would have been an excellent teacher. He served because he believed in his country, service and all it stands for; protecting others being one of it's highest callings. All Gave Some ... Some Gave All. You are still loved

Donnie

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December 1, 2020

Mac, I hope you are reincarnated somewhere ... a kind soul like you should be preserved forever.

Sharon B K

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June 8, 2020

I still have my MIA bracelet I wore back in the 70's of C. Scott Harris who was shot down during the Nam crisis. His remains were returned to the U.S. in 1985. He was promoted to a Major after his death. He was from B'HM, Al.

Stephen W.

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June 8, 2020

I got my first bracelet back in the 70's, and it finally broke. Then I found this web-site where I could order a new one. It has the same name on it as before. Lt. Gary Fors. He has been missing since Dec. 1967, and I will continue to wear his name until he's returned home.

DeMarcus

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February 16, 2020

This is something I will hold dear to my heart. It couldn't be more perfect. I served with LCPL Wilson and thankfully he now will always be with me. He's Gone But Never Forgotten. Semper Fidelis

2019

Unknown

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August 19, 2019

I wore Col Begley's bracelet from the mid sixties until mid seventies. I refused to remove it when in labor with my second child. They taped it up. I came across it today and thanks to the internet, I was thrilled to see that he made it to US soil and was eventually identified. I hope that this brought a little closure to his family and friends.

Goettlicher

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August 19, 2019

My husband too wore Col Corbitt's MIA bracelet. He even had an id bracelet and engraved his name on it. While going through my husband's things (he passed away in September) I found both bracelets.

Cynthia

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August 19, 2019

Thank you for remembering my father. I can not tell you how much it means to me. Col. Gilland Corbitt is still considered " missing in action". He is not forgotten by your actions and your testimony.

Unknown

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August 19, 2019

The pastor of our church has a bracelet and my son, who is 10 yr. old asked Fr. about the bracelet. Fr. West explained the significance of the bracelet. If our son gets good grades on his report card, he usually gets to pick something as a reward. Last month, he told me he wanted a POW bracelet for his report card. I discussed this choice with him and told him that my mother and I had POW bracelets when I was his age. I had returned my bracelet at the end of the war to the memorial.

He had found your website and asked me to sit with him while he picked out his soldier's name. While doing this, he asked me the name of the soldier on my bracelet. After all these years, I remembered it clearly. Col. Gilland Corbitt- USAF. We found his on your website. I was extremely sad to think that my soldier had not come home and that he was not being remembered. I ordered another bracelet with Col. Gilland Corbett's name.

I hope that my son's bracelet will mean as much to him as mine has to me.

Anonymous

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August 19, 2019

I also wore a bracelet with Gilland Corbitt’s name on it for many years. I had to remove it once for a major surgery and it was lost at the hospital. Even tho I no longer wore it, I still have him on my daily prayer list.

Yvonne P.

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August 19, 2019

I also have a bracelet for Spec 5 Richard Garcia 3-71. Always hoping to find more information.

Roni C.

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August 19, 2019

I have a aluminum bracelet ordered in 1972 or 1973. I believe the name is M.I.A. I wear it every military holiday, in hopes he will be found one day. It reads: "Spec.5 Richard Garcia 3-71". It matches a Richard Garcia, who went M.I.A. in Laos the same month and year. God Bless all our Service Men and Women and Veterans of all wars.

Sunny

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August 19, 2019

I am married to Capt West's son who he never got to meet. Today is the 49th anniversary of the plane being shot down, and I was looking for something when I came across this post. Captain West was never found and was eventually declared KIA. His sister biked across Canada this summer on a mission of peace in honor of her brother.

Unknown

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August 19, 2019

I received my bracelet for LCDR James A. Beene when I was 17 while living at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. It is now 51 yrs old and still as proud of it as I was when I got it. Thanks to him as well as ALL who have served to make us free.

Laurie

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August 19, 2019

I too have a MIA bracelet with Capt Phillip Mascari name and date of 5/2/1969. In perfect condition. Didn't realize there were multiple copies. Always hoped he had been found and rescued.

Millard

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August 19, 2019

I've been wearing your bracelet for many years and I'm so glad you were released. I've always wondered how you made out I'm sure it wasn't but I'm glad that you endured you ordeal. I know this may seem trite but being a female I have utmost respect for the brave young men that keep our freedoms alive. I get choked up saying this in person so I'm happy to have the opportunity to give you my sincere thanks for your sacrifices.

Melissa B.

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August 19, 2019

I also have a bracelet with David Demmon on it. My father gave it to me to wear because he was going in for heart surgery. He wore it for a long time before that. He wrote to Davids mother as well and was basically told to leave her be to grieve. However, sitting in a dentist office one day, my dad was looking through a life magazine and found a picture of David before he went off to war. I have that life magazine with his bracelet. I hope someday someone figures out what finally happened to him but at least I have a face to go with the name. I now have a son in the Navy so this is one of his veteran brothers. God Bless you where ever you are.

James C.

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August 18, 2019

As a former 10th SFG "A-Det" Teammate from Bad Tolz w/Jimmy and Former POW MSG IKe Camacho prior to ETSing back to Ft Bragg. Ike was sent to us from Brook AMC for Rehab. The 10th made up a team from Short-timers A Det to help Ike "come back to us"?? For your info-Jimmy died in an USAF Arc light Strike he called upon himself to wipe out 3 NVA tanks and 250 NVA. I would have done the same as what Jimmy did after knowing what Ike had gone through for 2 ½ yeas as a POW. Jimmy's Gravestone in Arlington as "KIA". not MIA. Col Yarborough refused to list him as KIA until we had proof of his death (with his Wife's permission, Of Course!!) Jimmy was confirmed KIA using his daughter's DNA from bone fragments found at the site of A-101.... His is finally home!!!

CINDI B.

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August 18, 2019

My mom's brother was killed in VietNam in 1965. His name was Robert Guerin. He volunteered- was not drafted. He was only 19 when he was killed. She has found a man who was in his unit who knew him and became friends and was there when he was killed. They were close enough that one of this man's children named their son after my uncle. They named him Guerin. I ordered from Memorial Bracelet for my mom for her birthday and one for Robert Guerin's friend. THEY ARE BEAUTIFUL!!!

Erin K.

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March 24, 2019

I purchased several KIA bracelets from you after my fiancee was killed in Iraq 1LT Michael J Cleary...20 December, 2005. Its hard to believe that he's been gone for so long, but I haven't taken my bracelet off since it came. I can't thank you enough for making it for me.

2018

Dan I.

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December 29, 2018

I proudly wear LCpl Robert Posivio III on my wrist each and every day. This was the single greatest purchase I have ever made as it gives me an opportunity to reflect and thank Robbie every morning when I place it on my wrist. You see, I was not only his Marine Corps brother but also his recruiter. I had the honor of watching him lose nearly 100lbs to be able to ship to boot camp. Little did I know just how dedicated a Marine he would be. Godspeed Robbie and know you are never going to be forgotten. It's almost time to order a new one as this one is getting faded.

Michael C.

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December 29, 2018

I am very pleased and honored to have my bracelet. I purchased mine in honor of my best friend Spc. Jason A Disney. Diz was KIA during a deployment in 2002. I wear my memorial bracelet everyday 24/7 and it has still held up over the years. The bracelet does have a few scratches on it, but the lettering is still visible and can be easily read. My bracelet is a very important part of me and a consistent reminder of his selfless sacrifice as well as the sacrifices of those who came before him and the many still to come for our freedom. As a Veteran, i will never forgotten thoses who gave all, thank you.

Carrie J.

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December 29, 2018

SFC James Klimo 11/4/69. Finally found a replacement for my bracelet I first got in 1971. I was 11 yrs old. I lost it in the mid ‘80s playing volleyball outside. We searched for hours but could not find it. There was no way I knew how to replace it then. It is thanks to you that I can still wear it -and I do. The deal was back then to wear it until they came home or were declared dead. Since he is still MIA, I still wear it. Never forgotten.

Cynthia S.

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December 22, 2018

Tommy is my cousin. Our Mom's were sisters. In a small town you hang out with family. We grew up with our cousins, all 14 of us. Every Saturday we'd meet at my uncle's house for dinner and play. The adults would play a friendly poker game. Holidays as well. Tommy played the trombone & Mom the piano. We'd all stand around the baby grand piano & sing songs. That was our entertainment. T & I would play cars outside in the dirt and make wonderful freeways with curving interchanges. (Or so we thought). Tommy became a volunteer firefighter as soon as he turned 18. He volunteered for US Army duty as well. He was killed just a few weeks after his 19th BD. Just about 6 weeks after landing in SVN. Thank you for offering these. I chose orange to honor his units color. I chose the bracelet (I've had 2 POW/MIA bracelets retiring both). I also thank every Veteran I can identify for their service to our country and continue to honor him.

Rhonda B.

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September 4, 2018

Fought Hard till the end
And
Was still thinking of others till the end

Adam M.

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September 4, 2018

Sgt. Aultz, Corey J. KIA 30JAN07. One of my best friends, I'm on my second bracelet and never remove it, I also keep his picture as my background of my Facebook page. He was a great friend, an even better NCO, and will be remembered my many always. Miss you Aultz. Till we meet again on Fiddler's Green..

Kimberly B.

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August 5, 2018

I have worn 3 different POW/MIA bracelets for almost 30 years. I then realized i could be wearing my own fathers. And, got online and ordered the black stainless engraved with my father (PFS Charles M Bear) information including his location on the memorial wall, the marine seal and purple heart engravings. I absolutely love it. I wear it everyday upon my left wrist as that I have been wearing another MIA bracelet for a Therman M Waller on my right wrist for the past 30 years. I am proud and feel honored donning these. For me, they are a reminder of the ultimate sacrifices that have been made so I can live freely. They are a reminder to be thoughtful of others, and just a small trinket of having my father (whom passed when I was 6m old) close.

Stephanie

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July 6, 2018

My brother Barry R Franks died in Vietnam 1/17/69. I have always honored him and wear a KIA bracelet. I have a copy of "Reflections" a picture of the wall in my office and have for many years. When I had it framed I had a bracelet placed under the picture within the frame. Recently a client asked about the print and told me about his tour in Vietnam in 68 and how his cousin Pete Segundo, died over there 9/5/69. I have another print and just ordered two bracelets with Pete's name. I will have it framed and give it to my client as a gift for his service. Thank you for honoring all our soldiers.

Shari

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July 6, 2018

I am so excited to order a new bracelet in honor of MIA/POW Staff Sargent James Luttrell! I wore a bracelet honoring and praying for him as a teenager until it wore out! Honored to again have a bracelet to honor him and all the other service men and women protecting our great country!

2017

Jeffrey

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November 16, 2017

It has been a couple years, but it starts out as a long story from the newspaper. I would never have known her personally in a million years, but one of the reasons why I bought this Cuff Memorial Bracelet for Megan Mcclung was that the story when I first heard about it on the news, it got thrown at me like a ton of bricks. Although I am not related to her, the report itself tears me up from the inside and I have not even got the chance to get over her death. I was shocked at least for about the last two months of 2006, and the next year after, 2007 I was very much poor broken hearted man. At first, she was a very beautiful lady, had I met her in person, I believed I would have gone straight to heaven with her on that day. Secondly, she reminded me of my sister's age. They both had the same personality, same great looking lady, almost identical interests, etc. That is why I have been very close to her up till this day, somehow managed to take care what is left of her soul. Since then, I have somehow developed an intimate relationship even though she is already gone and I would happily give up everything I have in possession to show that I always care for her very deeply. I also wearing now because to open up the sore wounds that I have inside me to other people as a reminder. I wish I was there to experience firsthand what happen to her on that day. Now looking back as I thought about it, I really felt that I should be out there protecting her more than all the boys who fought this war. That is why this means a lot to me as a person which felt society has already forgot about females whose voice has already been shut out of the crowd and I am giving myself a chance to her voice. My Scars run deeper than the messages that I am writing to most of you out there who are diligently reading it on a day-to-day basis. Megan Mcclung is truly a very fragile rose. She in my view is one type of the girl that is very hard to find in this world, so I suggest that you stop taking her for granted and pretending that killing her off like a pig would not matter to you.

Kristy

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May 2, 2017

I just wanted to say thank you for continuing this legacy. I have been wearing a POW/MIA bracelet of SSG ELBERT BUSH since I joined the military back in 1987. I am no longer in the service, but I continue to wear mine everyday, everywhere and for every occasion. I don't take it off for dress up occasions or fancy parties, it has become deeply ingrained into my person. Not a day goes by that a person will not stop and ask me what's it's for, it is with deep honor and respect that I remind them that all gave some, but some gave all so that they could live freely. Over the years it has become scratched and less shiny, but nonetheless a reminder to me that because of someone else's sacrifice I can continue to live in a free country, with so much to be thankful for.

2016

Will K.

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July 17, 2016

Recently ordered mine. Servant of God Vincent Robert Capodanno (February 13, 1929 – September 4, 1967) was a United States Navy Roman Catholic chaplain and a posthumous recipient of America's highest military decoration — the Medal of Honor — for actions during the Vietnam War. In these disconcerting days it’s important to remember what good there is in the world. Thanks to Memorial Bracelets I will have that daily reminder.

Bobbi H

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July 12, 2016

This is bittersweet. I received my Lindsay S. Morehouse bracelet today from Memorial Bracelets. In a world filled with violence, we should not have to worry about our children not coming home as so many people are experiencing. Lindsay was in the World Trade Center on 911. Like so many others, there are so many chapters to her beautiful life. She was waiting on her Little with the Big Brother Big Sister Program. They had just found one for her. She was to meet her that week. I know the anticipation, the excitement, the waiting. If you read her story in Big Magic, like so many others, she was a beautiful young lady with a beautiful future ahead of her. I will wear this bracelet in her honor. I will not let her light go out. I will one day tell my Little her story. She will always shine. Darkness cannot put out light and a beautiful spirit.

MSgt Sheldon M.

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April 22, 2016

On 27 April 2013, SSG Michael H Simpson was critically injured as a result of an Improvised Explosive Device, (IED), attack during a patrol in Southern Afghanistan. SSG Simpson was transported to Landstuhl, Germany where he succumbed to those injuries on 1 May 2013. I will be visiting the grave of SSG Michael Simpson in Arlington for the first time since loading him onto the plane from Afghanistan to Germany in 2013. I am an active duty, USAF Chaplain Assistant who served in the joint hospital at Bagram AF. I never knew Michael while he was fully alive, but prayed day and night from the moment he was brought into the hospital that he would be able to see his wife and family in Germany before he passed.

2015

Anonymous

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March 1, 2015

Spc Wendling born Jan 3 1984, I believe he had just turned 21 least that what his buddy Spc Rosscoff told me the gunner of Truck C4. See the day started pretty normal till stupid hit and the first part of the RSE got pulled off and didn't communicate they hadn't cleared bridge 6. Our Patrol, pat 1 and pat 2 were called off to guard a broke down convoy when Sgt Wallace and Spc Wendling drove past us to the bridge 6. When we heard the thump and the 9 line start we flew and we did all we could but I lost Sgt Wallace in my lap as the words from the British medic echo "he's gone mate" and from what I was told they had to pry me away. I wasn't going to let him lay in his blood in that god forsaken place. Also Michael and I have the same birthday. Mine's Jan 3 1960. It true the only thing war is good for is to be CRUEL.

Michael

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January 24, 2015

I just ordered a from Memorial Bracelets in memory of Sgt. Shawn Dressler. He was killed in Iraq in 2007. Shawn was my first soldier and best friend. I miss him every day. Gone but never forgotten!

2014

William B.

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December 12, 2014

I received my Memorial Bracelet yesterday and immediately put it on. It reads: SSG Samuel J. Helfenstine USA 10 Jan 1968 SVN. We both went to Vietnam within days of each other in June of 1967 but to different units. He was and still is my best friend. I wasn't told of his death until a few days before my tour was over, much too late to sign on for another tour of duty. I think about him often and regret I wasn't with him when he died. He lives on in my memory today. May he rest in peace and may we meet again.

Shawn

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December 3, 2014

I ordered my bracelet from Memorial Bracelets for Army Specialist Dale J. Kridlo.  He was 33 when he was killed in action in Kunar Province of Afghanistan on November 7, 2010 when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire.  He had been in Afghanistan since December, 2009 and was scheduled to return home just before Christmas, 2010.

Jeannette

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November 13, 2014

The KIA bracelets I ordered were for my Dad and myself-- our previous bracelets were worn/faded and broken. The soldier, Eric Greco, was my dad's best friend, who sadly was KIA in the Vietnam War and on on my dad's birthday. When I presented the new KIA bracelet to my dad, the look on his face was absolutely priceless. He put it on immediately, as I did with mine, and we wear them every single day in honor of Eric Greco and his family.

Gillian

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October 1, 2014

I've been wearing my bracelet for Army Captain Eleanor G. Alexander since the day it arrived. I work with Veterans in Chicago and a friend gave me a book to read. Imagine my surprise when I came across a portion dedicated to Eleanor. We will never forget!!! (KIA 11-30-67)

Paulette

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September 8, 2014

I ordered some bracelets in memory of MSgt Aaron Torian who was serving with my son in Afghanistan. My son came home alive, MSgt Torian did not. My son has a great admiration for this operator and has an aluminum Memorial Bracelet, but I thought a paracord bracelet would be more durable, because the loss will never go away.

Anonymous

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August 16, 2014

I got my bracelet in honor of my childhood friend SPC Glen D Jones. I spent part of my childhood growing up in northern Minnesota. Glen used to live behind us. He was a few years older than I was but he was so cool to hang out with. We would go sledding in the winter time on the big hill by his house and ride all over the place on our bikes in the summer time. There were a few times that I was running late to meet my curfew that he would throw my bike in the back of his truck to make sure I made it home on time. Next to his house was a cemetery and every Memorial Day I would go and watch and be there when the services would take place. My family moved away so my Dad could go to Seminary. Once he was done we moved to North Dakota and were there when the first Gulf War started. We watched the news coverage like everyone else. We watched the aftermath of the SCUD hitting the barracks in Saudi and saw the aftermath. A week or so later on a Saturday night my, Grandmother that lived in MN called my dad and let her know to watch the newspaper we got and on the front page was the funeral of my childhood friend. I knew he joined the Army Guard in MN after graduating. That was my first real taste of what War was all about, the first person I actually knew that had died because of War. I was torn up for a few days and had some long talks with my parents. Well when I graduated high school, I myself joined the Air Force. I have been deployed and almost went to Saudi myself. After seeing an advertisement I decided to go to the Memorial Bracelets website and see if I could find a bracelet. Well, after thinking long and hard I decided that it was fitting to remember my childhood friend in this way. In closing I would like to say that Glen you are missed by many and now I have a lasting reminder of our friendship and our childhood.

Lisa Hostetter

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August 7, 2014

PFC Jonathon Hostetter Combat Engineer, 20 years old, was KIA in Afghanistan on August 23, 2013 by an IED. Jonathon was our oldest son. He stood 6ft. 4 in. and had blonde hair and blue eyes and was a friend to all he met. His personality was contagious and he was a son, a brother to his brothers, Spencer and Jamison, and a husband. He joined the military in September 2012. He was deployed on Easter Sunday, 2013. Some dates are ironic, He left for basic training, September 18, 2012. He graduated Basic Training and AIT on January 18, 2013. On September 18, 2013 we were having a memorial service at White Sands Missile Range for him. Exactly one year from when we were watching him board the plane for his new adventure in the U.S. Army.

My youngest son, Jamison, had me order this bracelet so he could have a reminder everyday of his brother. Also when people see the bracelet, he is proud to tell of his older brother, Jonathon. We hold on to our memories and need daily reminders of how important our freedom is and what the cost of freedom is to us all.

God Bless you for providing these to the families of the fallen. The cost is minimal because the memories are priceless!!

Sincerely,
Gold Star Mom, Lisa Hostetter

Anonymous

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June 29, 2014

I wear one for Lt Michael P. Rice, Sunbury KIA 13 Sept. 72.  He was a friend of my father's and he always wore his Memorial Bracelet. Once my father died I started to wear it to remember them both. The aluminum he wore broke at work one day and I just ordered a steel one.

Gillian T

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May 23, 2014

I just ordered from Memorial Bracelets to honor the service and life of Army Nurse Eleanor Alexander. She was KIA on November 30, 1967 when she was 27 years old. As a young woman who wanted to be in the marines as a medic I felt she was a perfect person to honor. I will never, ever forget you Eleanor and will wear your bracelet with love and thanks for all you've done for us!

Christine A.

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March 4, 2014

When I was a child in the 60's I wore the bracelet of a soldier fighting in Viet Nam. I often thought of this young man all these years. Well last year I came across the Memorial Bracelets page on FB. I searched the archives and found his name and learned he in fact died in Viet Nam all those years ago. I was so sad to learn this because I had hoped and prayed all these years that this young man had come home and lived a full life. Well my son's 5th grade class went to DC for a field trip and so I sat him down and told him this story. I told him this young man's name - well my son visited the Viet Nam Wall and when he came home he handed me a piece of paper where he traced this young man's name for me- PFC Sander C. Sanderson. It was a special moment and gift - one that I will treasure forever. I just wanted to thank you for allowing me to find this young man and to thank him in my heart.

Laurie F.

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February 6, 2014

I just ordered a dog tag to honor my son's best friend, Justin J. Swanson, who was killed in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom on November 10, 2009. My son was in the Humvee that drove over the IED that killed Justin. I am so thankful that my son was able to survive and come home however I don't ever want to forget that Justin paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

Sandy

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January 12, 2014

Dean was my big brother and best friend. We had two half-brothers who have passed away, and one half brother who I thank God that is still alive. To me he is just my brother, and I love him just the same. Dean and I were very close in age and usually were the only ones we could depend on. Our older brother, when he was 17, went into the Army. One died at 6 months, the other was born the day after my 12th birthday. Dean was born December 19, 1946. I was born March 8, 1948, so we were close in age and a year apart in school. He was the best man when I got married. We double dated a lot. So I want everyone to know how great he was. I was pregnant with our son when my husband was in Vietnam. He was wounded, spent 5 months in a hospital, then went back to finish his tour. Dean was in OCS when he came home on leave, he went out bought my crib for the baby's clothes, then bought baby clothes and diapers to fill it. He was more to me than just a big brother, I think of him every day. My husband spent two tours in Vietnam and received the Purple Heart, plus others. He says his most cherished is his CIB badge. I cross stitched him a picture for it. As he was a lifer a lot of his buddies saw it and asked me to make them one. Jerry was in the Army when we got married so I got to spend 23 years as an Army wife and loved and was very proud to be one. So maybe that can tell you why I think our men or women who have served and our still severing our country get respect they deserve. TO BE HONEST though, my heart belongs mostly to the Vietnam VETS, they still haven't got the welcome home they deserve.

2013

Kelli T.

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November 17, 2013

I just purchased my second bracelet from Memorial Bracelets.  I chose Lance Corporal Norman C. Ballard, KIA 30 Jan 68, SVN. He is from my little bitty hometown of Felda, FL. Semper Fi!

Anonymous

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September 7, 2013

As September 11 approaches, keep those who mourn and hurt in your prayers always, but especially during this time. Bear one another's burdens. I had to replace my Mercy BAND (bear another's name daily), lost it in a military move, but I replaced it with the same name as I got right after 9/11 happened.  The same name I wore on my wrist on my wedding day, and so many days in between. I don't know AG2 Matthew Michael Flocco, or his family, but they are prayed for. Praying for peace, comfort, and love to surround them.

SSG Alexandra G.

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August 24, 2013

My close friend, Job M. Reigoux, was killed in Afghanistan on 1 June 2013, from injuries he sustained thanks to a coward with an RPG. I ordered the bracelet on 2 June, when I learned of his death. Every person we've lost - every person named on your blog - is a whole person, and there are not words enough to describe the world you lose in the person who is gone. Let me say that he was, at bottom, a Non-Commissioned Officer in every sense of the word, and every NCO that has ever had the honor to wear the stripes will understand the world contained in that statement. As an NCO myself, I ask myself what Job would do when confronted with a situation in which I am unsure what the right answer is. Job has not guided me wrong yet, nor do I think he ever will. The loss never ends, it reverberates every second of every day. His unit flew home three weeks after he died, and he was supposed to have been transferred to a larger post three days before his death, but the move was postponed. There is great bitterness in knowing that, in knowing that had some Army bureaucrat not changed their mind from the safety of a hardened TOC somewhere, he would still be here. But there is less bitterness when I think of all the things he taught me when he was alive, and all the things he still teaches me now he is gone. There is even greater comfort in knowing that when my time comes, he will be there. I do not remove this Memorial Bracelet; it has not left my wrist from the moment I opened the package in the mail. When I deploy in future it will be there with me, and so will he. 

Anonymous

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June 24, 2013

I first met Andrew McConnell at North Georgia College and State University; a Military college in Dahlonega Georgia. We were both assigned to 2nd Bat. First platoon in Foxtrot Company. It was a frantic, hard core, "Hooah" kind of atmosphere - a true Army environment. When walking by any officer, it was required that all new recruits salute, say "good morning/afternoon/evening X" and sound off with your company motto. I can remember many times being worn down, exhausted, on the brink of collapse, and hearing McConnell sound off - "GOOD AFTERNOON SIR, KEEP UP THE FIRE!" It was always a morale booster, it seemed to galvanize my spirit and that of everyone in earshot of his shout. He was always like that. After the initial APFT, I realized that I was having a difficult time getting my run time where it should be. McConnell also noticed, and took it upon himself to help me. He would take his free time and go running or swimming with me one on one. He helped me learn to breathe better while running long distances. He made me a stronger individual, thus making our whole platoon stronger. Andrew McConnell understood what it meant to be a soldier, a friend, a brother in arms. It pains me to say that he met an untimely end fighting for those he loved. I know that Andrew is sorely missed... I know there is not a day that goes by where he is not on someone's mind.  I know without a doubt that his attitude towards life, his love for his family, country, and fellow soldiers will endure in the lives of those of us that were lucky enough to know him, Lucky enough to call him a friend.

Heather C-W

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June 4, 2013

My uncle, James H. Craig, was KIA in SVN 6 months and 1 day before I was born in 1970. I wear my Memorial Bracelet proudly in memory & honor of him every day. I love the expressions on people’s faces who are familiar with the bracelets and their history when they see it and ask me about it. You can tell they are surprised that someone who was barely born in that era has one, let alone knows it's significance. Thank you for my bracelet. It keeps my uncle with me and gives me a solid reminder of those men & women who have and are still out there protecting me & my family. Bless you all!! 

Anonymous

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June 3, 2013

I purchased a Memorial Bracelet to honor my fallen friend and true American hero. In a day and age where that phrase is thrown around with little regard to its true meaning. Major Crocker truly represented what it means to be a leader, patriot and a REAL American hero. Semper Fi

SGT Kuriscak and SGT Lang

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February 16, 2013

As a constant reminder of lost loved ones or heroes that gave the ultimate sacrifice. I chose to wear a Memorial Bracelets for PFC Brandon Meyer. Brandon was killed in Mosul, Iraq on 28 Jan 2008. You see I meet Brandon's Dad in 2011 in Mosul, Iraq at FOB Marez, his Dad was working for a contracting company there for the military. He told me Brandon's story, it was kind of eerie that his dad ended up working were his son had been deployed, I guess in a sense you could say he was finding some closeness to his son, by being stationed there working for the contracting company anyway I just want Mr. and Mrs. Meyer and their daughter to know that Brandon is not forgotten. RIP Brandon

Mel Lockwood

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January 12, 2013

I wear my Memorial Bracelet to remember the bravest man I've ever met. Sgt. Joseph Bovia was a Marine who was KIA on August 31st of 2010. Our moms are best friends and I bought them these bracelets to honor him and his memory. Joey, you are missed by all who had the honor to meet you. 

2012

1SG David M. C.

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November 23, 2012

Just received my Memorial Bracelet today in the mail. The workmanship is great. Found the web site from one of the guys that I with work here with in Baghdad. He ordered his bracelet from you also. SSG Keith Maupin's Dad is my cousin. Since I am not really good on family relationships, I did not know he had deployed over here until he was listed as duty status unknown. I am currently in Baghdad, Iraq. It is my third trip. I am performing my job as all soldiers here do. Since being here during this deployment, I have received packages from the yellow ribbon support group that his parents started on his behalf. I am grateful for their support, and all that support us while we are here.

Gail

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November 23, 2012

I wore a MIA/POW Bracelet for Lt. James E. Teague until they notified me that he had been brought home.  A very sad time for me. I used to look at his bracelet every day and pray and wonder where and how he was. All these years since, I would think of him and his family and how their lives changed with his death.  John 15:13 - "No one has greater love than this, to lay down one's life for one's friend." I have read the summary of his mission and the shoot down sequence provided by Theodore G. Stier CDR, USN (Ret.)  I have always wondered what happened.  It brought all the feeling back like it just happened. Always wanted to get in contact with his family and tell them how sorry I was and that I prayed for him every day but did not have the resources.

Dan B.

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November 15, 2012

I just ordered a Memorial Bracelet in memory of my childhood playmate SP4 James E. Jaranson. Jimmy was killed in Vietnam 6 months before I went over. He and I played ball every day at recess in school. The other popular boys would not let us play ball with them, so Jimmy and I teamed up and played catch. I guess we shared difficulties as little boys, and I wasn't there for him when he was in difficulty in Nam. I'm sorry Jimmy so sorry. God keep you my friend.

Ann S-Y

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November 6, 2012

He was the brother of a friend of mine. I remember clearly the look on her face when she was called out of class that day. It brought the war home to me in a very personal way and was a wakeup call for a 12-year-old. His death changed me in a profound way and that led me into activism on several political issues and put me on a career path where I was able to change a small corner of the world. God bless him and keep him.

Michael P.

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October 21, 2012

I ordered a KIA Memorial Bracelet for 1LT James Zimmerman USMC, KIA Helmand Province, Afghanistan 02 November 2010, OEF. We were in the reserves together as enlisted infantry. I remember him driving us 0351s around Quantico during an AT prior to deploying for OIF in 2006 and getting lost. He was one of my favorite '11s. I'm sure his guys were lucky to have him as an officer.

Gary S.

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October 7, 2012

I ordered a Vietnam War Memorial Bracelet for Captain Lance Sijan (USAF) who was shot down over NVN and evaded capture for 12 days. When finally captured by the NVA and taken to the Hanoi Hilten, he was repeatedly tortured for any information. As the NVA could not force him to respond to their questions, he was refused medical attention for wounds suffered in his aircraft crash and the wounds inflicted upon him during the many torture sessions. His cellmates attempted to get him to eat and treated his wounds as best they could, but he died in the NVA prison. Captain Sijan was later awarded the Medal Of Honor posthumously. The bravest of the brave.

Thomas D.

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September 12, 2012

I purchasing my Memorial Bracelet to remember Spc Clarence Cash. He was killed in Desert Storm, were we served together. He was a true friend and brother. Thank you for allowing me to honor my friend.

Sonie R.

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September 11, 2012

This is for SIRIUS. He was in the K9 unit for the NYPD as a bomb detector dog. He lost his life on 9-11 when the WTC tower fell while he was doing his job. My Memorial Bracelet is for him. I wear it all the time and tell others about him. I have always loved dogs and raised and trained puppies for the GUIDE DOG FOUNDATION out of Smithtown NY. I think all that lost their life should not be forgotten, even the 4 legged ones.

Lenora F-S

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September 10, 2012

I have worn my Memorial Bracelet for 10 & 1/2 years in memory and honor of my beloved nephew, Christopher Michael Traina, who was killed on 9/11 while working in 1WTC. I only wish I, and all others who wear a bracelet, did not need to!!

Thomas D.

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September 10, 2012

I have been wearing an MIA/POW Bracelet since I was 12, and now I am 41. I am a Desert Storm Veteran. I lost my best friend in the war. When I found Memorial Bracelets web page, I knew I had to order his bracelet. Thank you for giving me the chance to honor his memory. I will never forget Spc. Clarence Cash.

Timothy I.

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September 5, 2012

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet to memorialize a soldier: Spc Cedric L. LENNON. I had taken him under my wing. He was new to the Army and had some adjusting to do. I was his first NCO (permanent party) and taught him everything I knew. Eventually he found out he enjoyed being a soldier and reenlisted. I transferred to a different Squadron and would see him on occasion. He was doing well. Our regiment deployed to Iraq, and within a few months of deployment, I found out that he had passed. It always hit you hard when someone you know is killed, but even harder when that person is like a son. This bracelet is a small reminder of his life, and the sacrifice he made. Every soldier that deployed with me (in my platoon at that time) made it home, I wish he would have too.

Richard B.

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August 23, 2012

I met Cpl Brian E. McCarthy in the Central Highlands of Vietnam in 1969. We laughed and cried during our eight months together, and became as close as brothers. He was KIA during the invasion of Cambodia, and I will never forget him. RIP Brian.

Nathan L.

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August 13, 2012

I just ordered a bracelet in honor of USAF CAPT Steve Phillis. He was shot down and KIA in his A-10A in the Gulf War. He was protecting then Lt. Robert Sweet who was also shot down and taken prisoner. I had the pleasure of meeting Lt. Col Sweet many years later while working on A-10C's at Moody AFB, GA. We both share the same hometown and a love for Mountaineer football. I dedicate my bracelet to both of these fine examples of American heroes.

Cheryl L-S

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August 7, 2012

I was given my Memorial Bracelet from a good friend. It carries my son's name Sgt Leston Tony Winters. He was killed in action July 15 2010 in Afghanistan. I will wear it proudly, not just for my son, but for others who have fallen. Proud Mother of a fallen hero. My HERO My SON.

Mark D.

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July 20, 2012

My pain, my sorrow, my loneliness because of the loss of my Son can only be approached by my PRIDE, my GRATITUDE, and my LOVE for Mark. I am so humbled to be called his father. His legacy of love, and acceptance I strive to continue. His humor, his strength, his humility I miss like my next breath. We will forever miss you my son.

Anonymous

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July 5, 2012

Jason Plite was just another kid on the block. Growing up we played outside all the time. We were classmates and great friends. Jason always wanted to grow up helping people. It's no surprise he joined the USAF and became part of their elite Pararescue, where their motto is "That others may live". May he rest in Peace, and his memory live within all of us.

Pat Papike L-D

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May 4, 2012

The unsung heroes of the Vietnam War are from my generation. I still see the vestiges of the war on the faces of some of the homeless people I encounter in my daily routines. As I look forward to my 65th birthday next month, I bought myself a birthday present - a Memorial Bracelet in honor of a friend who was killed in 1967. Wish that he could have lived the full life that I have enjoyed. Here's to you Marine Private Danny O'Laughlin!

Anonymous

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April 22, 2012

I never knew Josh Cullins, but Josh was a fellow Marine combat veteran and Peace Officer from my town and one of 5 that didn't make it home. In 10 years our National memory will fade about the thousands of ultimate sacrifices like Josh. This is my small way to remember and help others do so too.

Melissa W.

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February 3, 2012

I wear my Memorial Bracelet for my best friend and soulmate PFC SEAN D THARP FL ARMY KIA IRAQI FREEDOM 28 MARCH 06. I spoke to him on the phone just 4 days before that. He said he would always be with me and always protect me his mom and my family. last words I heard from his mouth was "I love you too Melissa, you need to be strong, my mom will need it." My heart goes out to you, it’s a tough thing to go through. Bless you and your family. 

Maria P.

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January 30, 2012

To remember my cousin Sgt Daniel J Patron who was KIA on Aug 6th 2011. He was on the EOD team. He will always be loved & missed dearly.

Amy H.

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January 24, 2012

I got my Memorial Bracelet in August 2010 for my cousin SSGT RUSSELL L SLAY TX USMC KIA IRAQI FREEDOM 09 NOV 04. I will never ever forget him and the sacrifices he made for his family & country. he was killed by a sniper in Al Anbar Fallujah on his 2nd tour. He told his family before he left that he knew he would not make it back out alive.

Robert H.

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January 24, 2012

Sgt Dean was one of our Platoon Sgts. (Recon). He was a quiet, non-forceful man, a friend as much as a Sgt. He was hit in the head three times and had his arm shattered, while he was charging a machine gun nest to save his men. He was taken to Plieku to an Army hospital, where he later died of Hepatitis, while trying to recover from his wounds. So whether you buy or have bought a bracelet, even though the name on it may be personal to you, what he did and all the others, bracelet or no, needs to be thanked and remembered by all of us. We may not know all the names, but we do know what they all did for us. R.I.P. all you brave soldiers.

Si

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January 14, 2012

Randall Kenneth (Randy) Campbell was a team mate and true friend of mine when we both served in Bravo Company/3rd Recon Bn (and deployed to VN in March 1965 from Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii). Randy personified the characteristics of a USMC RECON Marine: "R for Running, E for exercise, C for can do, O for on the run, N for never quit."  It's fair to say, Randy's style and accomplishments served as a model for the whole company and he was our first loss in April 1965.  His loss was a significant wake-up call for what Vietnam action (whatever the media chose to call it, war, conflict, or combat action) truly meant. All who knew him, from that day on, knew what could lay ahead for each of us remaining. My recollection is that Randy always said he was from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Incredibly, I contacted a Montreal school chum of Randy's (Basil S. - now residing in British Columbia) who was also in contact with Randy's mother, still in Canada. As soon as I knew that Randy had passed on that April, I swore, if I ever had a son, I would name him after Randy and I kept my word. My first-born son is today an active duty U.S. Marine officer with Randall as his middle name. I'm ordering a bracelet for this son, another for John C. (who was seriously wounded when Randy was killed); the third bracelet goes to another Canadian, Bas S. for his efforts in helping us (in CONUS) find Randy's mother and thus closing a more than a thirty-five-year search for her. I proudly wear Randy's bracelet as an ever-present connection to him and all he represents as a model of courage and commitment to selfless duty. Please note also: Randy is buried in Elmira, NY and his name is on our Wall and on the Canadian VN veterans wall in Windsor, Ontario, CDN.

2011

Anonymous

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December 15, 2011

Just ordered a KIA Bracelet for SPC Steven Gutowski, KIA 28 SEPT 2011 in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan, in Support of OEF. Steve was a brother in arms and grew up the next town over from me in Southern MA. Hadn't seen him in years as he went Active and I was Guard. Coincidentally we both ended up working out in the same province. I had a great time catching up with him in August; I was flying out for reassignment, he for leave, we ended up on a bird together. A month later as I am flying home for leave, I recognize a patch, and asked the kid if he knew Steve, how was he doing, and got the news. I’ll never forget.

Lisa G.

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November 13, 2011

I ordered two Memorial Bracelets today in memory of my uncle who was KIA May 13,1969 in Thua Thien S Viet Nam. One for myself and one for my mother- his sister. Though he has been gone from our lives for a long time, he will live in our hearts forever, he is our hero. We will miss him until we see him again. RIP William Franklin "Sonny" Silver, Jr.

Kathy B-A

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October 16, 2011

I just looked up a Memorial Bracelet of a friend I went to school with, CPT Mark Garner. I didn't know Mark especially well, but I knew him enough to know that he was a great person and a great soldier. I remember going to his funeral in our hometown in 2009, and I remember how upset it made me. Like I said, I didn't know him that well but I knew him and went to the same school, we were even in JROTC together. I guess being a veteran myself and knowing the sacrifices so many have made firsthand and knowing so many others who served in Afghanistan just made it that much more intense for me. I hope his mother (who was also my high school biology teacher) and his wife don't mind me wearing a bracelet in his honor.

Sharon S.

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October 16, 2011

I just ordered a Memorial Bracelet for a young friend who was killed in Iraq. I did not know there was such a thing until I read an article about Jessica Ellis in the Idaho paper. I will wear this bracelet with honor and think of Jessica and her family. Jessica was a lovely young woman who is missed. God bless her family and all the families who have lost someone in this war and God bless all the men and women who are still deployed and keeping our country safe. Thank you.

Thoma V. U.

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August 12, 2011

His mother and I met while stationed in Stuttgart West Germany. We met and had a small fling just before I left for Alabama. I only found out he was my son about 4 years ago. I got the chance to tell him about his family on my side, about me, my job, you get the picture. Anyway, I got the chance to talk to him as he was trying to enter the Marine Corp. He chose the Army for various reasons. He signs up, and gets chosen for "Sniper School". He graduates youngest in his class, and my understanding of it was that out of 70 something, he finished 12 or 14th. He goes to Afghanistan, gets in a "Stryker Unit. (I work at Anniston Army Depot. We built and rebuilt the tanks used over there). Well anyway, he goes on a sweep of some area there. He and his medic dismount the vehicle and a suicide bomber runs up and ignites his vest. My son and the son of another grieving family were killed instantly. I wish I could have met him, and talked to him face to face and not just over the phone. It would have been cool to have been able to hang out with him for just one day. I'll will wear his Memorial Bracelet until the day I can meet him face to face.

Anonymous

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June 25, 2011

Just got two Memorial Bracelets one for myself and one for my Brother John, to remember and honor our Father, Sgt Willard Robert Ryan who gave his life in Vietnam. Mom was pregnant with John, my sister was two, I was one. Mom had a breakdown that lasted her lifetime. Dad regardless is my Hero, not drafted, but volunteered to fight for what is right. Freedom. The Dog tag will never come off my body. I honor my Father from within every day that I breath. Now I have a way to honor him on the outside so that others may see, and inquire and I can tell his story. Thank you to the people who make these precious memorials.

Anonymous

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June 3, 2011

SPC Jose A Torre was an extraordinary person. I had the honor of serving with him in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri when he and I were first entering into the military in 2008. We were the same platoon, the same squad, and slept in neighboring barracks bays. Torre was an exemplary soldier, often setting a standard by which we all tried to meet. In training he was quick to absorb all details and many times was able to help other soldiers in understanding new subjects. When I was his squad leader, Torre was always there with fresh ideas and tactics, and was great at bringing moral up. I came to love Torre as a brother, as we all did. His death struck a deep chord in everyone who knew him and I will carry his memory close to me with this Memorial Bracelet.

Tammy H.

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May 28, 2011

My daughter, Whitley, will be graduating from Orange Grove High School on June 3rd. When she was taking senior pictures she wanted to take a picture of her bracelet she wears to honor one of her best friends, Pfc. Colton Rusk, who was killed December – 2010. Colton was a 2009 graduate of OGHS and was the big brother she always wanted. Thank you for honoring our soldiers.

Doris P.

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May 28, 2011

I have a Memorial Bracelet for Vincent Saracini, the pilot whose plane hit the South Tower of WTC. I previously had one for Andrew Fredericks, a fireman killed at the WTC. Mr. Fredericks' bracelet was made of brass I think and tarnished. It was no honor to him and I had to get rid of it, but fortunately I ordered and will receive a red one for him. This 9-11 is the 10th anniversary and I hope there is a lot of participation to honor all the innocent victims.

SSG Philip R Walker

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May 28, 2011

I wear a Memorial Bracelet for SFC James E. Thode of NM. He was a true NCO and leader of Soldiers. I served with him for two deployments and am honored to be able to say I knew him. May he rest in peace, and may his family feel comfort from God.

Anonymous

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May 28, 2011

I just placed an ordered with Memorial Bracelets for my best friend that I lost Sept 27 07. His name was Randy Johnson. I went into basic training and met him there. We did AIT together and almost got the same orders for the first three years of my enlistment. We got separated when I changed my post. We had lost contact for a few years, until I was stationed at Ft Jackson. I was a garrison MP at the time. I got a call about a shop lifter. And when I pulled up to the P.X, I ran into him after two years of a phone call here and there and a letter from time to time. I lost touch during my tour in Afghanistan. I ETS'ed out of the Army in 05 after 16 years of service. I would time from time check causality reports, and on October 3rd I saw his name. After the shock wore off, I still have that whole in my heart for Frank and the other 5,000 or so of my other brothers and sisters lost in the past 10 years. After Frank passed, I tried to reenlist. Which was denied because of my PTSD diagnosis. Thanks for the opportunity to share my story.

Amy T.

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May 17, 2011

I ordered 2 black Memorial Bracelets, one for my husband and one for me, both with the same name on them. We have not received them yet, they were just mailed out today, but here is why we ordered. The soldier on our bracelets is SSG Curtis Oakes. Curtis and my husband were both stationed in Korea together and then when they were sent back to the states they were both stationed at Ft. Campbell. I never in all the time that I knew Curt thought that I would be ordering a bracelet with his name on it.  He was a dear friend to both my husband and me. He was one of 6 soldiers killed in Afghanistan on November 29, 2010 when an Afghanistan cop turned around and opened fire on them. Curtis was a great friend, father, and husband he treated people like he wanted to be treated. Curtis touched the lives of many people. I don't think that I ever met anyone that didn't like Curtis. I feel privileged to have been able to be part of his life, and to have him be part of mine. There is not a day that goes by that we don't think of him. And now we will be wearing our bracelets to keep his memory alive, and to keep him close to our hearts.

Lawrence M C.

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March 24, 2011

Pfc. Donald Lyle Elliott grew up in the same neighborhood, only a few houses apart. I used to wander the neighborhood and about 5, I walked up the street and he was playing in his front yard. We began playing together and eventually went thru the Cranston, RI school system until he left in 1965. There was an empty lot across the street from his house and we would play for hours in the tall grass. We did boy stuff like catching frogs and turtles in a nearby pond. We played cowboys and hid and seek. One day, we drew blood and became “blood brothers”. As kids so often did, we promised to be friends forever. I never knew where Donnie went, but in late 1969, news went through the neighborhood that Donnie was KIA in Vietnam. I was stunned and after my father told me, I went to my room and cried. I denied that news for years but never forgot him. This past January, I was told he moved to Massachusetts, I researched the wall and found his name there. I have been grieving since that time. I posted a memorial page on my web site for Donnie, and I am certain it may take an awful long time for the pain of his death to subside. I ordered my bracelet to honor my friend Donnie. I remember drawing blood from my right wrist when we became “blood brothers” and it is on that wrist that I wear his bracelet. I wear another to remember a classmate Kevin Carroll Hanley. Both of my friends were U.S. Marines and both were KIA only days after their 19th birthdays. I made a promise to both Donald and Kevin to wear these bracelets for the remainder of my life. I have stipulated in my will that upon my death, they remain on my arms as an eternal reminder of the love between three friends. Donnie and I promised to be friends forever, and I will fulfill that promise.

Mary W.

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February 26, 2011

I always wore my POW/MIA bracelet and never took it off until 1975, Staff Sergeant Sandy Sanderlin. I still have my bracelet. I never heard anything and have always wondered and like others, felt very close to him. I went to the Viet Nam Wall in Washington and found a name very similar to his, I think he died. I tried to find family throughout the years and never did. I would love to give the bracelet to someone in his life to know he was not forgotten, to know that I always cared for him.

Anonymous

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February 26, 2011

I wore my Sandy Sanderlin bracelet, prayed for him regularly, and tried to contact his family, but they understandably did not reply. It was enough for me that they knew that their loved one was not forgotten. My bracelet broke also. But I wore it until then. 72 through 76. My husband and I were in a hotel room in the late 80s and "coincidentally" came upon a news report while flipping through the channels where they mentioned Sandy's name as one whose remains had been returned. I wish I knew more.

Susan Heywood

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February 26, 2011

This is so odd. I was just thinking of the bracelet that I wore many years ago! It was the same as above Staff Sergeant Sandy Sanderlin. I did in fact write to his wife many years ago. She was in Texas at that time. If memory serves me right, I had sent the letter through the address I obtained the bracelet from, and they forwarded it on. She did respond back to me!

Marianne C.

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February 23, 2011

I wore a bracelet with the name Lt. Barton Creed for many years. It was a source of many debates with my family who thought it was too much to wear. I still have it. Lt. Creed was MIA. Recently a friend went to the Viet Nam Memorial in DC and brought me back a rubbing of Lt. Creed's name.

Lana G.

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February 21, 2011

Back in the 70s, I had a POW/MIA bracelet. Somehow it got lost through the years. When I found the MemorialBracelets.com website, I was so excited. I now, thanks to you, wear a POW/MIA Bracelet with the name of the same man on it. I never forgot his name. When I first had the bracelet, he was on the MIA list. I have since learned he was killed. His name is Col. Burriss N. Begley, USAF, Dec. 3, 1966, North Vietnam. Somehow, I feel very close to him after all these years. Thank you so much for allowing me to continue wearing Col. Begley's name on my wrist.

MAJ David Admire

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February 12, 2011

My name is MAJOR David Admire. I'm an Occupational Therapist stationed at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital at FT Campbell KY. I met CPL Hutchins in my clinic after he fell off a guard tower last year and broke his wrist. He was evacuated back to the States and had surgery to fix the fractured bone. He worked extremely hard in therapy, pushing himself, striving to get back to his unit and contribute to the mission. He never complained about the pain in rehab and was always positive and supported the efforts of other guys that he met in the OT clinic with encouraging words and a motivated - "leading from the front" example. When he was finally cleared by his orthopedic surgeon to redeploy he was happy to finally be able to return to his unit to do his duty. He could have easily gotten out of the deployment, but that wasn't Hutchins' style. On November the 9th, 2010 I was in my office at the hospital at 0730, answering early morning emails and taking my first sips of coffee, when one of my NCO's came in and asked if I'd heard about Hutchins. When I told him that I hadn't, my SGT related to me how he'd heard on the radio that a CPL Andrew Hutchins had been killed by small arms fire in Afghanistan. I did a quick Google search of the mornings news and in fact found that the Andrew Hutchins that had worked so hard to rehabilitate his wrist had been shot and killed the day before in a fire fight. I was stunned. All I could do was sit and stare at the headlines on the computer screen. Even before this horrible news, Hutchins was going to be one of those guys that I would never forget due to his amazing attitude and work ethic, not to mention his remarkable recovery from wrist surgery. Later that day I made up my mind that I needed to honor the memory of Hutchins in some way. When one of my patients showed me a Memorial Bracelet that he had for another fallen hero, I knew instantly what I had to do. A few days later, I checked the website and found Hutchins' name and vowed to order the bracelet. I received my bracelet with CPL Andrew Hutchins' name engraved on it yesterday and immediately slipped it onto my wrist. I have a feeling that it is going to be a part of me for a very long time, probably for as long as his memory is a part of me

Anonymous

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January 4, 2011

I got my Memorial Bracelet just after Christmas, for a member of my father's family. SP4 Gary R. Hinther USA June 29, 1968 SVN, from Montana. I am very happy with it. I just wanted to thank you! This is a wonderful way to remember the ones that have fought for our country, but never made it home. This way at least their memory lives on & we can take our family members with us where ever we go. God bless America!!!! We are strong, proud & will always protect our freedom.

2010

Anonymous

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November 6, 2010

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet for a very specific person and a very specific reason. I know most people order them for relatives, but I did it for somebody even more important. There are very few people who would consider Matt important or a big part of their lives, but even if I don't deserve to, I want to be one of them. Matt was killed in action on August 31, 2010 at the age of 22. I had known him since he was 17 (I was 21 at the time) and we were both working together at Kmart. He very quickly became the person that you could talk to. Even after I got promoted to his boss, he was still somebody I could lean on and be myself around. He'd helped me move, spent time with me during the holidays when I was all alone, and been a major support system in my life. Matt and I had a strange relationship. We were close friends. Almost like brother and sister at times (when he was married, I was the only one he talked to about it). Later it turned out that he, at least, was interested in more. After I moved back to MN we rarely talked, but when we did it was baring our souls. He came to visit me for his 21st birthday. While he was up here, he declared his love for me to everybody at the local bar. Think he could have told me first? He witnessed (and was instrumental in) my baby sister (2 days younger than him) meeting her now husband. I regret that he never knew that they were married. While he was up here, I spurned his advance because I didn't see him as mature enough. He even left without saying Goodbye to me. He gave me a call while he was in basic and proposed to me. Multiple times. Once he had gotten out, I really may have considered it. We lost touch in the year after he completed AIT. When I found out about his sacrifice, I was heartbroken and saddened. I regret not talking to him more, not being nicer, losing touch, and underrating him. Matthew George always wanted to be in the military on the front lines. He wanted to be somebody. To mean something. Well, even if he never knew it, he was somebody and he meant something to me. I pray that he knows how I feel and how proud I am of him. My punk made a difference!

Gwen Hall D.

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November 5, 2010

I wear the pow/mia bracelet of my brother, Capt. Harley H. Hall, the last Navy pilot shot down on Jan.27, 1973 hours before the cease fire was signed. He was the Blue Angels leader from "70-71" and up for the astronaut program. He was alive on the ground! His back seater came home.

Dawn M. G.

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September 20, 2010

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet for my lifelong friend, Michael Barnhill. We grew up together in a very small town, so when I heard he was killed in Iraq, it was like losing a member of my family. I will wear this Memorial Bracelet to honor him as a hero and his sacrifice for this country, to remember him as a friend and good man that he was and to never forget what this country has gone through and sacrificed since September 11. Always Remember, "All gave some, some gave all".

Malcolm H.

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September 14, 2010

My name is Malcolm and I have had the honor to wear several of your Memorial Bracelets in recent times. I bought one in honor of SSGT Matt Maupin whose Aunt attended a church my family was also attending in Cincinnati. I was privileged to give it personally to his mother on the day that his remains were returned to her.

Steve B.

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September 12, 2010

I wear my Memorial Bracelet for my best friend's son. His name is Sgt. Brandon E. Adams, & he gave his life fighting in Iraqi Freedom, on 19 Sept. 2004. Brandon was such a great kid, with a great smile. I fondly remember bouncing him on my knee when he was a little boy. Brandon, & his family moved away from our home town, & I hadn't seen him in a few years, but I'll never forget the day his Dad called me, & told me of his death. It hit me hard! I'll never forget that day. I bought my Memorial Bracelet, & wear it in his honor. He was definitely one of "America's Heroes", & I'll never forget him, or his ultimate sacrifice.

Mark M.

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September 9, 2010

Almost 7 years ago or so I ordered a 9/11 Memorial Bracelet from you guys for a firefighter I knew who passed away on Sept 11th 2001. I wore that bracelet every day. It never came off of my wrist no matter what I was doing. I would go thru metal detectors at the airport and refuse to take it off and took the wand treatment instead. I wore it thru the fire academy to remind me that some gave everything so I should give my all. It was like my own little cheerleader telling me to keep going when the academy got hard. The bracelet of Angel Juarbe Jr rode on my right hand until I lost an even closer friend in Iraq in 2007. I then moved Angels bracelet to my fire helmet where it remained until someone stole it from my helmet. But long story short, it was a great reminder as to never forget the ones we love and never forget what they gave up for us. Thank you to your company for such a great product. It held up to everything I put it thru at the fire house. I hope to never HAVE to order another bracelet, but if I do it will definitely be from you guys!

Anonymous

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September 8, 2010

When I was 15 years old, my sister was married to someone in the Air Force, and they were stationed on Lackland Base in San Antonio. During a visit there, she gave me a bracelet with the name of Robert Lilies on it, MIA. I wore it then, with a prayer for his return, and in honor of all people serving. I was so young and a product of the time not believing in the war. HOWEVER, as I said, I was young and had no real knowledge of what was going on. All I knew was that I would stand behind proudly our "boys" going thru hell, and even death, for us. I know I wore it for at least 2 or 3 years. When I finally took it off, I remember putting it with some cherished items, but somehow thru the years, it was lost. A few weeks ago, my hubby and I were watching a PBS show re: the 1960's. With pictures of the Vietnam War on, I remembered my POW/MIA bracelet. It occurred to me that with internet, I could find his name somewhere listed as an MIA. I did find his name, but under KIA. As I read the info that was on his bracelet, it all came back to me. Additionally, I was able to read more info re: where he was from, Louisiana, and info re: his crash. I cried. Thirty-eight years have passed. I am no longer a youth with all of life ahead of me, but I have enjoyed a very good life...much in part due to freedom I have known my entire life. I am blessed with 3 sons, one of which has served in The Air Guard for 10 years. A mother's heart is thankful he has not been called to go to Iraq...how could I not honestly be? However, he may be going in less than a year. He has been more than ready to go and do his part as his "brothers" have. If that does occur, God will get me thru it as He has been faithful to do thru the generations. I am waiting for my new POW/MIA Bracelet from Memorial Bracelets in the mail excitedly. As 38 years ago, I will wear it in memory of Robert Lilies, a man I never met, but is so special in my heart. How I wish I could have contact with a family member! I believe he would be 70 years old today, had he lived. I will wear the bracelet in thanks to all military, who have served that I have lived free. I will wear the bracelet proudly in honor of my son, Seth Allen Mason. And lastly, I will wear it until it falls apart, as a constant reminder to pray for all of the above, and as a hope for a day of peace!

Athena M.

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July 9, 2010

My husband is active duty Army, and a veteran of 3 wars; the Gulf, Iraq and Afghanistan. We have two teenagers at home. If one of our kids decided to join the Army and follow in Dad's footsteps and, God Forbid, something like this happened to them, I would appreciate strangers honoring their memory in this way. The MIA I chose was 17-year-old PFC Wayne Bibbs. I would like to honor this young man's name and sacrifice. I will proudly display his name.

John Santy

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July 9, 2010

I picked Wayne's bracelet out of a box of them sight unseen at a Flag Memorial I attended. As I read it I got chills due to the fact that he and I shared June 14 as our birthday. I was in the 1st Cav at Hood and always felt I could've been him. The best I can do is have his bracelet permanently attached to the front of my Harley in the hopes he is riding with me.

James D. Bell

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July 5, 2010

Sgt. (Cpt.) Haskell was my drill instructor all through boot camp at PI. Grad. Dec. 15, 1971, plt. 199. He was a Marines-Marine. He was all business, and I remember him teaching me a few good things. He loved his country and the Marine Corps, and he demonstrated this with his ultimate sacrifice for such. I will never forget Sgt. Haskell as I knew him-always ready-always alert-always gun ho-always a MARINE. He has been in my thoughts for years as have others I graduated with and had as drill instructors, (Ssgt. John Denny and Sgt. T. Kenton. I was disturbed to hear of his death, but I can assure you it was not in vain. My prayers and thoughts go out to his family, he was a brother of mine. 

Jim Patrick

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July 5, 2010

SSgt Haskell was my SDI in Plt 1028 (Nov. '72-Feb '73). He took over from Sgt Gomez in around the beginning of January, '73 while we were on mess duty. Until he took over, we were heading nowhere fast, but after he took over, he instilled pride and discipline in us and we began taking everything on the island. He was especially proud when we took series Drill Comp. I'll never forget his unique cadence and his evening school circles where he would slide his overstuffed chair onto the quarterdeck after lights out and, in a low voice, call school circle, and then quietly talk to us man to men, telling us what we did good on and where we needed improvement. It became a team effort and we strived to be our best for him. I was saddened to hear of his death. Can anyone tell me the particulars of his death and perhaps his career path from 1973 on? There is no one more influential in my life than SSgt. Haskell. He helped mold me into the Marine I became and the man I am. I consider myself incredibly lucky that he came to us when he did and I owe him a debt of gratitude.

Ric Van Norton

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July 5, 2010

Mike Haskell and I were both Drill Instructors in B Company, 1st RTBn at MCRD PISC. He had a blue Mustang Convertible and I had a Green Mustang. We both made SSgt during that time. I last saw Mike while he was serving at 8th and I. I was a Plt Sgt accompanying a Candidate Company to the Evening Parade from OCS at Quantico. I was in Okinawa as a 1stSgt in 1983 when I learned of his death from an article in The Stars and Stripes. He was one of the finest Marines I ever served with. I retired in 1991 as a SgtMaj. RIP my friend. you will never be forgotten by anyone that ever had the honor of serving with you.

Archie L. O'Neal

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July 5, 2010

Mike Haskell and I went through Drill Instructor School together (Class 6-71) Mike was the Honor Graduate and received the NCO sword for his accomplishments. We were both assigned to Bravo Company 1st RTBN. Although we worked in the same series several times. We only worked together for one platoon 1028 in 1973. Mike was known for his professionalism but for his very unique haircut. I spoke with him for the last time just before his Company deployed to Beruit. I was saddened by the loss of this Marine and all the others. SEMPER FI Mike RIP

SSG Jimmy Ray H.

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July 4, 2010

The day I got my Memorial Bracelet I went into my office and cried when I opened it. I met Donnie through SSG Brooks. We were in Ba'Qubah, Iraq during the surge in 2007. Donnie was part of the PSD team for the BDE CDR and I was on the PSD/LRT for the DCO. Casualties where very heavy that summer. We lost so many to IED's, Suicide bombers, and small arms fire. I went to more Hero flights than I want to remember. Out of all of the folks we lost Donnie was one I could put a voice to a face and face to the litter that was carried to the chopper. We had a few conversations over dinner in the DFAC and even though I didn't know him as well as I wish I could have, I swore after his death that I would never let the snipers bullet silence his memory. Rest in Peace Donnie D. Dixon.

Anonymous

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June 20, 2010

I ordered my Memorial Bracelet to honor a dear friend, Sgt Donald J. Lamar II who was killed in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan on May 12. To myself, our friends and the rest of the community Donald is a true American Hero and will live on in our hearts forever, and now not only will he be in my heart forever, but I'm able to celebrate his life and his sacrifice each day with this bracelet on my wrist!

Greg C.

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June 16, 2010

The idea of me of wearing my bracelet originally came from my uncle, who is still on active duty with the Army for over 20 years. He has worn his bracelet for over 8 years. I have always had a great respect for anyone that has served in any armed forces, that allows me to live my life without fear in our great country. I wanted to wear a name that is from my home state of Kentucky, and I came across Col Charles E. Shelton. After ordering my bracelet, I began to research Col. Shelton and began to find a man with an amazing story. I studied all I could about him so I may pass on his story and educate anyone that asks about my bracelet. I love the fact that I can speak about him and honor his name and family on a daily basis. President Reagan once said "A country that forgets is fighting men, is a country that in itself will be forgotten." And I find this holds true every day, especially for all the men and women who gave their lives for our freedom. I wear my bracelet to never forget and to spread the awareness to whom might take their liberties for granted. I am honored and privileged to wear my bracelet every day and to never let anyone ever forget Col. Charles E. Shelton from Owensboro, Ky.

Anonymous

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June 16, 2010

I too have a POW/MIA bracelet with the name of Col. Charles E. Shelton. I got my bracelet in 1970 when they first came out. I am proud to wear his name and tell people mostly the younger kids about what it represents and that he fought for our country with pride. Today is Veteran’s day and along with Col. Shelton I will be remembering my Father who fought in WWII and all who are fighting for our country today. May God speed and keep them safe and bring them home to their loved ones.

Vivian J. Howard

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June 16, 2010

I also wear Col Shelton's bracelet because his brother is my best Friend. I keep hoping and praying that one day he will return. May God be with you Charles where ever you might be. In Heaven, I'm sure. Looking forward to meeting you if you do return.

Seaman Bright

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June 16, 2010

I also wear the bracelet with Col. Shelton's name. I do not remember the year I began to wear it. I received it at a LZ Bluegrass event honoring Vietnam Vets. It has become a part me. I was honored to find his name inscribed on the Vietnam memorial, at Highland Memory Garden in Mount Washington, KY, where I live. I have left instructions for either my son or one of my granddaughters to wear it after I am gone. I served on the USS Forestal(CVA-59) during the fire when she was on her Wespac cruise. I consider it an honor to wear the bracelet. Today I visited the moving wall and found Col Shelton's as well as the names of the 134 men who died on 29 JUL 67 because of the fire and explosions that day.

Flechsig Adam L.

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June 9, 2010

Andres H. Perez was a wonderful young man. We became friends our freshman year of high school back in 1997. We played football and had many classes together throughout school. A great student and awesome lineman on the field and in the weight room, serious when needed and happy as hell the rest of the time! He was my "brown buddy" and I his "white buddy". Such a happy, smart, caring person that made an impact on many lives. In 2001 right out of high school, Andres enlisted and began his journey with the Marines and went and fought the fight in OIF. He was unfortunately killed in Al Anbar Province, Iraq on November 14, 2004 due to a IED. He was laid to rest back in our home town of Santa Cruz, Ca where he is not forgotten, you can go there any time of the year and find the flowers or flags left behind for one of our American heroes. His memory will never be erased from my memory and as I do my time in the Army I do it for him and this great nation. 

Robert W.

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June 7, 2010

The reason I chose Kevin Cahill is because I knew him. He was a neighbor and friend during my years during elementary school. I worked with his Uncle and was saddened to learn of his death in Vietnam. I will wear the bracelet to preserve his memory.

LT T

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June 3, 2010

I wear a Memorial Bracelet for SGT Dale Griffin, KIA 27 OCT 2009 in AFG. I wear it because I was there when he and six other Soldiers were killed by an IED. It is a constant reminder to me on a big level of why we fight, and a reminder to always try to be the kind of standup guy Dale was. There are lessons we learn from all the friends we have and all the friends we lose. It falls on those of us who are still here to make sure that those we have lost are not forgotten.

Nicky W.

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June 2, 2010

One of my best friends was killed on October 1st, 2009. SPC Russell Hercules, Jr. He was a great person and always knew how to make someone laugh. When he was around, there was never a dull moment. I wish everyone would have had the chance to meet him. It's especially a hard thing for me to deal with because my husband and I welcomed our first baby at 6:03 am on October 1st and I got the devastating phone call at 9pm that same night. But he died doing something he loved and believed in. The Memorial Necklace will remind me of that and it is something I will wear every day.

Sara Joiner E.

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May 31, 2010

I ordered the Memorial Bracelet for me to wear in memory of my husband's best friend, Willard D. "Dale" Marshall, who was killed in Viet Nam in 1968. The dog tag is for my husband to place with the Memorial Wall rubbing of Dale's name.

Uncle Gary

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May 26, 2010

I will wear my Memorial Bracelet forever in honor of my hero, my nephew PFC Aaron J. Ward. He had only served in the Army just under a year and had already decided he was going to be a career soldier. He was young and loved the uniform, the Army and most of all his country. Aaron was born on 4/29/89 and was Killed In Action on 5/6/08 which was a week after his 19th birthday. He was a fantastic kid that everyone that knew him loved him and for such a short period here with us he sure touched so many people. I learned from a fellow soldier the following "All Soldiers are Heroes and Heroes never die, they just muster at a separate rally point and move on to the next objective! So 5/6/08 will forever be remembered as "Aaron's Heroism" to me, his uncle, the family and his friends that still visit and call his mom. You are thought of often and loved even more, Forever Young Kid.

Melissa H.

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May 26, 2010

I wear a Memorial Bracelet for my beautiful fiancé, Army 2LT Peter Burks, who was killed November 14, 2007, in Baghdad, Iraq. I wear it to keep him close to my heart, and to share his story with people that ask me what the bracelet stands for. I wear it to spark awareness with fellow Americans who might forget that we're still fighting this war, and to support the soldiers defending us downrange. I wear it as a link to Pete's unit, 4/2 SCR, and as a tribute to all veterans. I wear it as a reminder that "we are under the control of a good God, no matter what the circumstances," as Pete once said. I wear it to remain vigilant in daily life, and to show gratitude for the reasons our flag flies proudly in the American sky. I wear it as a link to the Army of Angels who paid the ultimate price for people that might never even know their names. Most of all, I wear my Memorial Bracelet as a representation of Heavenly love wrapped up in the 26 short years Pete shared here on earth. "Toujours Pret."

Brenda V

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May 24, 2010

I never met 1LT Brian Bradshaw and I do not know his family. I wear his Memorial Bracelet because he was the first officer to die shortly after I arrived in Afghanistan last year. When I read his story and discovered that he grew up near my home town and did similar things growing up as I did, I was deeply touched! Also, Michael Jackson died the same day 1LT Bradshaw was killed and the pop star was all over the news and not a mention about this American hero was anywhere to be found. This was upsetting to me so I decided to purchase 1LT Bradshaw's bracelet to honor him in a way Michael Jackson will never be honored. Additionally, 1LT Bradshaw is buried in the same National Cemetery as my father. When I go home this summer to visit family and attend my daughter's high school graduation, I am going to go visit 1LT Bradshaw when I go to spend time with my Dad at Mount Tahoma National Cemetery. It is a shame that we have young men and women dying every day in combat and they barely make the news anymore. But, when a celebrity dies they are immortalized forever. Rest in Peace 1LT Brian Bradshaw. God Bless your family!

Anonymous

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May 20, 2010

21 May 2010, is the 43rd anniversary of the death of Cpl. Robert Katavolos USMC. A member of Mike Co. / 3rd BN / 9th Marines. Their "TAOR" Tactical Area of Responsibility was Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. Where on 21 May 67, he gave his life for his country. We went to grade school together, hung out as teenagers together and joined the US Marine Corps together on the same day. We both served in South Vietnam in 1967 but in different units and were both "Grunts" 0311 Riflemen. Marines never forget our fallen brothers and Cpl. Robert Katavolos was more like part of my family. I will wear his KIA Bracelet proudly, to me it means much more than a simple bar of Stainless Steel with a name. Please take a minute of silence in his memory and if you ever go to "The Wall" in Washington, DC. His name can be found on (Panel-20-East/Line 76). May he be resting in peace and remain in our hearts.

Patrick H.

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April 30, 2010

I served with nacho Atanasio Haro-Marin in Iraq. I was one of four soldiers who pulled him off the streets of Balad when he was KIA. A lot of people got medals for that night, but a lot of us just lost a good friend and brother.

D. Torvinen

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March 15, 2010

Where I work in Connecticut, back in 2007, I met a Marine Patrick Brill who had served in Vietnam in the late 60's. I had shown him the web page I had created and on the site I had put a link to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Page where I showed him that you can look up any casualty of Vietnam, see when and where they were killed and where they are on The Wall. He had asked me to look up Pfc Albert Erskine, this was a fellow Marine he had went through Boot camp with and eventually served in Nam with. On 21 February 69 while in Vietnam, they had drawn straws to see who would go to a line Company. Patrick had drawn the shortest straw but Albert offered to take his place and go to the line Company. Five days later Pfc Albert Erskine was killed in Quang Nam by small arms fire. For 38 years Patrick has been feeling a heavy burden of guilt, feeling he was responsible for the death of his friend. He asked me to print out the info off the Vietnam Veterans Memorial site for Albert that I had shown him from my Blackjack phone, which I was pleased to do for him and I told him I do everything I can for our veterans. I not only printed out the info but arranged it on an 8 ½ x 11 piece of cardstock to be framed. With this printout I gave him other info I found on Albert's info page such as comments posted by people to include one listed by a buddy from NY who had put in his address and email. Through this info, Patrick had been put in contact with Albert's father, and Patrick had drove to NY to meet. Patrick had told me his father was a very nice man and he told him he was sorry and expressed how he felt for the past 38 years. Alberts father had assured him it was not his fault. In February 2010 after following the link on the Veterans Memorial page, I had told Patrick about Memorial Bracelets and that you can get anyone that was on the wall on a bracelet, I thought he would want one with Albert Erskine on it for the sacrifice he had made, and I was right, Pat asked me to get him one. One day after working 1st shift, I went to the Post office to check my mail and found it had arrived. With Patrick on 3rd shift and I wanted to get this to him right away, I waited until 9 pm I went to work to give it to him. He was very pleased with the bracelet and after reading it he put it on and said, "You know, you’re not supposed to take these off once you put them on." I'm sure whether you’re supposed to or not, but I don't think he would ever take the bracelet off. This is why I have purchased a bracelet and I am very pleased with the quality of it. Thank You.

James

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March 9, 2010

I wear my Memorial Bracelet because Justin was the one who put me into the life I love. He helped me become the best. I wear it because I don't want people to forget the horrible things that are going on over there. I just don't want to forget my friend. I wear my bracelet to remember my Friend and peer LCpl Justin Swanson. RIP Devil Dog, you’re guarding St. Peter's Gates now.

Rob D.

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February 25, 2010

I was blessed to have served with SGT. Daniel Sesker with C Troop 1-113th Cavalry in support of OIF 05-06. He was one of the most selfless people I have ever had the privilege of knowing. By wearing a Memorial Bracelet I get the opportunity to tell everyone that asks about it what a wonderful person he was and how much he will always be missed. It's my little way of making sure that his sacrifice wasn't in vain.

Anonymous

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February 15, 2010

I wear my Memorial Bracelet in honor of my son, Spc Ryan C. King who was killed in Afghanistan May 1, 2009. He was a wonderful son and proud soldier who will never be forgotten.

Anonymous

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February 10, 2010

I never knew Trevor, and I know that I'm much poorer because of that. I know his father, and I know what he's doing in Trevor's memory to help wounded service members and their families will leave a legacy that as big and important as it is, will always fall just short of the things Trevor would have achieved. RIP Sgt Trevor "Blum" Blumberg.

SGT Michael R. M.

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February 4, 2010

I recently made a Memorial Bracelet in memory of Captain John R. Teal, KIA Oct 23 2003, Baquaba Iraq. Here is one story of a man I knew for a short period of time, but admired greatly. We were all deployed in March of 2003, during the invasion, for 13 months. Our outfit was a Civil Affairs Battalion attached to the 4ID, 2BCT. Other CA teams in our battalion were split up amongst the whole Division spread out across the area they were assigned too; we didn't see our own Battalion as a whole, until we redeployed back to the States once we left Kuwait in March 2003. Upon taking the airfield which was Camp Warhorse (Camp Freedom now), after entering Baquaba, it became readily apparent we would need to move closer to the populace in order to be more affective. Shortly thereafter convincing the commanders, we did move to a blown-out government building in the middle of Baquaba with a population of 450,000+. However with this responsibility came extra personnel to help, the 2BCT sent military intelligence folks, Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), some infantry folks for guard-post on the roof, PYSOP, and some extra officers, just to name a few. It was also a place where SF and sniper teams would come in between night missions to change-up, adjust gear, brief us on enemies, get a bite, etc. This where we all met John. At first many of us NCO's were a little skeptical of another officer coming to live with us not being from one of the other outfits mentioned above, as we thought he might be there to "keep eyes on us". We didn't do anything wrong, but our community was a tight-knit band of soldiers, from many different backgrounds, charged with many responsibilities, and a commander from the 2BCT that expected results yesterday. Our team alone had 1.3 million American dollars funneled through our hands for various projects to get this city back on its feet, and there were multiple teams at the CMOC. Baquaba held elections a full year before the highly publicized ones of 2005, all because of this great group of professionals we worked with. John was right there all along in the thick of it; facilitating, coordinating, adjusting, showing us he was one of the best at this business. One night I was walking down the hallway and I heard a sound all grandchildren of Italian immigrants growing up in the 70's and 80's knew all too well, Old Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra. It was coming from Cpt. Teal's room. I walked in with a big smile on my face, and we yapped about him, from then on, we connected very well. He had many DVD's and CD's that we exchanged and listened too, as well as all the goodies that somehow officers always seem to have, snacks, hot plates, etc. You couldn't help to notice when walking into his room, a big cardboard cut-out of this gorgeous chick, the kind you see at liquor stores, or bars, smack dab in the middle of his room. After a while I asked, "Sir who sent that to you?", he told me "My girlfriend" I told him it must be a pretty special woman, he replied "You are looking at her." I laughed taking it as joke but he was serious, and showed me a picture of them two. John had that "it", that ability, attitude, looks, a smooth cat that loved sunglasses with all the combinations in life to be a success and he knew how to use all of them to his advantage. We worked out on the roof at night all of us, after daily missions, late so no enemies could see us, John had his mountain bike on a trainer, and let us all use it. A 1000-dollar mountain bike being used by multiple people, John was generous. I'll never forget one night we got mortared, and when the flash went off before the blast, I saw a silhouette of John pedaling his ass off amongst the darkness, I couldn't help but laugh as I took cover. Funny thing how you just laugh when you get attacked sometimes. The day of October 23, 2003 was a day I know none of us will ever forget. It started with an attack at the back gate, that Cpt. Teal was pulling security on. Attacks on our compound were common place, you have a compound in the middle of a 450,000+ city, even if you take say 1% of people that don't like us and attack us, that is still 4500 people. After the attack people geared up to go on missions. At the last second, we got pulled off our mission and placed on another one. Cpt. Teal and two others; Sgt Jared Myers, and Sgt Charles "Chuck" Bartles took our place on that mission. I don't know the details about the blast as I wasn't there but I do know that Jared Myers is a hero, John died instantly, and Chuck, who was the gunner up top, on top of being cut up pretty badly, lost his arm. Jared several miles from the CMOC with a broken leg, lacerations, and in obvious shock drove the damaged vehicle back to safety. Jared do not ever forget your efforts that day, and certainly do not discredit them, what you did in the face of adversity is simply mind blogging brother. I only aspire to be 1/8 the man that Jared, Chuck, and Cpt. Teal are. When we came back later in the day from our mission, and saw the vehicle sitting there on the grounds of the compound and found what happened, to this day I can't describe the feeling I had, I was numb. Not many days go by that I don't think of John, and all the other guys on OIF 1 with me, and it truly scares me to think it was my teams' mission they were on. I am extremely lucky, but at the same time guilty. There are times when I look at my daughter (who was born when I was in Iraq) playing, and laughing and think of John, Jared, and Chuck and think how close man, how close. To the family, I truly am sorry for your loss, may God bless you, and watch our you with love and care, as John most certainly is as well.

Brad D. L.

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February 2, 2010

I started wearing a POW/MIA bracelet in the early 70s when my father gave one to me just after his return from SE Asia. I remember breaking it in half when the guy returned. Later on, I was assigned as a Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in 1988 and picked up a new bracelet down at the Vietnam memorial, for a CPT Cecil C. Perkins, who was MIA in Vietnam. I wore that until I lost the bracelet in Iraq in 2007. I was putting on my body armor to board a helicopter and didn’t notice the bracelet had come off until after arriving back at my camp. I decided to purchase a replacement for the one I lost but instead, decided to get a bracelet with the name of a friend of mine who was killed in action in Iraq, CW3 Mitch Carver. I don’t want to ever forget his service and his friendship.

SGT Darryl Zimmerman

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February 1, 2010

It has taken me three years to breakdown and order my Memorial Bracelet, for my fallen Marine. His name was LCpl Dennis Veater. I was his Cpl in charge of him throughout our deployment. His death did not sit well with me and still doesn't. I have blamed a lot of people along with myself for it. I will be visiting his grave for the first time since I last saw him alive 3 years coming in March. I will wear this bracelet proudly and hope he and his family know I have never forgotten that day. He was a great Marine and friend. Semper Fi.

Anonymous

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January 28, 2010

I am a C-17 pilot in the Air Force. On my first mission as an aircraft commander I arrived at Bagram to find a welcoming party with instructions for a "fallen heroes" ceremony. I had the sad honor of carrying Captain Joshua Meadows (USMC) and Sgt Randy Haney (US Army) out of the combat zone in the beginning of September 2009. Those ceremonies are always a sobering moment and we see far too many of them. It was evident that they were loved members of their units and they were honored as such on the ramp in the middle of the night at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. I have carried heroes home before and I know that I will, again, but I thought that it would be a fitting way for me to honor all of those that have lost their lives downrange by wearing these 2 names on my arm. I will never forget that night. God bless their families and all of those that have lost a loved one in the fight.

Anonymous

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January 28, 2010

I am a C-17 pilot in the Air Force. On my first mission as an aircraft commander I arrived at Bagram to find a welcoming party with instructions for a "fallen heroes" ceremony. I had the sad honor of carrying Captain Joshua Meadows (USMC) and Sgt Randy Haney (US Army) out of the combat zone in the beginning of September 2009. Those ceremonies are always a sobering moment and we see far too many of them. It was evident that they were loved members of their units and they were honored as such on the ramp in the middle of the night at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. I have carried heroes home before and I know that I will, again, but I thought that it would be a fitting way for me to honor all of those that have lost their lives downrange by wearing these 2 names on my arm. I will never forget that night. God bless their families and all of those that have lost a loved one in the fight.

Kevin M.

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January 26, 2010

My first cousin Maj. Curtis Dan Miller was shot down over Laos on March 29, 1972 while flying a C-130-gun ship. Their mission was to search out and destroy supply trucks on the Ho Chi Ming trail in Laos, a supply line to North Viet Nam when they were hit by a missile called a flying telephone pole. There were reports of beeper signals from parachutes, so our hope was always that Dan would be found alive someday. Although the chance of him escaping the flight deck of a C-130 was highly impossible from the reports of nearby support aircraft of the severe hit the C-130 received from the missile. My first POW Bracelet was silver and I wore it throughout High School and at college, which was followed by a red one and it always received attention from people not sure of its meaning. This past year Dan was identified through bone fragments that the USAF had excavated from his crash site after his immediate family protested the planned burial of several unidentified bone fragments in a grave with the names of the five members from his aircraft that had not been personally identified from previous tests. Since they have now identified a bone fragment as Major Curtis Dan Millers, his service is scheduled on the day he went missing 38 years later. By wearing the Killed In Action bracelet at his Funeral/Memorial service it will give me a chance to take a step forward in realizing that he like many others will never return and wearing the KIA bracelet will always remind anyone who asks, that there are sacrifices that we endure for the freedom that so many take so lightly.

Susan P Young

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January 26, 2010

I have had my POW/MIA bracelet for Capt Curtis Dan Miller since the mid 70's when the bracelets first became available. I wore it every day for several years, eventually saving it in my jewelry box. I did not know him, but still his name was kept close to my heart. I have visited the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in DC many times and have found his name on the wall wondering if he had been found. I was so surprised to hear his name on the news yesterday that he had been identified and returned to his family. My condolences to his family and my relief as well that he has come home at long last. I plan pay him tribute this Memorial Day and place his bracelet at his name on The Wall. Thank you, Major Miller, for your service and sacrifice to the great nation.

Cheryl M Brown

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January 26, 2010

Dan graduated in 1964 from the small Texas town of Palacios. He was one of 50 graduates. Several of our classmates also served in Viet Nam. One actually was on the search party of Dan’s crash. Many of our classmates are planning on attending his funeral and burial in Ft. Worth and Dallas. We plan to never forget Dan. "You are not dead until you are forgotten."

Vivian S. McFarland

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January 26, 2010

When I heard the news report “Major Curtis Dan Miller remains to be buried 38 years after being shot down in Viet Nam”, I knew immediately that this was my POW. The man who's name I proudly wore on a metal bracelet for years. I wore that bracelet in an effort to support our troops and to keep them present in our memories. He is at last brought home to his family and his country, the country he lost his life in protecting. I will look at this bracelet now a little differently. It is now the proud reminder of a man who gave his everything for people he would never know, but I will never forget him. God bless our troops.

Anonymous

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January 26, 2010

For eight years I wore my bracelet for Captain Curtis Dan Miller. When I visited the Vietnam Memorial I approached the wall not knowing it his name would be there. It was, as Major Curtis Dan Miller. Until today, I had never seen his picture or knew his story. I just knew I had faith that someday we would know. My heart goes out to his family, his wife and daughter. May you be at peace and know that many people prayed for Major Curtis Dan Miller.

Robin Taylor

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January 26, 2010

I, too, wore a POW bracelet during the 70's, with Capt. Curtis Dan Miller's name. At the time we were instructed to return the POW bracelet to the family when the serviceman returned home. Capt. Miller never did. Then, 2 days ago I learned through an anonymous post on my blog, that his remains were returned to Texas, in 2010. With all my heart I would like to return this bracelet to Susan and his daughter. So, if anyone can help me contact them I would be very grateful!

Anonymous

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January 20, 2010

I have ordered the Memorial Bracelets to wear in honor of my Grandson PFC Brian R. Bates, Jr. who was killed in action in Afghanistan on October 27, 2009. He leaves behind a wife and 2 beautiful children who will never know what their father did for them and all Americans to keep us free. Brian has received the Bronze Medal of Honor and the Purple Heart along with numerous other medals and awards. He will never be forgotten.

Anonymous

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January 9, 2010

Charlie was my nephew and lost his life in Afghanistan 07 Nov 09. He was considered a true warrior. Charlie had only been married 11 months. I will NEVER forget this brave young man. I wear the Memorial Bracelet so others will ask why, and I can share my story of our beloved Charlie.

Gabe Haugland

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January 4, 2010

This weekend was my first training assembly with my new platoon. I really enjoyed getting to know the guys, and training was successful, but perhaps the moment that left the most lasting impression was walking through the Bravo Company awards room. The room is full of history, from photos of Bravo Company, 168 Infantry Regiment soldiers in WWII to awards received as an exemplary unit throughout the various campaigns. My unit’s history is truly spectacular. The 168 Infantry Regiment most recently deployed to Ghazni Province, Afghanistan in 2004, where SGT James C. Kearney III was killed-in-action on November 1 of that year. SGT Kearney was manning the gunner’s hatch of his vehicle when his convoy was ambushed by small arms and RPGs on that day. Though “Task Force 1-168″ operated mainly in Ghazni, this particular convoy had taken them into Paktika province and towards the border with Pakistan when they were attacked. SGT Kearney was a member of 1st Platoon – the platoon I am currently assigned to – and his memory will be carried with us into Afghanistan.

2009

Fred

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December 30, 2009

I wear my Memorial Bracelet in honor of PFC Ronald L. Coker of Alliance, NE which is 60 miles from Scottsbluff, NE where I live. PFC Coker was Killed 24 March 1969 in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. PFC Coker was wounded by small arms fire and 3 grenades while he rescued a fellow Marine who had been wounded earlier. Despite PFC Coker's numerous he brought his comrade back to safety and died of his wounds shortly after. For his heroic actions on that day, PFC Ronald L. Coker was awarded the Medal of Honor. 40 years after his death, the road leading to the veteran’s cemetery in Alliance, NE was named Ronald Coker Road.

Dave

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December 29, 2009

When I was a freshman in an AFJROTC unit I was reading an article in Airman magazine about a school that turns men into supermen. It was an article about the rigors of Air Force Pararescue training and they followed one PJ candidate, Jason D. Cunningham. When I was done with the article I knew that I had discovered something special. To me, this was the best job in the military. Their sole mission is to save people. For a freshman I was awestruck and had for a time that's all I wanted to be. I still entertain thoughts of trying to be one of these few that put their lives on the line for no other reason than "so that others may live." A maxim that we could all try to live by. About three years later I was reading an article in Air Force Times where a young Pararescueman by the name of Jason Cunningham was killed while trying to save the crew of a downed helicopter on the side of an afghan mountain. At first I was struck by a sense of familiarity. I knew the name, but couldn't put my finger on it. Searching through my archives of Air Force magazines I came across the original article. I was shocked and stunned. I was saddened by the fact that he was killed, but also somewhat happy because he made it through training and he was doing something that he loved. I ordered a Memorial Bracelet, will wear the band, so that we may never forget of the ultimate sacrifice. Giving one's life so "that others may live."

Nicholas B. Bradley

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December 15, 2009

My name is Nicholas B. Bradley and on 3 Aug 2008 I was operating a vehicle in a US convoy threw Kabul, Afghanistan when our vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb. Sgt. Jaime “Gonzo” Gonzalez was the passenger in my vehicle. He was also a close friend. This is the reason I wear a Memorial Bracelet.

Kathy M.

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December 14, 2009

In the 1970's, I wore a POW/MIA Bracelet with CAPT. David Smith's name (3-16-69). I still have it. Recently, I ordered Memorial dog tags with CPL. Rhett A. Butler's name (KIA 20 JUL 07 in Iraq). He was the son of a dear friend and also, I taught him in preschool. His name is on a monument in one of our local parks and his sacrifice will be remembered by generations to come. I will wear the dog tags engraved with his name to honor that sacrifice.

Anonymous

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December 10, 2009

My Dad was a career soldier who loved his country. He was a 1st SGT at the age of 26 and a SGM at the age of 36. At the age of 39 he went to Viet Nam and three weeks later he died. He left behind a wife and 7 children. My mom raised us alone with only her widow and war orphan allotment. My father was a true patriot and he gave his life for his country. He was a loving husband, father, son and brother. They made a mistake on how he died which resulted in him not receiving his purple heart. We are at the present time trying to locate anyone who might have served with him in Viet Nam.

Rich Risica

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December 10, 2009

I too worked with Sgt Major Sternkorb in Munich Germany. He was always someone I respected and honored. He was a true hero to me. I was with him 1966-1967. On training missions I used to be in charge of waking up the NCOs in the field. When I'd go to his bunk, before I could finish, "Sergeant Maj....." he would jump out of the sack. Like he was on duty in his sleep. He was a great guy. I didn't know that he died in August of 1967. I was discharged in Feb of 1968 and I thought he was still in Munich when I got out. But it was over 40 years ago and I must not remember well.

SP4 James Marshall

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December 10, 2009

I was a company clerk in the 24th Inf Div Headquarters Company in Augsburg and worked with Sgt Major Stirnkorb for almost two years. He was a fine man and one of the very few career military men I would have followed unhesitatingly into battle. I like him very much and was very sad to learn that he had passed.

Anonymous

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November 29, 2009

I order the Memorial Bracelets in remembrance of our fallen LCpl Daniel J. Geary who is and always will be our son and missed more than anyone will ever know. KIA 3/20/09.

Deb

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November 17, 2009

I ordered and will wear faithfully my Memorial Bracelet for PFC Patrick S. Fitzgibbon for several reasons. I have grown quite attached to his family and extended family and they have included me as a part of their family. I am a Senior Ride Captain with the Patriot Guard Riders so it’s not as if I have not handled KIA missions before as I have handled too many, but for some reason this particular family has grown roots in my heart, I love each and every one of them. I am sure that once the family sees this bracelet there will be more ordered from your business.

Mike

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October 5, 2009

I received the first order and the Memorial Bracelets are beautiful. Thanks for keeping this great thing that we did in the 60's and 70's alive and well. By the way, the first bracelet I ordered here was of a young kid, Charles Angrisani, who's grave I used to take care of when I was only 15 and working in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, NY. There was a picture of him smiling and I was always taken by the inscription his Mom had engraved on his stone. "Taken from us in the prime of his life preserving the God given right to freedom". I NEVER forgot it and I still frequent his grave. Even though I never knew him I always felt like I did.

Marla S

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August 5, 2009

I purchased, and have chosen to wear this Memorial Bracelet in remembrance of SFC David J Todd. Although I did not know him, he did in fact touch my life. I am a soldier in the National Guard and I was deployed to Afghanistan from April 2008 to Dec 2008. I acted as a medic while deployed and during this time I, and several others from my platoon were called on to act as pallbearers for two of our fellow soldiers who had been killed earlier that day. One of these soldiers was SFC Todd. I acted as his pallbearer and escorted him onto the aircraft that carried him home. I will always consider it a great honor and privilege to have been able to do that for him and his family. That is why I have chosen to wear this bracelet.

Christine

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July 13, 2009

I work for Weather's Moving and Storage in Fayetteville NC. I'm employed as a packer. SGT Ronald Coffelt's family was the first family I packed who's loved one was KIA. I really didn't want to be the one to pack the family, being a widow myself I know leaving the last home you lived in together can be difficult to say the least, but I did go out to pack the family and I'm so glad I did. We cried, we laughed, we hugged. I got to know Sgt Ronald Coffelt. The solider, the father, the husband. A man who died for our freedom. This is a move I will never forget. I bought the Memorial Bracelet to remember the fact that I had the honor to help and meet Sgt Ronald Coffelt's family.

Anonymous

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June 12, 2009

I ordered the Memorial Dog Tags for my wife whose uncle died in 1968 in Vietnam. While growing up her parents never talked about her uncle Charles Martin who died the Vietnam war. Both me and my wife feel that anyone who gives all for their country should be remembered and honored, and we want our kids to understand what it sometimes takes to keep us free. We feel all military men/women are our heroes and it is an honor to have so many in our family.

RET. SGT William Dreese

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March 10, 2009

My (distant) cousin, PFC Justin W. Dreese, of the 82nd Airborne, US Army, was killed in a mortar attack in Iraq, on 2 Sept 2006. I wear my Memorial Bracelet to honor his sacrifice, and the other (almost) 5,000 heroes from our nation's military services since 2001, that have "paid the last full measure of devotion" by laying their lives upon the altar of freedom. I wear it constantly, as an officer of my veteran chapter that is out in the community constantly.  

Anonymous

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February 6, 2009

When I was a kid my grandmother and both parents wore POW/MIA bracelets. I wanted one for myself when I got to be about 11 or 12 years old. I decided that I wanted a random name but a Marine as my father was (and still is) in the Marine Corps. I received a bracelet with the name of Sgt Samuel E. Hewitt. I lost the bracelet a few years later while swimming in the ocean but I never forgot the name. I took many trips to The Wall in D.C. and got rubbings of his name each time. I went off and joined the Marines myself and did two tours in Iraq. No matter how much I had going on, his name was never far from my thoughts. I made a promise to Sgt Hewitt some years ago to never forget. I never have and I never will. With or without a bracelet. The POW/MIA bracelet is just a reminder to others and to their families that they will never be forgotten. 

Merilee

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February 6, 2009

Bless your heart. I too wear Sammy's bracelet as he was a childhood friend of mine. We grew up in Indiana and Sam was so young when he went missing, but definitely one of America's finest. I think about him each day and wished for many years he would somehow turn up somewhere, somehow. I will never give up hoping, but he is in my heart and it's nice to know he is in yours as well.

Anonymous

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February 6, 2009

I wanted to continually remember Zach McBride, the son of a friend of mine who was KIA in Iraq in January 2008 during the surge of troops into the areas north of Baghdad. Zach was also a childhood playmate of my own son, who will receive his Army commission in 2010 and will probably face similar dangers. I think of all those killed in previous wars (WWII, WWI, etc.) who no one remembers except in the abstract. This remembrance however, is real. I knew Zach. One day those who knew Zach will be gone also. Until then I will keep faith with his memory and pray for my own son.

Anonymous

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February 6, 2009

I went to basic training and airborne school with Zach. He was a very quiet, but extremely likable guy. Never once did anyone have anything negative to say about him. He was a damn good soldier in basic and airborne school, and I can only imagine how much better he was in his unit. I custom ordered a bracelet with his name. I hope it comes soon.

2008

Jan

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December 27, 2008

I received the Memorial Bracelets I ordered and I loved them. I ordered them for my brother and nephew who loved them as well. My great nephew was killed by a roadside bomb June 25th 2008 in this ugly war that is going on. All we can hope and pray for is that it ends soon before more young lives are lost. I thank you for what you do in making the bracelets, I feel like it brings some comfort to those that have lost loved ones. I have a daughter in the Air National Guard so I will be getting one for myself as well just to show my support in what she does.

Paul

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December 23, 2008

I ordered this bracelet (LtCol Max Galeai, USMC KIA in Iraq) because Max was a good friend I'd served with twice before; in Hawaii and Okinawa, Japan. I'm also a USMC LtCol, and want to remember Max on a daily basis. He left behind a wonderful wife and four kids. He was blown up by a suicide bomber while meeting with a dozen tribal sheiks in Al Anbar province - the ones who turned the tide in favor of good over evil. Max was a part of that effort. They trusted him, and he them. The terrorists trusted neither, and while they may have massacred a number of noble men (both American and Iraqi), they were unable to kill the idea these men stood for. Max died a hero, and I want to remember him daily for it.

Steve Castibguay

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December 23, 2008

Not sure if you will see this. I worked for LtCol Max Galeai and we became friends. He sent me to Samoa to open a Marine Corps Recruiting Station there while I was in charge of recruiting in the Pacific. We traveled a lot together. I think of him often. He inspired me and the Marines of his unit to strive for excellence. I think of him often. He made a difference.

CPT Brian

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December 11, 2008

I am currently serving on a Transition Team in support of OIF. I received word in April that a close friend of mine (CPT Ullyses Burgos-Cruz) was killed during a mounted combat patrol while serving on a Military Transition Team in Iraq. Of course, I was shocked and still have my moments of grief over the loss of such a dear friend. I was also saddened further by the news that his wife was awaiting the birth of their first child and now would be doing so without him. I thought about it for a long time and then made the decision to honor the memory of Ullyses by having a Memorial Bracelet made to serve as a reminder of his ultimate sacrifice and selfless service, as well as those of so many others who have done the same. In life, he was one of the most positive and free spirited people I have ever met and he always had a smile and a cheerful hello to share with everyone that he met. He was a light in the darkness and could brighten even the darkest of days with his presence alone. He will be greatly missed and forever remembered both by myself and everyone else who came into contact with his contagiously positive and beautiful spirit!

Brandon

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December 11, 2008

I wear my Memorial Bracelet in honor of my friend Shane Patton. Shane died in Afghanistan defending our freedom during a mission that he volunteered to go on. Shane was proud of what he was doing and proud to be a SEAL. In honor of Shane my wife and I decided to name our son after him. I hope that my son will carry himself the way that Shane did. By wearing this bracelet, I honor, remember, and respect Shane and the sacrifice that he made for our country. Not only is this a constant reminder of Shane, but it is a reminder of everyone who has made a sacrifice in my behalf. I hope that all the servicemen and women who see it understand that it is an expression of gratitude to them. It is a meager offering, but I am grateful for them and their efforts on my behalf. Remembering those, especially Shane, that have sacrificed so much helps me stay humble and grateful for what I have in life. Remembering those that have fallen helps me remember that I enjoy life because of the freedom they defend. In life, Shane was a great man, but in death his legacy lives on. As long as there are warriors like Shane Patton, we will always have a true and free America.

Anonymous

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November 7, 2008

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet in remembrance of Leon Atteridge. He and I went to high school together. I joined the Navy in July 1964, served two Vietnam tours 1965 and 1966 and was discharged in 1967. Leon was drafted into the Army in 1967 and died in combat near Hue in Mar 1968. Folks now are epitomizing Iraq and Afghanistan vets yet seem to continue to forget Vietnam vets who died in an unpopular war. I decided to remind them all that there have been plenty of veterans of prior wars who also need to be remembered in their thoughts and prayers of thanks for the freedom we continue to enjoy.

Kellie

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November 7, 2008

We will wear our Memorial Bracelets in memory of our son, Sgt. John E. Allen, a Medic for the US Army. He was KIA, in Ghazaliah, Iraq, on 17 March 2007, by IED. Our son was a wonderful soul and so talented. He cared about people in a way that my husband and I, sometimes, couldn't understand. He brought kids to us that needed assistance with their parents/guardians or who just needed a place to call home for a while. We helped out in the lives of so many of the kids that John brought to us. For one of them, Brandy, we became official foster parents just to keep her safe and in our home. John was a born 'medic' whether it was for the physical body or the soul. He just knew what people needed. After high school, which he barely made the grade to graduate but he did, he went into the Navy. That was July 1999. He became a Fuelman/firefighter off of the USS Carl Vinson. He was in the Persian Gulf when 9/11 happened and most munitions came from his ship. He is a veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, too, which isn't reflected in his service records, for some reason. When he left the Navy, John wanted to become a police officer. Everything he had done; filling out apps, tests, background checks, etc., became lost somewhere in the mists of time. After 2 years, he said he was tired of all of the 'outside world and their expectations' and said he was going into the Army. He wanted to join the Airborne Division but he 'settled' for training as a medic. A really good choice for him! He was in the Medical Magnet in high school until his friends took over, if you know what I mean. John was a pain in the butt as a teenager but grew into a wonderful man right before my eyes as I watched him marry his wife on July 7, 2006. He became responsible and a loving husband and paid his bills, which he was kind of remiss before, and just was a joy to be around before he left for deployment in Iraq. I watched my son grow from a loving little boy, to an irresponsible teenager, to a caring young man, to a Navy personnel, to a frustrated young adult and finally to a man he was proud of being! When he died, I know he was proud of who he was and, as a mother, I was so proud of what he was, MY SON! I will love and miss him forever.

Anonymous

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November 5, 2008

I wear my son's bracelet to honor and remember him. He was my oldest child and I will miss him always. I am honored to have been the mother to such a brave man. He served 2 tours in Iraq and loved his country and his Commander in Chief, President Bush. I ordered more Memorial Bracelets today because I had the honor of meeting Sen McCain 2 nights ago, and he requested one of my son's bracelets. He plans to keep with it with all the other bracelets he has received.

Anonymous

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October 27, 2008

Now SGT Al-Taie is the last missing soldier of Operation Iraqi Freedom. While deployed to Iraq, I worked in the Joint Personnel Recovery Center/Personnel Recovery Division and for a time was the case officer for SGT Al-Taie's eventual recovery. Until he comes home, hopefully alive but home as Maupin, Jimenez, and Fouty have, I'll wear this bracelet.

Anonymous

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October 21, 2008

We ordered a Memorial Bracelets because we lost a very dear friend Pat Wade. We want his family and everyone to know we honor him and his sacrifice. He left behind a wonderful wife, Keri, and two beautiful young girls, who with our help, will always know what a great man their father was.

Ken

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October 10, 2008

Here is my story of why I ordered the Memorial Bracelet of A.A. Lee (Dickie). Dickie and I were the best of friends in our childhood.  We went to school together, played together, and everything else kids do.  When we reached high school age, we car pooled to school together, double dated, took spring break together, and played in a rock band together. During high school, all we talked about was joining the Marine Corps. When we graduated, I was ready, but Dickie wanted to work a year to finish paying off his car. Long story short, I got drafted. After about a year Dickie then joined the Marines. By the time he finished basic training I was already in Vietnam. Dickie wrote to me saying his first duty assignment was Vietnam. I didn't think there was much of a chance, but what the hell, we might hook up when he got there. We didn't, Dickie was killed his first day in country. The way we were treated upon return from Vietnam was not what I expected. I made a special effort to try to put all thoughts of Vietnam in the farthermost depths of my mind. As bad as it seems, the memory of Dickie accompanied the memory of Vietnam. Now almost 40 years later, I find myself joining The Vietnam Veteran's Motorcycle Club. My ex-wife had worn a POW bracelet for a number of years which I always thought was very respectful. I decided that I would like to see if I could find out if bracelets were still available and if so, I would get one in memory of a POW/MIA from North Carolina. During my search on the Internet, I found your site. Much to my delight I found KIA Memorial Bracelets were available. My order explains the rest. Thank you very much for providing this service and may God bless you and your company.

David

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October 9, 2008

I lost the first one I had, but I got this Memorial Bracelet because last year I did a Sept 11th memorial hike in NH. It's called flags on the 48. There are 48 peaks in NH over 4000 feet and every year since the bombing people have hiked in the memorial and flown old glory in honor of those that passed. I decided to honor a fallen soldier as well this year. I bought the first bracelet and then when I moved misplaced it somewhere 2 weeks before the hike. I was able to obtain one from the soldier's mom. I happened to choose SPC William Evans because he died on my birthday fighting for my freedom. I also decided to notify his family that their sacrifice is not forgotten.

Makayla

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October 8, 2008

I ordered this Memorial Bracelet in honor of my brother Cpl Kyle Wilks who was killed April 15, 2008 in Afghanistan. The bracelets look very clean cut and professional and a good way to honor a true American Hero. I also ordered one for my best friend because Kyle was like her big brother that she never had. She doesn't know about the bracelet yet and I can't wait to show her. Hopefully this way she will not get a tattoo. Thank you so much for a company that can do such a thing.

Kimberly

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October 7, 2008

I will wear my Memorial bracelet in memory of my son-in law, Robert Stacey Goodwin, KIA, in Afghanistan, Sept.20, 2004. I loved him as dearly as my own son. I also wear it in honor of my daughter Jennifer Goodwin who lost her soul mate. We will always remember and love Stacey. My bracelet hasn't arrived yet, but when it does, I will wear it proudly, for Stacey believed in the Freedom he fought so proudly for!

Anonymous

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October 1, 2008

Todd Beamer was a real down to earth hero. He did not carry a cell phone, and I am sure he was in the plane knowing he probably was not going to make it.  He had the courage to overtake the plane and didn't realize the lives he saved on the ground.  A remarkable hero.

Ginny

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September 28, 2008

On Memorial Day 2006, I was in Memphis, Tennessee with my mother. Out on Germantown Road, they had a field with rows and rows of American Flags. Each flag was on a pole with a gold ball on top. Below the flag was a yellow ribbon tied to the pole. Glued on the yellow ribbon was a business card with the name of the soldier KIA with his city, state and date of death. The flags were for sale. My mother and I each purchased a flag. I have flown that flag every day weather permitted since that weekend, with his yellow ribbon still on the pole. Then I saw John McCain's acceptance speech as Republican Presidential Nominee. During his speech, he mentioned the bracelet he wore, and the soldier it represented. I was thrilled to know that the POW /MIA bracelets were still being done for our soldiers. I was also surprised to see that SPC Robert Tucker's name on your list, that no one had chosen his name yet. He is my flag soldier! I immediately ordered the Memorial Bracelet, adding the flag and Army logos to link them. I have a son that serves in the Army, he has had one tour on Iraq and is beginning his second tour in January. I cannot even begin to imagine how Robert's parents dealt with their son’s death, but I do know how proud the must have been of their son, because my husband and I very proud of our son. I pray for our troops and for their families every day. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to honor one of our countries fallen heroes.

Jan

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September 26, 2008

I ordered two Memorial Bracelets in memory of SPC Joshua Lee Plocicawho was KIA June 25 2008. Joshua was my great nephew, and though I didn't get to see him often, his death hurt just the same. I am sending one bracelet to his father David and one to my brother Lee (Josh's grandfather) to wear in his honor. I will be ordering one for myself after I get theirs. The war affects me differently now I think. I shed tears more easily now, and the reason is I truly know how it feels to lose someone you love to war. Now I cry for everyone that loses someone they love. All we can do is pray that the war ends soon. For everyone that has lost someone God Bless You. May they all be Forever in Our Hearts.

Lisa

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September 22, 2008

I received my Memorial Bracelet today and it is - in a strange and sad way -beautiful. Well made. Fits perfectly. But I wish that we had no reason to wear them. I am already proudly wearing it in support of past and present Armed Services members and their families. I pray that someday Capt. Speicher can be brought home even after all these years. I'm curious as to whether, if he or his remains are ever found, will I know? I will think of him and all who go into harm's way in my defense often every day. I have not personally lost a family member to war but my Uncle is a retired Army General, my brother a former Marine, I have a very close friend who was in the Navy. Capt. Speicher could be any of them. But even though I do not know him, he was them to someone else. I think of him, and his family and friends, and all our veterans every time I look at this bracelet. Thank you so much for carrying the tradition forward. I Googled POW bracelets after seeing John McCain speaking about the one he wears. I wanted one during the Vietnam War but was too young to know how to go about getting one. I am proud now to be able to support our troops in this way.

SFC Wesley "Tommy" Neel

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September 16, 2008

I got the Memorial Bracelet the other day and it looks great. I learned about you guys through a friend who also learned from another friend of his. The one I ordered was of CSM James Blankenbecler who was my Chief of Basic Non-Commissioned Officers Course (BNCOC) as well as a former Skystriker, (3-4 ADAR). The last time I saw him was when I left BNCOC a week early to deploy to Afghanistan and he shook my hand and wished me well when I left. I learned that he had died in OIF a little over a year later and he was the first Air Defender to give his life in OEF/OIF. I think it's a great thing ya'll are doing and I'll be sure to pass the word along!

Tim

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September 11, 2008

I just received the two Memorial Bracelets I ordered. They're very nice and appear to be of good quality. I am wearing John Sinnock's bracelet as I type. John was a friend and comrade in arms. John's MOS was armored scout I believe, but he served as a grunt in D troop, 3rd Sqdn., 17th Air Cavalry beside me. On the day that he was mortally wounded we were walking toward a small ville in Tay Ninh province. We believed the Viet Cong had occupied it during the night, so we approached with caution. Still the first volley of fire from the village took us by surprise. An RPG rocket exploded in front of us and John took a chunk of shrapnel through his chest and lung. He was alive when we put him on the dust-off Huey but didn't make it to the field hospital. He was a good friend, a great dry sense of humor, and I wanted the bracelet to remember him by. Obviously, it's been over 40 years and I haven't forgotten him. When my daughter's high school class was studying the Vietnam war, the teacher asked if any of the dads were vets, and if so would they come and speak to the class. I talked about John. Our friendship, the laughs we had. I told them that John and I were only a couple of years older than they when this happened and that there were more than 56,000 other John R. Sinnock stories.

Anonymous

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September 11, 2008

I recently ordered a Memory Bracelet to honor my Father, who was recently killed in action, in Afghanistan. Being a 19-year-old girl who received the news just days before my 20th birthday, really hit me hard, and made me so aware of what is truly going on over there. Our troops are making a huge impact for the way of life over there, and I want to thank every soldier who is giving up their lives with their families, so make life better for others. My father was an amazing person who loved children, and would do anything to make others happy. This bracelet will help to keep his spirit alive, and also hopefully make an impact on others who see myself, and also my grandfather and uncle, who I purchased one for as well.

Jan

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September 9, 2008

I ordered my Memorial Bracelet remembering Ricky Lynn Herndon because he was my first love. They say you never forget your first love and it’s the truth. I met Ricky when we were both 15, in 1957. He was one of the smartest, nicest, decent and loving person I had ever met, and I have yet to meet anyone that comes close to being the man he was. He is the last thing I think of at night, and his picture is the first thing I see in the morning. It has been over forty years now, but my love is as strong if not stronger than ever. I happened onto your website by accident, and was so glad I could do something like this. I think being able to order a bracelet honoring your special person is a wonderful thing. I wear my bracelet with love and pride all the time. I will be forever grateful.

Anonymous

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August 31, 2008

I am a member of Rolling Thunder NC1 and I’m retired Air Force, and originally, I thought of getting a POW-MIA bracelet with an Air Force member’s info from the Vietnam War. However, when I found your site and saw what you had to offer I thought to myself, why not honor someone from the war I was a part of. You see, I entered the service in 1980, and my unit was based in Oman during Desert Shield & Storm. And that is why I chose to have Scott Speicher’s info on my Memorial Bracelet.

Paula

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August 30, 2008

My daughter is in JROTC at Rossview High School in Clarksville, TN. Her step-father is active duty Army serving his 4th deployment (2 for OIF and now 2 for OEF). When she learned that the classmate whose picture is painted on a wall in her school had been killed in action, she said she wanted a bracelet for him. Her goals are to graduate with Distinguished Honors, join the Army and make a difference in the world, just like SPC Joshua L Plocica.

Anonymous

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August 24, 2008

I purchased the customized bracelet for our daughter who has just begun college on a Naval ROTC scholarship. She hopes to become a Naval Aviator and fly fighter jets just as Capt. Michael S. Speicher did. Our daughter was not even two months old when the Gulf War began in 1991. We watched the television accounts on CNN while holding, feeding, and rocking her to sleep. We did not know on that first night of the war, in the midst of dozens of successful sorties by the Navy, that then LCDR Speicher had been lost. We did not know that night that our infant daughter would one day feel called to serve our country in the Navy. My hope is that wearing this bracelet will serve several purposes. When she grows weary of her studies, may it help her to restore her strength. If she gets distracted, that it directs her focus back toward her goal. I hope that it will keep foremost in her mind her wellspring of respect and admiration for those who have served before her and that she honors their sacrifices by pursuing this path with courage and commitment. I hope it provides inspiration to her and her fellow midshipmen and remind them that their mere willingness to serve is one of the most powerful deterrents against our enemies' efforts to destroy our great country. May it be a reminder that we never leave any one of our soldiers, sailors or marines behind and to spare no effort or resource to bring them back home. And, may it remind her to say the occasional prayer to God to send comfort to the family of Capt. Speicher.

Mitchell

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August 20, 2008

The Memorial Bracelet I ordered was in memory of Dion Stephenson who I served with in the Marines. He was KIA in Desert Storm. Dion and I were like brothers. He was only about 50 yards from my position when the vehicle he was in blew up. It's hard enough to lose a family member, but it is harder to lose someone who you have experienced things with that most people will never experience nor understand. My ordering a bracelet is my way of ensuring that my fellow Marine, and brother, will never be forgotten.

Anonymous

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August 12, 2008

I ordered Memorial Bracelets for both my husband and myself. We met when he was activated as an army national guard soldier and I was a civilian contractor. We were both working soldier readiness processing for those going to Iraq. We had been think of getting these bracelets for a while since we met so many men and women who deployed for our country. We chose one soldier in particular, Army Sgt. Timothy Craig Kiser assigned to the Army National Guard's 340th Forward Support Battalion, 40th Infantry Division. My husband had originally been given orders to deploy and for reasons only the man upstairs knows, this soldier went instead. We had spent time with him in the months prior to his deployment. He went to Iraq in January and we found out he was KIA in May, just 5 month later. To this day, I believe everything happens for a reason and I wanted these bracelets to always remember Sgt. Kiser and all of the other men and women who have given their lives for us and our country.

Anonymous

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July 24, 2008

I am a 1LT in the US Army. I was a Fox Recon Platoon Leader at one point. I had a squad leader, SSG Kennon. He left my platoon and PCSed to Fort Campbell. He was assigned to an Infantry unit in the 101st. He was killed during Operation Iraqi Freedom. I wear his name as a remembrance for his ultimate sacrifice. He was one of my best soldiers. We all miss him dearly.

Anonymous

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June 25, 2008

I was introduced to Capt Mike Nawrosky while he was assigned as aide de camp to the commandant of cadets at West Point. This job is traditionally offered to the most outstanding lieutenants. Mike then was promoted to Captain. An event we celebrated while he was at West Point. We dated exclusively until he left for Vietnam. We wrote to each other Mike was wounded and died because of those wounds at Walter Reed Hospital. His last letter came after he was buried at the USMA cemetery. He was awarded Posthumously the Silver Star. Mike's leadership qualities were proven on the battlefield. Even 40 years later, after being married to a wonderful man, having children and grandchildren, I feel so sorry that Mike never got to experience the joys in life. He should never be forgotten. Mike paid the ultimate sacrifice with his life. He had parents and sister and they are deceased now. So, he will live through friends lives that he touched while he was with us. God needed him more. He was always in my heart. Those memories will be sweeter with the bracelet.

Pete

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June 24, 2008

I was searching the Web on Memorial Day and specifically looking for my friend Vinny Daiello who died in SVN on Dec. 20, 1968, almost 40 years ago. It's almost too incredible to believe. In searching I somehow, thank God, stumbled on your site and I will be forever grateful. I was stationed in Dong Ba Thin, SVN from May 1968 to May 1969 with the 10th Combat Aviation Battalion, the Vagabonds of Vietnam. I knew my friend Vinny was there with an infantry unit, but had no clue as to specifically where he was located. Every week I would scan the MIA/KIA lists in Stars and Stripes. One day I see listed in the KIAs Sgt Vincent T. Daiello. Vinny's last name is not that common, so after the initial shock wore off I contacted a guy I knew who worked in Graves Registration" in Saigon. I told him about seeing Vinny's name and asked about being assigned a "body escort" to accompany Vinny's remains stateside. He told me that Stars and Stripes were so far behind listing names that my friend was most likely already home and buried. As it turned out he was 100% right. The family and friend at home had all decided it served no purpose telling me of Vinny's death and didn't intend on telling me until I returned home. I've been to the Vietnam Memorial several times and have etched Vinny's name. I also visited his gravesite with another close friend and Vinny's brother Joe Daiello in 1969. I am so proud to be wearing Sgt. Vincent T. Daiello's bracelet and do not intend on ever taking it off.

Carol

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June 23, 2008

My brother Lcpl Michael P. Minehan was killed in Viet Nam. I have been wearing a bracelet in memory for him since 1991. It was a birthday gift from a wonderful friend. In fact, he bought one for all my family members as well. I wear it every day no matter what I am doing, working, golfing, beaching, my daughter’s wedding, my grandchildren’s baptisms, 1st communions etc.  I am never without.  I have gone through 3 bracelets now.  My mom and dad gave me theirs when my original snapped in half, which I still have. When this last one snapped I was very upset and sad. My boyfriend went on line and ordered this for me and what a GREAT surprise it was. I absolutely love it and so do all my sisters.  I love the pray hands that my boyfriend had placed on it and the fact that it has the place where my brother is listed on the WALL. What an honor to me that I had a brother who gave his life freely and joined the Marines to go to Viet Nam.

Anonymous

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June 13, 2008

Sometime in the late eighties I took a friend to the VA hospital. While I was waiting, a man had a computer printout of the POWs and MIAs. As I looked through the pages, I passed by what I thought was last name Derringer. I backed up to see what would be the first name of someone named after a gun. I turned out to be Dillender, William Edward. Then a chill hit me as I saw his D.O.B 10-06-51. The same as mine. As I sit here, I tried to think what I was doing when I was 19. I thought about him often. In the middle nineties when I got my computer I would go to Memorial Wall site a lot. It took a while with a dial-up modem at 28K. Every year on my birthday I always celebrated it with William. I don't know if he is my older friend or younger friend, perhaps I never will. I just know he is my friend that I never got to meet. I understand his remains were found and that he was sent home to his family. I wanted to get a bracelet before his name was removed the list. I will always wear it.

Anonymous

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June 4, 2008

When Matt Maupin's body was found in Iraq I just felt so touched by the whole story. I had always thought that he would be coming home. I followed that story for four years. When we had word that he had died, I wanted to do something-anything to make a difference. When I was reading the online guestbook for his parents I saw that a lot of people had bracelets for him. So, I searched for a website that sold POW/KIA bracelets, and I found your website. I saw that you also donated a portion of the money from each bracelet. I feel that by ordering this Memorial Bracelet that I have started to do a small part for families that have lost very special people. 

Anonymous

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June 3, 2008

I remember clearly sitting in a pew Sunday morning and hearing the preacher announce the horrifying news, Frank Walkup IV was killed in Iraq. This was Father’s Day 2007. My mind reeled as I tried to process the news. My friend - No, that’s not right - my good friend would not be coming home. A small child would forever know her father as a photograph, and a young bride would only have the memories of her husband’s strong arms around her. Frank was one of the very first people I taught karate to. I remember him trying so very hard in class, wanting to get every move perfect. His grin when he would nail a technique would light up the dojo. When I close my eyes, and think of Frank, I chose to remember this and not the handfuls of Middle Tennessee dirt thudding against the top of a casket and certainly not the protesters that felt his funeral a place to make their opinions on politics known. You see, Frank Walkup was a person who had hopes, dreams, goals, and a life to live. If we, the living, do not honor his sacrifice then he is wasted – and all human life is too precious to be wasted.

Anonymous

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May 20, 2008

My Memorial Bracelet is for Snyder Pattishall Bembry who was killed in Vietnam on November 17, 1965. I never met this man. I read a book when I was 14, I can't even tell you the name of it. It must have been a school assignment or something, but there were a few short sentences written about this man. I am now 27 and his name has never left my mind. I think of him almost daily and the words I had read about him. His memory and short life have eternally burned a hole in my heart and I know that I will never forget him.

Anonymous

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May 19, 2008

I ordered my Memorial Bracelet in honor of SSG Jeffery L Hartley. A soldier from my home town of Hempstead, TX. I have been friends with Jeff's father for many years and knew SSG Hartley as well as I also served for 21 years. SSG Hartley's father is also a long-time police officer of our city. SSG Hartley served in the US Army for 6 years and served 5 combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. He served with the 75th Ranger Battalion and was serving in the 3rd ID when he was KIA on 08 April 2008. Jeffery will be greatly missed by all that knew him. He was a remarkable young man of only 25 years old. He not only answered the call of this great country, but paid the ultimate sacrifice so that we could continue living free. Rest in eternal peace young soldier, you will not be forgotten. Your mission is complete.

Jenny

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May 8, 2008

Hi, my name is Jenny. My husband is currently in the Army and we are stationed in Germany. He wears three different Pow/Mia bracelets to remember other service members that have been listed as missing in action to honor their memory so that their story is remembered and their sacrifice never forgotten. When I was just 18, my cousin Christine. L. Mayes was killed in the Gulf War better known as Operation Desert Storm. I went on the site and found her name listed there. I wanted to wear it so that I could honor her service and memory just like the other unfortunate soldiers who lost their lives so tragically, so that what she gave up wouldn't be forgotten and could be remembered. It's a great cause and I'm glad to do my small part. She was a distant cousin that I only met once. They lived in Rochester, while I lived in Franklin. I started work at a local amusement park where I met her sister Pam and we became good friends never knowing that we were cousins. We met again at Christine's funeral. It was hard watching my friend and cousin bury her sister and at the same time realizing that a life so young could be taken so quickly. Christine was honored with full military burial, and I couldn't help but be touched by the ceremony honoring her for giving the greatest sacrifice anyone can give! I am proud that such a brave soldier represented our country but also to learn that that same soldier represented a part of my huge family is an honor. My husband as well as other family members and many friends are soldiers as well and I am one of many that hope to never have to deal with a loss like hers!

CPL Ray

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May 7, 2008

SGT Unruh was a damn fine NCO, a professional, a mentor, and he was a friend and a brother. He will be missed but not forgotten. His boots will be tough for anyone to fill. I wish you a safe journey to your final OP, SGT Unruh.

J

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May 1, 2008

I wanted to write to you to tell you a little info about the Memorial Bracelet I ordered. My girlfriend, soon to be fiancée, is a nurse and has just secured a job with the Veterans Affairs Hospital in the Pittsburgh, PA area. Being a "civilian", one of her patients was telling her she didn't understand loss and brotherhood. She explained she had lost a friend in the Iraqi Freedom efforts and how "Goody" (Joseph Goodrich), her and I all worked together. We were police officers in a local amusement park over the summer months and she was a medic in the same park. We worked 16 hour shifts usually 7 days a week during the summer. And it wasn’t for the money, it was because we worked closely with great friends we all trusted. Ssgt. Goodrich "Goody" was a wonderful man that was larger than life. We all miss him and are very proud of him. He fearlessly decided to fight for his country and made the ultimate sacrifice because of his honor and beliefs. These are attributes that us "civilians" learn to emulate through his memory. We feel that wearing this bracelet will not only keep the memory of Goody alive, but also show that this conflict has effected all of us in some way, soldier and civilian alike.

Anonymous

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April 23, 2008

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet in the name of PO2 Brian K. Joplin. I never knew Brian. His name was selected semi-randomly. I knew I wanted someone who had been in the Navy and was from Oklahoma. I noticed that the date he died was the same date as my son's birthday (October 4). Imagine my surprise when I checked and saw his first name was Brian, which is also my son's name. It is my great honor to wear this bracelet in his memory. I will tell anyone and everyone about Brian and how he died in Afghanistan and let them know how they, too, can show their support. Thanks for the opportunity.

SFC Zane

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April 19, 2008

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet from you a few months back. The individual that I request and received was Jared C. Monti. I knew SFC Monti when he was just a SGT and I was just a SPC. I attribute my success and current position to his attitude towards the job and the ESPRIT DE CORPS he had for those around him. There aren't words that can do him justice in describing this top notched NCO. Those that knew him will truly miss him and those that were on the receiving end of his profession never seen it coming. I would like to thank you for providing motivation to me during these troubled times and a daily reminder of why we do what we do.

Jack Sweet

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April 9, 2008

This bracelet is for our son. Glenn Sweet who lost his son, Jack on Feb. 8- 2008 to a roadside bomb in Iraq. Jack was named after me, his grandfather, Jack Sweet. He was only 19.  He never had a chance in life. His recruiter said that he never had anyone try harder to get into the service. He had been a member of the young Marines before going into the Army. He did have the chance to go to his graduation at Fort Benning, from there he was sent to Fort Drum, which is only 25 miles from our/his home in upstate New York. Jack was the first person killed in combat from our village since WW2. Fort Drum is naming a new bldg. on post after Jack. It is in the works to name a section on route 12 in his honor.

Christina

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April 5, 2008

I chose PVT BYRON W. FOUTY MI ARMY who is MIA in Operation Iraqi Freedom because he is my age. I am 19 years old and so is he. I support all our fighting men and women and I know the sacrifice that they pay. My grandpa is a Korean War vet and I have family and friends who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. We have been fortunate enough not to lose any loved ones in war. The bracelet will remind me to pray for Pvt Fouty and his family every day and I hope that he is alive and is found and able to return home to his family. The bracelet is an outward expression of my appreciation to Pvt Fouty and all the troops that have served in the U.S military. All the troops, current and veterans, are in my prayers. God Bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Anonymous

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March 31, 2008

The bracelets that I have worn previously were all purchased on the Mall near the Vietnam Wall. This weekend it was announced that SSgt. Matt Maupin's remains were identified and recovered. SSgt. Maupin is the name on the bracelet that I have worn for the past three years. I can now retire the bracelet since he is returning home.

Anonymous

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March 31, 2008

When on your site, I realized that I could acquire a bracelet that will honor a friend of mine from high school, WO2 John Phillips. John was killed while flying a helicopter in RVN in August of 1970. I am honored to be able to wear John's name on my wrist.

Tara

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March 30, 2008

Today I ordered the POW/MIA bracelet of Matt Maupin. I heard on the radio just today that his body has been found and that he is no longer missing. I have been wearing a bracelet with Matt's name on it for over a year now, and it is beginning to get pretty worn out. The reason I purchased another one is to put up to be given to my son one day. You see, my son George was born on April 9, 2004, the exact day Matt went missing. Matt is from a town about an hour from our house. I want my son to always remember Matt and to always remember what Matt and those that serve give for our freedom. Thank you for your site and may God bless you.

Roy

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March 12, 2008

I recently ordered a memorial bracelet from your site. I have seen them around and had to get one for my brother. Well, he is not my brother. He is my brother from another mother. I really miss him a lot. He was killed in Karbala, Iraq. He was kidnapped and murdered with a few other soldiers. He died January 20, 2007. I appreciate what you do for the ones who lost their loved one.

SGT Judge

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March 6, 2008

I received my Memorial Bracelet and thank you. It is not something that I wish to have however I don't know that I will ever take it off. SGT Hill and I served together in Iraq 04-05. I was his gunner. We have been with each other for 12 years in the same National Guard unit. He volunteered for the mission that our state received for Afghanistan and was KIA 2 Jan. 2008. He was one of the best NCO's I have ever had the privilege of knowing, not to mention friend and mentor. I don't know what else can be said about him. I will be ordering more. SGT Hill left behind 3 boys 11, 13, &15. We did convoy security and in that truck traveled over 80,000 miles together. 

SrA Tara

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March 6, 2008

I recently returned from my first tour to Iraq. I'm a medic and I saw a lot of sad and awful things that still haunt me to this day. But nothing bothered me as much as having Cpl. Anthony Bento as my patient. He was the first American patient of mine to pass away. It was a defining moment in my life and I will never forget him. I wear a Memorial Bracelet bearing his name so that people will hopefully ask me about the name inscribed on the sterling silver. I show them his picture when I have computer access and I tell them about how great a man I imagine he was. He is my hero.

Lee

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March 5, 2008

Until recently I have had no interest in the Vietnam War; my main interests are the Canadian and British Armies in the Great War and the 1745 Jacobite Rising. Sometime last year I kept having recurring dreams of being in a jungle clearing and coming under fire. Nothing too strange really as I had been in the British Army (Royal Military Police) and we used to do exercises in wooded areas and I thought that was what I was dreaming about. Then one dream went a little further than the others, only a bit but this time I managed to see more around me; and something made me think that this was like watching a Vietnam War film. This puzzled me a bit as I had never watched a Vietnam War film in my life. Anyway, this led me to start looking at the Vietnam War in a bit more depth, and whilst just browsing and putting in family names and dates of birth I was surprised to find Private Robert J. Todd’s details which showed him MIA on the very day I was born.

Federico

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March 5, 2008

Sorry for my poor English, but Thank You! I have known Airman First Class Elizabeth Jacobson and I have hand wrote a poesy for her in Italian language and a my friend has translated it: " In questa notte buia, il Tuo sorriso risplende come una nuova costellazione, lassu' nel cielo, porta il Tuo nome e brilla con la Luce dell'Amore, pulsando al ritmo di un Cuore che non si e' mai spento... " "In this dark night your smile glows like a new constellation in the sky above, it carries your name and shines with the light of love, beating at the rhythm of a heart that has never died..."

Tina

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February 21, 2008

I have three brothers that are all active duty, two in Force Recon in the U.S. Marines and one is an M.P. in the U.S. Navy. When the middle brother joined up he graduated from high school and boot camp the same day. While he was at SOI he saw a soldier with a red bracelet and asked what it was, after finding out where and how to get one he made a special request for one of his own. He requested one with the name of an enlisted Marine from the state of Utah as that is what he was and that is where we are from. Little did I know that he had ordered the bracelet for me to help me get through a rough time in my life. I was pregnant with my second child and going through a rough divorce, this would have been around the end of 1993. He received the bracelet and saved it to send to me as a Mother’s Day gift from both of my children. I put that Memorial Bracelet on and from that point it left my wrist maybe five times until 1999. On March 27, 1999 I was at my mothers with my family and I happened to notice the newspaper sitting by the fire place, the caption said "Vietnam Soldier's Remains Are Coming Home" and there was a 5X7 picture of a man holding a photo of a soldier by it. I remember grabbing the paper and feeling like I was in a roller coaster, I was crying and yelling for everyone to come look. They were bringing my guardian angel home, you see I have referred to Harold E. Reid as my guardian angel and do so to this day because nothing bad has happened to me since he came in to my life as a gift. Harold left for Vietnam right out of high school and boot camp, he was killed in September 1967 in South Vietnam. He had left his troop to look for something when they were ambushed, left to die in a field with a couple of other young men by the Vietnamese gorillas who attacked the village. He was buried by several of the villagers after the American troops had left due to the fire fight. It was learned that the villagers later moved him to a different spot where he rested until 1993 when after years and years hard work and determination that all our troops come home the military investigators and the elders in the village, with the help of the Vietnamese government, could find the spot where he had been moved to and could recover the remains. I read the article and found that his mother was still living, I called information and got her phone number to let her know how happy for her that I was. We spoke for a while and I explained about my bracelet she told me that she would like to meet me if I could make it to the services. On a freezing April 4, 1999 I joined a couple hundred people in a little cemetery to lay to rest a man who had gone missing before I was even born. He is never far from my mind and always in my heart as are those who have yet to be brought home. I ordered the replacement Memorial Bracelet in honor of him and thank you for the chance to share my story with you.

Anonymous

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February 8, 2008

I selected one of 6 young men that I served with who gave their life for this country. I expected James Parker to make it home. He almost did. I will never forget his happy and smiling face. His family lost a wonderful person. God Bless them all!

Anonymous

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January 29, 2008

I ordered this because it was my twin brother who was killed and I wanted something that I could wear every day to keep him with me.  This has been a terrible tragedy in our family and he will forever be missed and loved. Always Loved and Never Forgotten.

Andrew

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January 21, 2008

My girlfriend chose the name of Joanne Ahladiotis (God Bless her) because like her she is of Greek extraction and they are both the same age. I am planning to take part in the New York Marathon and I will be wearing it during the run, in honor of not only her but of all who died that terrible day and also the families who I am told still mourn to this day.

Elizabeth

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January 14, 2008

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet for my son and myself in Memory of SSG Zachary Tomczak who was killed in Iraq Sep 25, 2007. My son, who is currently serving in Iraq, was on a detail with Tomczak when he died. Tomczak was his team leader and friend and it affected my son greatly. I wanted my son and I to have a way to honor the sacrifice the Tomczak made for all of us. 

2007

Anonymous

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December 18, 2007

I ordered my Memorial Bracelet due to having a slight personal connection to the individual, (A1C Brent Marthaler, USAF), I am honoring and remembering. It was April 16, 1996 and I was sitting in the living room of our suite at Khobar Towers, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, King Abdul Aziz Air Base, 4404th Wing. We had cleaned out our bedrooms and were awaiting our replacements from Eglin Air Force Base in the living room of the suite. We had been there since January 1996, and the second tour from Eglin AFB was coming in to finish out our 6-month commitment at Dhahran. As our fellow airmen were coming into the suite to take their assigned bedrooms I saw A1C Brent Marthaler walk in. I paid more attention to A1C Brent Marthaler, than the others, not because he was carrying his luggage but a pillow with a cartoon pillow case and due to him taking the bedroom I had just vacated. Time has robbed my memory of the specific cartoon on the pillow case but I remember thinking how funny it was that even in a potential hostile environment how we all brought certain things with us to help give us some symbolism of home and attempt to make the time more bearable. Myself and the first half of the tour then left Dhahran later that day and returned to Eglin AFB, FL. On June 25, 1996, a truck filled with explosives was parked across the street from that very building A1C Brent Marthaler was living in and detonated. Because of the explosion, A1C Brent Marthaler along with 18 other USAF members were murdered that day. I have no way of knowing A1C Brent Marthaler's specific location inside that building at the time of the explosion, but can only hope and pray that his death along with the 18 others was quick and painless. He worked on the flight line as a F-15 crew chief I believe. I was an Ammo Troop assigned to the 33rd Munitions Flight but had seen A1C Brent Marthaler on the flight line at different times while stationed at Eglin AFB. So, I have chosen to remember A1C Brent Marthaler with this bracelet, not because we were the best of friends, because I don't think we had ever spoken to one another, but for his ultimate sacrifice he paid for his country on June 25, 1996. It has been over 11 years since God has seen fit to take A1C Brent Marthaler and the other 18 USAF members home to heaven and as the years pass I find myself remembering these events more often. And because of this I suppose I need to know that their deaths have not been in vain which is why I choose and am proud to wear this bracelet. Thank you, Memorial Bracelets, for allowing me to do so.  

SFC Dennis

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December 14, 2007

After we got everyone out of the vehicle, our medics had arrived and began to render first aid to my injured men. I cradled SGT Soloman's head in my lap as I held an oxygen mask over his face while the medics did everything in their power to revive him. He was pronounced dead as soon as he was medevac’d to a field hospital.

Kendra

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December 12, 2007

The story behind the bracelets I ordered is one that breaks my heart. My fiancé served 14 months in Tikrit, Iraq with the 1461st Combat HET Unit out of Jackson, MI. In June of 2007, with two months left to serve, one of the men in his unit was hit by an IED and was killed. Twenty-six-year-old SGT Matthew Soper, born and raised in Jackson, MI.  Matthew was one of eight children. I feel like this bracelet is a tribute to him and a wonderful gift to give to fiancé. My heart goes out to the Soper family & the other families and loved ones who have lost a service member in OIF and those who have been taken from this world in any other war, and or way.

Anonymous

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December 5, 2007

The initial motivation for buying the bracelets was to honor my neighbor, Michael Gann, who was killed in 9/11 (he was in NYC for a meeting; he lived here in Atlanta). All stories from that day are sad but Mike’s was particularly tragic. He had only recently remarried for the second time and their blended family included five children who adored him. He was active with youth ministry at the local Catholic parish. Ironically, he had resisted going to NYC for the meeting; he had a premonition that something might happen. He had asked his boss if he could stay behind and (from what I have heard) he was told that if he didn’t go, his career would be in jeopardy. So, he went. He was on a high floor (in the 100s) in the north tower when the first plane hit. Apparently, he called his wife Robin from his cell phone (she wasn’t available) and he left a voice message assuring her that they were all certain they would be rescued soon. Shortly afterward, he left her another message—a goodbye message—telling her he loved her and the children. His wife heard the messages later. I’m sure they haunt her to this day. They never found Mike’s remains; he was memorialized 6 weeks after 9/11 and at the service, each one of his children brought something to the altar that reminded him or her of their father/stepfather. One brought a guitar, a reminder of Mike’s propensity to play for the kids and the youth group. Another brought a pair of running shoes—reminding them of Mike’s love of sports. It was a gut-wrenching service. One year later, I was teaching high school part-time (in addition to my “regular” business) and I had my students prepare a large canvas and sign it with “thank you” messages for the New York City firefighters. I flew to New York, also carrying a laminated version of the bulletin from Mike’s memorial service. On Sept. 10, I gave the canvas to a firehouse in the Chelsea district in lower Manhattan that had lost many of its firefighters in 9/11. On Sept. 11, I tied Mike’s bulletin to the fence next to St. Paul’s church, across from the WTC site, and stood on the steps of a nearby building as they read off the nearly 3000 names of the dead or missing, Mike’s among them. I was alone during the trip and, to be honest, it was a very emotional experience. At 3 different times during the day on Sept. 11, 2002, I encountered three different women who walked or talked or just stayed with me for periods of time—sort of like 3 angels sent to comfort me. I don’t even know their names. I will never forget them.

Anonymous

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December 5, 2007

The other bracelet I ordered is for Sgt. Matt Maupin, whose case I became familiar with intimately as result of meeting his parents two years ago at the Memorial Day Rolling Thunder event in Washington, DC. I was in high school and college during the Vietnam war and we all wore POW bracelets then. I had hoped we would not have to do it again. Thank you for providing this opportunity for people like me to honor and remember those who are lost or missing. God Bless you and your work!

Anonymous

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December 1, 2007

I am from the State of Michigan. I have attended every vigil held on behalf of Pvt. Byron Fouty, since his capture on May 12, 2007. The vigils are held in his honor, so that we never forget or give up hope. His family misses him terribly and I will wear it proudly, as a remembrance to him in his honor. I am also a Blue Star Mother, with a son also currently serving as a 10th Mountain soldier.

Sgt. Donovan Gosney

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December 1, 2007

I was stationed at 2/22 Infantry Battalion at Ft Drum, NY for over 5 years. A lot of my fellow soldiers from basic training ended up down at 4/31. I never had the honor of meeting Byron but as with every soldier I consider him my brother. I purchased a memorial bracelet with Byron's information on it, and I will be wearing it proudly until the day he comes home. You are not forgotten. I heard the tragic news tonight, that Byron was found. I wish his family strength in their time of need. Although this is tragic news, I'm glad they are finally bringing this soldier home.

Michael

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November 27, 2007

I was a scrawny 17-year-old kid who joined the US Army because I was kicked out of school and wasn't allowed back in. I weighed 119 lbs. I went to Fort Benning GA. in April 1967 to end of May 1967. Our drill instructors were strict and disciplinarians to the extreme, but SSG Bennie Monfort seemed to be a bit different as he was always smiling and acted more friendly to us greenies than the other unit Sergeants. SSG Monfort was a nice guy. He was only 10 years older than me. He went to Nam and was killed a year after I left Fort Benning. His death was disturbing to say the least. He treated us greenies like we were his students rather than recruits or something. He always gave us pointers on our footlocker inspections, how to set up our bivouac areas, like a mentor perhaps.  He always had advice to help us in our new setting. I liked the Sarge, and wish to keep his memory alive in my life.

Anonymous

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November 25, 2007

I grew up on Coralyn Avenue, White Plains, NY, and the Winstons lived 3 houses up the hill on Coralyn Road, Scarsdale, NY. Gilley and I were both born in 1938. When he went missing, I was employed in the District Office of Congressman Ogden Reid, who could assist his wife during those difficult days. Recently I attended a performance of "Touch The Names" here in Tucson, AZ. It inspired me to go to the web site for the wall, and then your Memorial Bracelets site.

Ron

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November 11, 2007

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet earlier this year with the name of Matt Maupin engraved on it. I wear it proudly every day. I ordered the bracelet with Sgt. Maupins name because he is a military man who has been missing since 2004 and he is from the Cincinnati area. I have always wanted to wear this type of bracelet but I couldn't decide whose name should be on the bracelet. In checking the internet, I found several military men missing since Vietnam from Kentucky. In checking your website, I found that I could get one inscribed with Sgt. Maupins name and I felt he was the one I wanted to honor. I want you to know I have received several compliments about the bracelet and will continue wearing it until Sgt. Maupin comes home. Thank you for your help. 

2LT ChrisAnne

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November 8, 2007

I ordered a bracelet that has the name PFC Sam Huff. She was killed just about 4 months after she graduated Basic Training and AIT from Fort Leonard Wood, MO. Sam was one of my Privates, I was her Drill Sergeant. She was in 1st Platoon, and I was in 2nd, but being that I was a female Drill Sergeant, I had a different type of closeness with her and the other female privates. I had the responsibility to not only train all the Soldiers of D. Co. 795th MP BN, I had to mentor the females and teach them about being a "girl" in the Army and try to teach them the right things. Sam was a great Soldier. She had the hardest time with her sit ups. She failed almost all her PT test because of the sit ups. It was the week of graduation, and she didn't know if she was going to be able to graduate or not since she had not passed her PT test. The morning she did pass I was right there with her and we were so excited I told her to get on the phone and call her family to tell them it was safe to buy airline tickets to come see their daughter become a Military Police Officer. She looked at me all crazy and said its 0630 Drill Sergeant and I said and your point is......? She said my parents live in Phoenix, AZ and its real early there, I said I know where you’re from and who cares, I think it’s a phone call they are looking forward to getting and they need to start early trying to buy tickets so they are cheaper!! I was very sad to hear that after her graduation in November, she was killed that April. She will never be forgotten, nor will her sacrifice. She was laid to rest in Arlington, which is where thousands of heroes’ dwell. It’s fitting though, because she IS a hero as well.

SSGT Neal

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October 14, 2007

I located your site after a friend was killed in action in Operation Iraqi Freedom and I wanted a way to always remember him. The bracelet I ordered is in memory of SrA Jason D. Nathan. SrA Nathan was stationed at Royal Air Force, Lakenheath in the UK and was one of a handful of Airman that I had direct contact with every single day. Airman Nathan was very intelligent and dedicated to the United States and the Air Force. His dedication and professionalism was the first things I noticed about him. While deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom I received word that Airman Nathan had been killed in a roadside bombing attack near Tirkit, Iraq. Having known him personally I wanted a constant reminder of his sacrifice and the consequences of serving in today's military. Wearing Airman Nathan's bracelet is my way of honoring him and continuing his dedication to duty that is demanded of all US service members.

PFC Muir

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September 28, 2007

My sister got me a Memorial Bracelet when I found out that a friend of mine passed away. It was hard for me to understand how someone could be gone that I just went through Basic and A.I.T with. Seems like it was just the other day I was playing in the snow with him. It was a big wake up call for me! I'm deployed as I type this e-mail. Now that I have Bohannon's Memorial bracelet around my wrist, he is not forgotten in anyway. He will always be my brother in arms

Danielle

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September 6, 2007

This is a great reminder of my friend and fellow communicator GySgt Shawn Lane. He and I were promoted to GySgt (E7) together and ate lunch often while we were stationed at HQBN Comm Co, 1st MARDIV. I saw him last at lunch the day before I went overseas. His wife and son were his life and we talked about our families’ ad nauseam (to others I am sure). When I learned of his death I was devastated, and even more so because I was stationed in Japan but in Korea on an exercise and could not fly to Camp Pendleton and pay my respects. To this day I miss him. I wish blessings to his family and to all who remember him.

Sherry

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August 14, 2007

My oldest son's uncle, U.S. Marine Sgt. Dennis M. Orbino, was KIA in Vietnam on 25Mar69. I purchased a bracelet for my son for Christmas last year (2007) to ensure that Dennis and his ultimate sacrifice will never be forgotten. Dennis may not have lived to see his nephew born but my faith tells me that he has always been with him. I have no doubt that Dennis will be at his final duty outside heaven's gates when we arrive to greet us all. Semper Fi

Anonymous

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August 14, 2007

I don't think our troops are receiving all the support they should. Not to mention the families of the men and women serving to protect our country! Protecting even those who protest! You see I come from a military background, growing up overseas on military bases, and I personally don't care how people feel about the war, whether you are for it or against it, but I do believe that no matter how you feel, you should support and be extremely proud of the men and women who sacrifice all to protect us and our great land! For without them, we could be living like the people in Iraq and Afghanistan. I am wearing the bracelet for Pvt. Byron W. Fouty, who is currently MIA. He is only 19, the same age as my son. My prayers are with him, his family, and every person who is protecting our precious freedom!

Anonymous

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August 8, 2007

I received my first MIA bracelet for LCPL John B. Nahan III (a Marine that served in Vietnam in early 1994). A new friend and former vet was wearing one at the time and told me all about it and I immediately asked how I could get one. Until recently I knew nothing of John's story. This is what I uncovered about him. He was 22 and served one year and was killed on his first day back.  He was killed on August 3, 1967 but because they could not recover his body he was listed as MIA. Our government recovered his remains in June of 1994 but he was not properly identified until 2001 and his status was then changed to KIA. I will be returning his MIA bracelet to his family via the Department of Defense and I have ordered his KIA bracelet to wear in place of the old one.

Anonymous

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August 6, 2007

I manage a military surplus store in Northern Kentucky just 15 miles from where Matt Maupin's parent's live. I met his parents at the Yellow Ribbon Support Center in Batavia, Ohio and was touched by their spirit and willingness to not forget their son. Since his capture is so close to home and we have ongoing activities around the area to help to lead him home, I felt compelled to purchase the bracelet in support of Matt and his family.

Anonymous

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August 2, 2007

I live in Tucson, AZ now, but I am originally a native New Yorker, born in Newburgh, NY, and raised in Highland Mills, NY (otherwise known as Woodbury). One of the closest towns to Highland Mills is Monroe, NY. I knew several people that perished in the World Trade Center, but I knew Lynne Morris the best. She lived in Monroe. She was my age, and we attended the same high school (Monroe-Woodbury), and the same class (1996). We sat in several classes together, and all my classmates knew each other. She was a very sweet girl, and was nice in high school. I remember going to a store and seeing Lynne's parents hand out fliers to notify the community that she was missing. I just about burst into tears. She was a few months younger than me. I kept thinking that it could have been me that perished like she did. I felt so sorry for her family, and so heartbroken that yet another class member of mine has died (there have been several 7 or so since graduation). I also felt guilty in that I wish there was something I could have done to protect her and everyone else that died that day. I ordered a bracelet and when I think of it I smile because it is like having a piece of her with me.

Anonymous

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July 13, 2007

I received the Memorial Bracelet that I ordered to remember my good friend, Staff Sergeant Joe Goodrich, USMC, who was killed in action on 10 July 2005 in Hit, Iraq. Joe was leading a patrol of Humvees and as they were returning to base, they came under attack by enemy mortar rounds. Joe was mortally wounded, but the Sergeant Major of Joe's battalion wrote in a letter to Joe's wife that he was a good Marine and was radioing for help for his wounded Marines before he died. Joe is survived by his wife Amy, brother George, sister-in-law Rhonda, and his parents. I met "Goody" in 1996 when we were rookie police officers for the Kennywood Park Police Department. We partnered together as often as our shifts allowed and from 1997 through around 2001, we were the principal field training officers for the annual rookie class of officers. Joe had a great sense of humor and was an excellent police officer. Joe also served as a police officer in McKeesport, PA and Indiana, PA. He supported his wife's deli business by making deliveries and working in the shop with her. Joe had a great love for the Marine Corps and continued as a part-time recruiter. He helped prepare young men and women who were on the delayed-entry program to enter the Marine Corps, coaching them on physical fitness, answering their questions, etc. When I heard that Joe had asked to return to active duty in Iraq, I was not surprised. He was a good man and a good friend to all. He is sorely missed by his family, friends, and by Amy.

Anonymous

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July 12, 2007

LCpl Settle was a gunner in one of the vehicles in my convoy when he died.  LCpl Settle was on his second deployment with me when an unfortunate incident occurred which costs him his life.  He is the only Marine I lost in over 300 missions in Iraq. Semper Fi

Cpl Thomas

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July 6, 2007

I wore a similar bracelet for a year until I ran into a Marine who was very intrigued by it and asked where he could get one, so I gave it to my brother Marine as a gift. I then went to the internet to find another bracelet and typed in "memorial bracelet" and your site came up. I wear my bracelet to honor the man whose name is on it. I feel a part of him is with me and he gets to be involved with Marines and other activities I am involved with. His name is mentioned frequently by myself and other former Marines when we talk about my bracelet, so it kind of keeps his spirit with us. Also, interesting to look up the info and background of GySgt Terry Ball Jr. I am sorry I never met the man but I now feel like I know the man a little better. 

SSGT Pheonix

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July 6, 2007

GySgt Ball was an outstanding leader, mentor, and was what being a Marine is all about. There are not enough words to describe him, he was a Marine's Marine; if that makes sense. He had a back bone, and always looked out for the junior Marines. I had the honor to have known him, and felt a part of me break when I heard the sad news from another Marine. GySgt Ball will always be missed and is a constant reminder of the Marine I want to be.

Mark Roberts

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July 6, 2007

Sgt. Ball (as I knew him) was one of the toughest DI's on Parris Island. Afterwards, I had always thought he was one of the best people in my life that shaped me into the man I became. My Drill Instructor, Sgt. Ball, played a huge part. I was one of many Marines trained by this man among men and I know we are all better for it.

M. Berg

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July 2, 2007

The reason I ordered this bracelet is because I was reading comments left on Maj. Kip Taylor's memorial site and one of the writers commented that she had found the site by ordering a bracelet and received Kip's name randomly. I remembered one of my babysitters as a child had a Vietnam P.O.W. bracelet, but I had not previously realized anyone was making them for 9/11 victims or present day KIAs. I knew Kip from playing basketball against his team and later with his team when we were both military brats in Germany. While we were not extremely close, I do remember Kip as one of the kindest most unassuming people I had ever met. I thought wearing the bracelet an appropriate memorial for an outstanding young man who died much too soon. Thank you. 

Anonymous

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June 30, 2007

I ordered the bracelet with a name of a soldier who was killed in Iraq. His name is Travis Bruce. He was killed in Iraq in 2005. He was from my area of Minnesota and he was a Military Police officer. I never knew him, but we were both combat tested MPs (I was in Iraq from April 2003 to April 2004). I felt I owed him the opportunity to keep his memory alive.  What better way to do that than by wearing a bracelet that gets everyone's attention. I have only worn it one day and I have had a handful of people ask me about it. I love my bracelet and I will proudly wear it every chance I get.

Debi Brand

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June 30, 2007

I wear my bracelet because it is just one more way in which I keep, Sgt. Emerson Noah Brand, my only son, my only child, killed in Baghdad, 15 March 2007, now with me always. He is with God now--in part that is, because he is also always with me. Because God promised, "where I am, there you may be also."(John 14:3. NKJV) And where God is, Em is. This bracelet is just one more stroke underscoring that reality. 

Anonymous

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June 29, 2007

I ordered a bracelet because I was in the Army for 8 years, but I never had to go through what anyone of these people went or is going through. I cannot imagine the pain and anguish that these families go through holding out hope that their loved one is still alive. I want to do something so that other people will not forget that there are some out there who have not returned home. I am not only wearing one for SSG Maupin but I am wearing it to remind people here at home that he and many other POW/MIA's are still out there and that we should not forget.

Anonymous

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June 26, 2007

I chose Michael Blaise after reading his wife's book on their life in the army and how her and Michael loved each other and their country. Their story inspired me and I wanted to honor his memory by wearing his name on the bracelet. I truly hope that more Americans will honor the fallen by wearing these bracelets and never forget that their lives will always mean something to us, they will never be forgotten. I will wear it and remember the brave solider CW2 Michael T. Blaise who died protecting us. I will also remember all the brave servicemen and women who risk their lives every day for us. My niece Jennifer is a Sergeant in the Army on her second tour.

Anonymous

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June 26, 2007

I have received my bracelet and love it. I ordered the bracelet for LCDR Michael Speicher who went MIA on 17 Jan 1991 when his plane went down over Iraq. Although I was only 8 years when this happened, I remember watching on the news the events unfold about the war and seeing pictures of LCDR Speicher and his MIA status. It shaped my future from that point on, I knew I would join the military and serve as he did. I always felt it was unfair - those who went missing, captured or killed and the families left behind, and knew it was my destiny in life to serve. Although LCDR Speicher was a Navy pilot, he inspired me to follow my dreams and serve in the Air Force. I ordered the bracelet to always be there as a reminder of why I choose to serve and help me when things get tough.

Anonymous

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June 21, 2007

The story behind mine is, I am a 1LT in the US Army. I was a Fox Recon Platoon Leader at one point. I had a squad leader, SSG Kennon. He left my platoon and PCSed to Fort Campbell. He was assigned to an Infantry unit in the 101st. He was killed during Operation Iraqi Freedom. I wear his name as a remembrance for his ultimate sacrifice. He was one of my best soldiers. We all miss him dearly.

Anonymous

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June 16, 2007

Thank you so much for the bracelet. The bracelet is beautiful, just like I wanted it. I have gotten so many complements on the bracelet. I located your site while I was doing a search for J. Bryan Chism. And I fell in love with the idea. My story on why I order one is easy. Jan 20, 2007, I lost my best friend, my 'fiancée' if it’s the best way to say it. He died in Iraq and it hurts because I loved him so much.

Anonymous

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June 13, 2007

My fiancée was in boot camp in 1991 in Texas and bought a bracelet on base with CPL Harley John Jenk's name on it. He wore the bracelet every day until it broke last year. He never took it off. I emailed your company in December last year and you added his name to the list of KIA in Vietnam. I was so excited that I could replace the bracelet for him. He wears it every day and doesn't take it off. Thank you so much the bracelet means a lot to him.

Anonymous

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June 8, 2007

This bracelet was to help remind me of why I wear a uniform. There are two names on the bracelet of two men that were in a unit I was once a part of; MSgt. William McDaniel and SSgt. Jaun Ridout. They were both Air Force PJs that were killed in the Philippines during Operation Enduring Freedom. The gave their lives to uphold their motto "That Others May Live." It’s hard to be the one that made it home when others didn't. Seeing their names on my arm will help remind me to serve my country in a manner that they will not be ashamed.

Anonymous

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June 8, 2007

This bracelet was to help remind me of why I wear a uniform. There are two names on the bracelet of two men that were in a unit I was once a part of; MSgt. William McDaniel and SSgt. Jaun Ridout. They were both Air Force PJs that were killed in the Philippines during Operation Enduring Freedom. The gave their lives to uphold their motto "That Others May Live." It’s hard to be the one that made it home when others didn't. Seeing their names on my arm will help remind me to serve my country in a manner that they will not be ashamed.

Anonymous

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June 1, 2007

My brother-in-law Lt. Ray Murphy of Engine 39 Ladder 16 was killed on 911 Ray was killed when the second tower fell, leaving behind his wife and two sons, Ray loved his job and it was no surprise to us that he ran back into the tower to do what he could to help, Ray's body was discovered on Oct 1st.

Anonymous

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May 20, 2007

We have been looking for memorial things since my nephew, Doc Zachary Alday of the U.S. Navy was killed in action on June 9, 2006, by an IED along with two of his Marine buddies and the third Marine was severely burned in Iraq. He was a member of the First Battalion, 7th Marines, 7th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) out of Camp Pendleton, Calif. He was a Navy hospital corpsman, assigned to the Marines. His four best buddies have been to visit since they all came back from Iraq and we have visited them. They and become our extended family and we have learned to love them like Zack did. Now it is time for the boys and the rest of Zack's unit to return to Iraq at the end of August and we wanted something to show them we would be thinking of them every day and praying for their safe return and we think the bracelets are the way to show our love and support. I call these young men boys but they are men even if they are only, 20, 21 and 22 years of age. They have seen so much already that it just breaks my heart for them. We worry about them but it's funny, because they call us all the time checking on us because they worry about us since we lost our loved one (they were there, he died in their arms!).  I just hope and pray they all come home safely this time.

Anonymous

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May 15, 2007

I chose a member of the Marine Corps due to my father's service in that branch and my deep respect for their training, commitment to the Country, and of course their esprit de corps. Major Michael D. Stover, USMC Operation Iraqi Freedom, Killed in Action June 3, 2006 was my selection because he was from my home State of Ohio. By purchasing a memorial bracelet, I saw an opportunity to show my dedication and enduring thanks for the freedoms I enjoy because of the sacrifices of men and women like Major Stover. In wearing the bracelet not only does his name and memory have an opportunity to endure and live on it is also my way of saying to his family, friends, the Marine Corps, and my Country that I too am "Semper Fidelis." May God Bless and watch over all of our troops, guide our leaders to make wise decisions, and to embrace each and every one of our military personnel and their families that are serving and especially to those who make the ultimate sacrifice.

Anonymous

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May 3, 2007

I ordered the bracelet because I lived right across the hall from Regina Clark in the barracks at camp Fallujah. She was a very special person to the Seabees, always cheery and uplifting. I went to her memorial over there and it was very nice. Also, she will be remembered in the history books as the first Navy female to be a combat related casualty in operation Iraqi Freedom. The bracelet is my way of paying respects and sharing the story of her life with the world.

Anonymous

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April 22, 2007

Major Douglas E. Sloan was the son of a friend of mine that I worked with while he was employed as the VA rep for Charlevoix County in northern MI where I am employed as the Senior Bldg. Inspector. His son was a Ranger trained 82nd Airborne veteran who was a company commander in the 10th Mtn. Division in Afghanistan. Major Sloan was showing his relief officer around when he was killed by an IED on 10/31/06 just hours before he was scheduled to go home. He was buried with full honors at Arlington on 11/14/06 in a ceremony attended by hundreds (including myself). Major Sloan was loved not only by his men but also by his fellow officers. He was described by those that knew him as "A Soldiers’ Soldier" and will be sorely missed by all.

Anonymous

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April 20, 2007

I lost one of my dearest friends, Cpl. Mark D. Kidd, in January of this year. I remember hearing about bracelets such as these from people that lived through the Vietnam era. I ordered my bracelet to act as a reminder to everyone that sees me wearing it that freedom is not free, and it is paid for with the lives of our men and women in arms. My friend Mark paid the ultimate cost for freedom, and even though I know I will never forget him, I don't want others to as well. 

Anonymous

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April 20, 2007

My mother got the original bracelet in 65 or 66 because Sgt Demmon went MIA on my brother's birthday. She never took it off until she passed away in 1986.  She did ask that I continue to wear it until he came home, and I promised I would. It was Stainless Steel, the black paint for the lettering have long wore off. I wore it up until last year, when I bent it badly after grabbing for something and the bracelet caught.  Given the age of my bracelet, I didn't want to bend it back, so I put it away and have been searching for some way to replace it. I felt incomplete without it having worn it for so long.

Anonymous

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April 15, 2007

I ordered my KIA bracelet for my friend Jens Schelbert. He will truly be missed. Jens didn't have to be in Iraq. He was born a German citizen, and came to the United States with his mom as a child. He enlisted in the Army and loved it very much, so much that he stayed in and got his citizenship. He was so proud of it. Every young tanker that he ever worked with and every NCO around him and above him respected him greatly. I do not know many men who are half as good as he was and always will be. He truly had a kind and generous heart and totally gave of himself to everyone around him. Few are left whom are as great as he. I shall always miss you my dear friend. I have worn my bracelet every day for you and always think of you because of it to remind me that you sacrificed what many Americans wont for their own country, themselves.

Shawn

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April 13, 2007

I found your site while I was still Iraq. I was going to buy a bracelet for Todd when I was still over there, but I never did. You see, Cpl Todd Godwin was a Marine with the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines Scout Sniper Platoon. I was the Navy Hospital Corpsman that was assigned to them. We were all en route back to Camp Fallujah on the 20th of July 2004 when our convoy was rocked by a massive IED. Todd was killed instantly, but as a young Navy Corpsman, you do your best and try to keep them alive. During the rest of my deployment, we lost a total of 21 Marines and had countless wounded. I remember every one of these young Marines, but Todd is the one that I took the hardest. I'm out now and have tried to put the stuff behind me. Since I figured that I never will, I have finally accepted these losses, and purchased a bracelet with Todd's name. So, I guess that's why it took me so long to get a bracelet.

Jean (Cecil)

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April 6, 2007

I went to high school with Bennie Dexter in Bend, OR. He was a couple of years ahead of me and I always thought he was a great guy, shy but friendly. When he was MIA I had a special spot in my heart for him throughout the years. I never took the opportunity to wear a bracelet at that time as I was attending college and raising a family. As the years have passed, I have never forgotten Bennie and feel that it is a privilege to wear one of these bracelets in honor of his service, commitment, sacrifice and memory. 

Anonymous

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March 26, 2007

I received the bracelet almost immediately after it shipped. I haven't taken it off my wrist since. I ordered the bracelet with the name Cpl. Barton R. Humlhanz, he was a very good friend of mine and I was sitting right next to him when we got hit and he died. My combat boots still bear the laces that contain his blood and I wanted a more obvious way to honor his service and sacrifice.

Sarah

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March 22, 2007

I wanted a bracelet that would have meaning for me. Through a Marine Corps online board for wives, fiancées, and girlfriends, I met a young woman my age who also had a boyfriend in the Marines. However, he was called to a different home on 6 October 2005. Lcpl. Jason Frye is the name engraved on my bracelet. Lcpl. Frye was a strong Marine who bravely served our country. He gave his all, and he deserves to be recognized every day for his efforts. The war has been fought for four years now, and I don't want anyone to forget about our men and women serving overseas. I want a daily reminder of the freedoms our military is protecting. I want people to ask me what my bracelet stands for, so I can proudly describe Lcpl. Frye and the sacrifices he's made for you and me. I am honored to wear such a bracelet.

Anonymous

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March 18, 2007

I ordered this to replace one that was lost while I was bodyboarding. I was deployed to OEF 5 with HHC 2/5 INF along with Sgt Hobbs. We had been there almost six months when he was killed, it was a shock because we thought we were on a pretty lucky streak. But I guess it ran out, and the next six weren't so nice to us. Maybe it was because he was the first soldier in a unit I was in killed, or because I worked with him several times. I won't let him be forgotten. Not that any other soldier is less important in any way. I just hope no one else forgets.

Bobby

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March 15, 2007

The reason I purchased these bracelets is because my best friend Tommy Vandling was killed by an IED on New Year’s Day. This was the hardest thing I have ever had to go through and am still going through. I wanted a way to honor him and have him with me always. These bracelets were the perfect solution. I love Tommy so much and it is just hard to believe that he is gone. So, these bracelets are a daily reminder that he is with all of us every day. He laughs when we laugh, holds us when we cry, and loves us always.

Anonymous

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March 12, 2007

2LT Torres and I went to college together. He graduated one semester before I did and stayed on a while as a Gold Bar Recruiter. He eventually left for school, as did I. I never saw him again after he left. It was not until I was deployed that I had happened to get my hands on a copy of The Army Times that I saw his name in the front section where they list all KIAs. I cut that piece of paper out and carry it in my wallet still today. Richard was a great friend, man and Soldier. He will be missed by many. Thanks for everything that you do to support us, and remember those that have fallen.

Mack

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March 8, 2007

I have had three POW bracelets before and all three men have been returned home. So now I have ordered another bracelet. SSG John T. Gallagher from Hamden, CT lost in Laos on Jan 05, 1968. He is unaccounted for. I may be wearing this one for a long time. You see, when you put on the bracelet you are supposed to take a vow to wear it till he or she comes home. They don't need to be abandoned again! I have been lucky with the men on my bracelets. I can only hope that, like the other three, he too comes home.

Leona

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March 7, 2007

I was on the net looking for anything that I could about Tim Bodden. I had been looking for any information about who he was and what he had done in Vietnam. I had found a lot of information about him. When I was 2 days old I was adopted. That was 1965. Recently I located my birth mother and she told me who my father was. She told me that his name was Tim Bodden and that he was a Marine that left for Vietnam on a 2nd tour. I do not believe that he ever knew about me. When I found out his name, I looked on the Internet to see if by any miracle there was anything about him. I was not prepared for what I found. There is so much about him and his unit, about how he died in Vietnam and about the search that his family did trying to determine if he was still alive or not. He was listed as deceased in 2000. When I found Tim's war memorial page, there is a picture of him. I have 3 sons. My middle son is almost identical to him. In addition to this, my son is also a Marine. There is no doubt that he is the father that I never knew. But I have learned a lot more about him. Have a nice day and Thank you for what you do!

Anonymous

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February 27, 2007

Capt. Rob Secher and I were both assigned to Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 11th Marines during 2000-2002 when we were Lieutenants. Recently Capt. Secher was serving as an advisor to an Iraqi Army battalion in Hit, Iraq. He was on a dismounted patrol when his team came under fire and was subsequently killed on 8 Oct 2006.

Sharon

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February 23, 2007

I found your website when I did a search on SFC Rudy A. Salcido. Rudy was my son SPC Clifford C. Skinner's best friend and sergeant. They were both in Iraq when on November 9, 2006 when the truck in which Skinner was driving, and Salcido was riding in, was struck by an IED. SFC Salcido was killed and SPC Skinner was wounded. I will wear Rudy's bracelet proudly, as he is truly an American Hero.

Anonymous

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February 15, 2007

After reading a letter I wrote in my youth to my dad about Sgt Demmon yesterday, I thought I’d look up Sgt Demmon on the Internet. I found a lot of information, including that his status was upgraded from MIA to POW. In April 1991, the US government released a list of Prisoners of War and Missing in Action who were known to be alive in enemy hands and for whom there is no evidence that he or she died in captivity. This list commonly referred to today as the USG's "Last Known Alive" list, included David Demmon. I thought I see if there were still POW bracelets available and located a site where they can be purchased. Unfortunately, we have added conflicts and names to the list. I will start wearing a POW Bracelet for David Demmon.

Anonymous

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February 15, 2007

I served with Marco Miller in Iraq. He was killed by indirect enemy fire while conducting a mission. He was stationed at camp Taji. I'll be home soon, and I thought what better way to remember him than to wear his name every day for everyone to see his great sacrifice for our country.

Krischon

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February 2, 2007

Hi! I want to thank you so much for the wonderful gift! I bought it for my husband for Xmas. He is always thinking of great things for me, where I am at a loss as to what to get him. He served on the USS Alabama in Bangor, WA with Brian Moss. Brian then took duty at the Pentagon. It was hard to know that he was one of the victims of 9-11. I thought there could be no better gift than one to honor a fallen member of the armed forces. 

2006

1LT Mary Lynn

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December 29, 2006

I was 15 when I met 1LT Allen. But I knew him as Mr. Allen, my earth science teacher in high school. He joined the military after I graduated from high school and I had already moved to college. I had moved away the year after I had Mr. Allen, so I didn't know. It was only after I graduated from the Air Force Academy on 01 June 2005 that I found out from my friend, still living in New York, that our beloved teacher had been fragged in Iraq. I am now a 1LT myself and in Iraq-just like Mr. Allen. I wear my teacher's name on my wrist every single day-and I pray for his family and his beautiful children especially now that his murderer is on trial. I want to Thank you for producing these bracelets. Although they remind us that we are no longer with someone we love, every time I look at the bracelet I remember Mr. Allen sitting on the desk as he teaches a bunch of kids in high school.

Eileen

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December 20, 2006

I bought the POW bracelet as a replacement. I've had the same name with me for close to fifteen years now and when I was in Washington DC this past fall, I made a point to go see Sgt. Matejov's name on the Vietnam Memorial. These guys answered a call and should never be forgotten.

James R.A.

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December 14, 2006

I received the Memorial Bracelet yesterday.  I'm very happy with it. It's good quality, better than I expected.  I ordered the bracelet because I was in Iraq with the Marine who was killed.  I was injured the same day six of my platoon were KIA.  I ordered Rock's bracelet because he was the person who taught me to shoot expert and got me to stick with STA platoon when I figured I was not good enough.

Mona S.

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December 2, 2006

I wear this bracelet for SSG Robert S. Griffith with great pride and it also brings with it some sadness. I know his family misses him terribly and I sympathize with them a great deal. If there is ever a time that someone from his family would like to have this bracelet, I will be more than happy to send it to them. 

Jennifer

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December 1, 2006

My story is not mine, but a friends’. I am in the Navy and was stationed with a friend who lost his brother in Iraq, HM3 Chris Thompson. He was Hospital Corpsman serving with the Marines and was killed in action on 21 October 2005. I bought it to remind me of his sacrifice, as well as all who have given their lives for our country. My thoughts and prayers are always with his family. 

MAJ Kevin

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December 1, 2006

I just received my bracelet and it is well done! I was given your site by my Staff Judge Advocate who also lost a friend. SSG Lance Chase was a friend by way of my wife. It was by way of our children. Lance’s oldest son Brandon and my oldest son have been classmates for over 3 years. As the boys would tell you they are like brothers, only closer. When I was deployed to Iraq for OIF II, Lance had just returned from OIF I. Right away he stepped in and filled a gap for my son while I was gone. He coached the boys’ soccer team, took them out to eat, worked on projects from Home Depot with them, and generally help ease the pain of my son not having Dad around. Today I feel a little bad, because I never knew Lance before I came and found out all the fantastic things he did for my boys while I was away. He was a great Dad who wasn’t afraid to share himself with the boys. He grew to be a great friend as we got to know each other. When he was killed, it affected my son hard because he was the first Soldier he knew who was killed. So, I ordered this bracelet as a memorial to Lance’s memory. It reminds me of a good friend, a fantastic Dad, and a great Soldier. He embodied everything an American Soldier can be, if puts his heart into it.

Anonymous

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November 30, 2006

The bracelet I purchased was to remember a Shipmate of mine. LCDR Williams, then Lt. Williams, was the OPSO of the ship when I came on board as Chaplain. I did not get the chance to know Lt. Williams well, but the time we were on the ship together I realized he was a fine young man with great potential as a Naval Officer. I had the privilege of Baptizing his new born daughter, my first Baptism on the ship. I got the Bracelet to remind me of this fallen Shipmate and the great price that is paid for freedom. I also keep the Baptism picture in my office so when people ask - I can tell them about this Naval Officer I had the privilege to meet.

Cliff

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November 2, 2006

When I was in college in the late 80s, one of my acquaintances was an Air Force ROTC candidate who wore an MIA bracelet for an airman in Vietnam. I thought it was an extremely noble cause, and for years, I researched specific Vietnam POW/MIA soldiers, sailors and airmen. None of their stories resonated. I wanted to have a personal affinity for the serviceman on my wrist. I would drop the search for several months and then renew it with the same results. I simply wasn’t connecting with anyone. But I recently read the story of Keith Maupin, and his bravery, along with his parents’ anguish, hit home. 

Anonymous

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October 22, 2006

I served with several very honorable young men overseas. Some of my buddies who had served overseas in Iraq in 2003 had gotten bracelets from you to honor their fallen brothers. The young man whose name that I put on my bracelet was a very brave and honorable young man who gave his life fighting and defending this great country of ours. I had the great pleasure of serving with PFC Kubik overseas in Iraq and I thought there was no better way to honor him than getting a bracelet from you with his name on it. Thank you very much for giving the chance and the honor to have this one last memory of my fallen comrade.

Cindy

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October 18, 2006

When I was a very young girl, several female photographers had a major influence on me to do as they did and to become the artists they were. One of them was Berry Berenson Perkins who was on the first plane that hit the WTC that nightmarish day. It was so shocking to me her life should end in such violence. She will always be in my thoughts and her family in my prayers. Thank you so for making these bracelets available. It is a day that should NEVER be forgotten.

Richard

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September 28, 2006

On Aug 4, 2006, my daughter's high school classmate and a close family friend was kill in Iraq. Sgt. Brad Beste was serving his second tour in Iraq and received a Purple Heart during his first tour. Just 8 months’ prior, this young 22yr. old soldier had Christmas dinner with my family. He was in the process of deciding if he would return to Iraq for a second tour. In the end, Brad's commitment to his country and the loyalty he felt to his soldiers won him over and he returned to Iraq. I will proudly wear this bracelet to honor Sgt. Brad Beste. Brad's smile, sense of humor, and true friendship will be missed, but nothing will overshadow the ultimate sacrifice that he and many other soldiers have made so that all Americans can continue to enjoy the freedom that symbolizes the United States of America. Thank you, and God Bless you, Sgt. Bradley H. Beste.

Randi

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September 27, 2006

My husband is a fire chief and has been in the fire service for over 35 years. We both have very strong emotions when it comes to the attacks on 9-11. We recently attended the International Fire Chiefs Association annual conference, and they had a very impressive memorial service honoring those lost on 9/11/01. The memorial service had representatives from each of the locations attacked, the Pentagon, Flight 93/Shanksville, and the World Trade Center. FDNY was represented by members of Chief Ganci’s family, his wife, two sons, and their spouses. Chief Ganci’s son, Chris, spoke and it was an honor to listen to the obvious pride and love he has for his father, and the New York Fire Department. He changed career paths after 9-11, joining his brother in the fire service. Our bracelets bear Chief Ganci’s name, so although I ordered them too late to have them for the conference, it has given an additional importance to the bracelets having heard his son in person. We also have children involved in public safety, two firefighters, one police officer, and one 911 dispatcher, so again felt a special attachment to a family involved in public service and safety. 

Denice

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September 25, 2006

I wear: SSG James A. Champion, USA Ranger, April 24,1971 from the Vietnam war. My father served in Vietnam and that is how I became interested in the subject.

My 11 year old daughter saw the bracelets and wanted one so that she will never forget what happened on that day (9-11). I always tell her that history will repeat itself if we do not educate others. She and I think that every person on that flight were heroes and should be remembered. We will wear the bracelets with honor and will never take them off.

Carla

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September 21, 2006

I bought the bracelet to remind people that the terrorists haven't gone away. We need to remember and be ever vigilant or our freedoms and our country will suffer yet another attack. These extremists want us gone from the face of the earth. The people who died at all three sites on that day in September deserve their individual memorials. Each of them made a sacrifice and their deaths should be a wakeup call for all of us. I will wear Michael Horrocks bracelet with pride and remembrance. May his death not be in vain. He is an American Hero. God Bless

Paul

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September 21, 2006

I ordered a bracelet because one of my teachers in high school had one that he wore for the Vietnam War. His was also for a P.O.W. and I remember asking him about it. One day when I saw he was no longer wearing it. He explained to me that the young man's body had be found and returned to his family in the states. That touched me deeply how he had worn that bracelet for over 20 years till that boy was returned to his family. Now with the war in the middle east going on. I figured it was time for my generation to take a stand and make sure these new soldiers are not forgotten. That is why I plan on wearing my bracelet for SGT Keith M. Maupin until I hear about his return home.

Paul S.

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September 20, 2006

The reason I ordered a bracelet is because one of my teachers in high school had one that he wore for the Vietnam war. His was also for a P.O.W. and I remember asking him about it one day when I saw he was no longer was wearing it. He explained to me that the young man's body had been found and returned to his family in the states.

That really touched me deeply how he had worn that bracelet for over 20 years till that boy was returned back to his family. Now with the war in the middle east going on. I figured it was time for my generation to take a stand and make sure these new soldiers are not forgotten. That is why I plan on wearing my bracelet for SGT Keith M. Maupin until I hear about his return home.

Paul S.

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September 20, 2006

The reason I ordered a bracelet was because one of my teachers in high school had one that he wore for the vietnam war. His was also for a P.O.W. and I remember asking him about it one day when i saw he no longer was wearing it. He explained to me that the young man's body had be found and returned to his family in the states. That really touched me deeply how he had worn that bracelet for over 20 years till that boy was returned back to his family. Now with the war in the middle east going on. I figured it was time for my generation to take a stand and make sure these new soldiers are not forgotten. That is why I plan on wearing my bracelet for SGT Keith M. Maupin until I hear about his return home.

Tracy

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September 1, 2006

I am a diver and frequently dive in Monterey. Suzanne Calley was also a diver. She was killed on flight 77 that hit the pentagon. A bench has been dedicated at a very popular dive site in her honor. Her bubbly personality and enthusiasm was contagious. Suzanne was a terrific person and with the upcoming anniversary of our losing her, I feel compelled to comment. My thoughts and prayers are with all the families and friends, who lost someone on that very tragic day. I am praying extra special due to the anniversary. I am a volunteer Chaplain with the Campbell Police Department here in the Bay Area of California. Being in law enforcement only reminds me of the great loss of life and how a handful of people changed America forever. May we never forget that fateful day and God Bless America.

Jeanie

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August 31, 2006

This past Friday September 3rd, 2004 Brian and 17 other men from the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, Weapons Co. were on their very 1st mission or patrol. There were 5 Humvees and 18 Marines that pulled over to check a bridge to see if it was safe enough to take heavy equipment over. It only took about 10 minutes for 2 engineers, along with the other 16 men, to check the bridge out and then they returned to their vehicles. Many of them were already in their Humvees when someone detonated an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) that had been planted in the road close to the Humvees. Our son was only 50 feet away and watched his best friend die. His name was Nicholas Wilt from Tampa, Florida. He was 23 and married for only a little over a year. He and his wife attended the same nursery school. You will not hear anything about this on the news, since there are no news reporters where they are and as I said before, they are fighting in "The forgotten part of Iraq".

Paul A.

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August 29, 2006

I will wear my bracelet proudly in remembrance of my brother, CW2 Scott Jamar. Not only will it help me to think of him often but I hope that it will prompt others to ask why I wear it and who I wear it for, giving me the opportunity to tell them about him and what a great man, father, and brother he was.

Jennifer M.

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August 24, 2006

I got one of the bracelets a year ago. I still have it on, its for Sgt. Keith M. Maupin. I have found out about Memorial bracelets when someone who is part of my family became POW, Capt. Harlan P. Chapmen. When he came home my mom gave him his bracelet that my aunt had gotten it out of luck. Due to that story that I have heard for all 18 years of my life, it made me want to get a bracelet and let someone know I care even though they don't know me and I don't know them.

The Murphy's

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August 16, 2006

Your name and date of death was carried in my fathers wallet from 1967 to 2021 when he finally passed away. A friendship even death couldn't destroy. We continue to honor you, my 17 year old son now carries your memory in the form of a bracelet ordered here and a knowledge of how you died on that hill with 33 others that day with Company I, 5th Marines.

John H.

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August 16, 2006

I ordered my bracelets in memory of my brother Gary Herold who died on September 11, 2001 while working for Aon Insurance in the south tower 98th floor of the WTC. Gary was a supervisor who organized the evacuation of his area and along with Eric Eisenberg , another supervisor who lost their lives helping others. I miss Gary everyday and now I can wear a reminder of him and his sacrifice while helping others. I'm proud to wear my bracelet and will gladly explain why I wear it and what it means to me.

Capt Denise

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August 3, 2006

I am a Flight Nurse in the Air Force Reserves and have served for 22 years. I have recently been deployed to the Middle East Serving in Africa, Qatar and Iraq. I transported many sick and injured and have grown a real sense of pride for what we are doing over there. I chose this bracelet because he is a POW of Iraqi Freedom and I have served there, and I was just returning from my first deployment last year when Keith was captured. He was presumed KIA at one time.

Jeffery W.

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July 28, 2006

I wear my bracelet every day to honor a fallen Security Forces member. I ordered the bracelet to remind me everyday the great sacrifice of the young airman that gave her life in the line of duty. I too am an Air Force Security Forces member as was A1C Elizabeth Jacobson. I wear it out of respect and appreciation to her and my fellow military members.

Susan S.

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July 24, 2006

I just received my Memorial Bracelet and it is great. It fits well and I am so honored to wear it. I ordered a bracelet for SGT Michael J Kelley from Massachusetts who was killed in Afghanistan June 8, 2005. He was under my husband's command while stationed at Otis Air force base in Otis, MA. I met him when I would drive onto base. Always a pleasant and professional man who loved his country. SGT Kelley is greatly missed by my family although we only knew him a short time. 

Anonymous

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July 17, 2006

I was a career volunteer/paid-on-call firefighter and EMT in PA and MA last serving in Northampton County, PA during 2002. I trained at Randalls Island (FDNY) through their weekend courses and knew some of those FDNY killed at the WTC. I also Worked in Mid-Town Manhattan until 2002 and knew some of the civilians that were killed. Lastly, Ralph Kershaw, killed on Flight 175 from Boston, was a colleague of mine from the days when I lived and worked in the North Shore area of Boston. 9/11 is very personal for me and a watershed event in my life.

Anonymous

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July 11, 2006

I met the soldier, Capt Eric Allton, back when we were teenagers. We quickly became close friends and then high-school sweethearts. During this time, his parents became like my second set of parents. Unfortunately, as sometimes happens, we ended up going our separate ways after high school, and ended up marrying people we met at our respective colleges. However, we stayed in contact throughout the years (over 15 years), and I've stayed in close contact with his parents as well. Communication over email made it seem like he was just next door -- regardless of whether he was state-side (in the same state where I live), or across the US, or even across the world. Therefore, his death in Iraq has devastated not only his own immediate family, but had drastic effects on my family as well. I've ordered these bracelets for Eric's parents, as a way for them to have him "close", even though he is in Heaven now, watching over all of us.

Jeremy P.

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July 10, 2006

CPT Charlie Robinson is who is on my bracelet. We went to college together, and we were in ROTC together. I wear the bracelet in honor of him and others who have died to preserve our freedom.

Garrett

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July 5, 2006

The man's name, 1LT Luke Wullenwaber, on the bracelet was our company executive officer and my first line supervisor. He and I worked, and interacted several times a day together. He was full of energy and always brought a smile to everyone's faces with is jokes, and personality. He was killed on Nov 16 2004 by a car bomb in Kaladia Iraq. His memory and work ethics are still in our everyday lives. I ordered the bracelet to keep his memory alive in me and to share his attributes with the rest of the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines there my actions and a desire to full fill his expectations.

Carol

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July 5, 2006

I grew up with Greg Stajk in Kings Park. We graduated together. A lot of people were trapped in the Twin Towers on 9/11, but many others I know were lucky to get out and they described their experiences in detail. Number one was the bravery of the FDNY. Greg lost his life saving others. I know hundreds of other brave souls died helping others, but I wanted to pay tribute to the one I knew while remembering them all. I keep in touch with his brother. Greg's family is grateful for all the support the world has shown.

Cynthia B.

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June 28, 2006

My uncle, Major Dale A. Johnson, was shot down in North Vietnam during the Vietnam war in 1996. He is listed in POW/MIA. This is just my way of honoring my Uncle for his sacrifice for keeping this country free.

Liz F.

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June 28, 2006

1SG Tobias Meister was our student 1SG at 38B reclass school at Ft. Dix. He was 28 years old, an E7, had been head of the drill sergeant academy and earned the Army Drill Sergeant of the Year award a few years back. A phenomenal leader to say the least. A group of us had the privilege to go to Philly for a day off, Toby included. aside for a really great NCO, he was a really great guy too, who took a lot of pride in his wife and on-the-way son. When we, the group, found out that he had been KIA, it hit hard. Wearing the bracelet reminds me that we're in the army to serve and lead, no questions asked. He did his job with no questions asked and lead with the same expectations.

Carrie K.

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June 27, 2006

One of the bracelets I ordered has Kerry Scott's name on it, who I will always be in debt to, he took my husbands place that day, willingly in the understanding my husband would go for him next time. It gives me the chills to think I could have lost my soulmate, and partner for life.

Carrie K.

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June 27, 2006

My husband was on the mission that took Brandon's life. He will never forget Brandon and wore his name when he returned back to Iraq this past October.He came home for a short time and during that time, we were in Nashville for the meet and greet. We were at a bar and my husband requested a song from the artist playing on the stage that night. The artist focused his attention on my husband when dedicating that song, and my husband said no, and threw him his bracelet with Brandon's name on it. The country artist was confused at first, but read it out loud and dedicated the song he performed to Brandon who died 2 days after his unit returned back...almost like he was holding on for the guys to make it home.

Anonymous

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June 23, 2006

I ordered the bracelet to honor my son, LCpl. Eric A. Palmisano, who was killed in Iraq on April 2, 2006. I plan to wear this bracelet proudly in his memory always. He had only been in Iraq for 2 months but was already on his way to becoming a very strong Marine- He will be missed more than words can say. I love my son very much and will always keep him in my heart, close to me.

Cindi

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June 22, 2006

I have no friends or relatives fighting in the war against terrorism. I read so many moving stories from the families of the fallen. This soldier, SPC Keith Maupin, is our only POW at this point from the war in Iraq. After reading a current story by his parents in one of the online newspapers where they have not given up hope, I wanted to share that hope with them and pray that their son does come home safely. My bracelet is a symbol of hope for the Maupin family.

Pete

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June 21, 2006

I ordered this bracelet in memory of my cousin killed in South Vietnam. My daughter had a project in school to interview a vet about his/her experience. We told the history of Kyle J Coles from a letter written by his friend to Kyles mother shortly after his death. The letter told of how Kyle had volunteered to take his friends spot on a mission to deliver supplies to Marines. Kyle's helicopter was hit by an NVA rocket propelled grenade. Kyle and the crew were all killed. Our family thought in remembrance of Kyle and on Veterans Day we would order the bracelet to remind us of the sacrifices made by our military and their families.

Elliott F.

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June 21, 2006

I ordered this bracelet in memory of my best and oldest friend...Benny "Gray" Cockerham. Gray was KIA in Oct. '05 in Iraq. He was in the USMC. I am in the AF and I am currently deployed in Iraq. I will never forget him. God Bless

Paul

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June 13, 2006

I had wanted one for a while, but had held out because I always hoped to get one that looked nice. When I saw that you offered VOT bracelets too, I decided that was the way to go. MAJ Hogan was the only 40-year-old Reservist from Florida on your list. (I'm a 40-year-old Reservist from Florida too.) I'll wear it as a daily reminder of the insignificance of my own family's small sacrifices during my year-long deployment to Iraq for OIF1 as compared to the overwhelming sacrifice of nearly 3000 families on 11SEP01 and the nearly 1200 families in the 3 years since. May GOD bless MAJ Hogan's family, and may GOD continue to bless America!

Maria

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June 13, 2006

My husband's last name is Saucedo and we were wondering if any Saucedo's had fought in Vietnam. I visited the Vietnam Memorial site and found 1 Saucedo had gone to Vietnam. Rogelio Saucedo was the only one who served during this time. There isn't much information about him only the specifics as to when he entered the Army and when he died. My husband honors this man who sacrificed his life by wearing his name on his wrist every day. He tells me this is the most heartfelt gift (my giving him the bracelet) he has ever received. You see, my husband doesn't know anything about the paternal side of the family but carries the name. He isn't close to his father or his father’s family. The name Saucedo is not a common name in the Hispanic community and we have wondered if he is related in anyway. We are researching this now.

Paul

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June 13, 2006

MAJ Hogan was the only 40-year-old Reservist from Florida on your list. (I'm a 40-year-old Reservist from Florida too.) I'll wear it as a daily reminder of the insignificance of my own family's small sacrifices during my year-long deployment to Iraq for OIF1 as compared to the overwhelming sacrifice of nearly 3000 families on 11SEP01 and the nearly 1200 families in the 3 years since.

May GOD bless MAJ Hogan's family, and may GOD continue to bless America!

Barb and Roy

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June 11, 2006

My husband and I chose Matt M. because he is currently our only POW from Iraq. We don't know him personally. I know there is also Speicher from Desert Storm and God knows too many to count from Vietnam, but Matt is from THIS time and THIS war. If ever there was hell on earth, it's in Iraq, and Matt had the courage to go. I have a 17-year-old boy turning 18 in June. Will he have to go? Wearing Matt's name on our wrist is the very least we can do. Maybe others will begin asking us about OUR bracelets and it will help remind people the price everyday American families are paying. My heart aches for them all.

Nicholas

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June 11, 2006

I am a navy corpsman who recently returned from Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 and was wounded in action. One of my best friends was killed in action, LCPL Kelly, I was the corpsman working on him when he passed away. This is a way to keep LCPL Kelly to live on forever. 

Aunt Nee

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June 5, 2006

I ordered my bracelet to honor my 19 year old nephew, Pfc. Chase Austin Edwards, USMC from Lake Charles, LA, who was killed by an IED in Al Anbar, Iraq on April 6,2006. Chase was a 2005 honor graduate of Barbe High School, who left the day after graduation for boot camp. Chase signed up for the Marine Corp while a junior in high school along with his two best friends. We think it was Chase's destiny to be a Marine. There is a picture of him as a little boy dressed all in camo clothes with a backpack, canteen and his toy gun. This picture appeared in the slide show visitation followed by a picture of him at 29 Palms dressed in camo clothes with his gun. Chase did not enter the Marine Corp on a whim. He began his freshman year reading and researching the history of Marine Corp. The local recruiter commented that "he should have been on the other side of the desk" the day he came to sign up. We all tried to talk him out of joining during wartime but Chase would only reply that he thought he could make a difference. The day he was killed he spoke with his mother and told her things were heating up where he was and many in his unit were worried. When she asked how he was, he replied "I am at peace." He said his prayers and listened to a CD made for him by his friends. He did this before and after each mission. The impact he had on our small town was acknowledged by an intense outpouring of support by the community. We will miss him but take comfort in knowing that "Our Angel is a Marine"

Anonymous

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June 2, 2006

Serving in the United States Navy, I know the sacrifice that the men and women make serving their country. I wanted to be reminded every day and to remind people every day that there are still troops overseas serving their country and to remind them to keep them in their thoughts and prayers. The reason that I picked SN Pabolito Pena Briones Jr, is because I was a Seaman when I was medically discharged from the navy. I wanted to wear a bracelet of somebody that was in the navy and then to find somebody that had died for their country and the same rank as me, was neat.

Dan

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June 2, 2006

LTC Michael E McLaughlin was our son and his whole family is very proud of the sacrifice he made to help keep this country safe but to also help the people of Iraq obtain some of the freedoms we take for granted. He was making history in that part of the world. In six short months, he gained the trust of the local tribal leaders and convinced them to have members of their tribes to volunteer for the police force and the Army. There were over 750 Iraqi civilians who came to volunteer because of LTC MAC efforts. He was awarded the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, the Combat Action Badge, the Purple Heart, The War on Terrorism Medal, and the Iraq Freedom Medal. To wear the bracelet inscribed with his name is a honor and a privilege.

Dan M.

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June 2, 2006

My friend Christopher Schornak was killed near Baghdad on Feb. 26, 2006. He left behind a wife and a son. The bracelet is a reminder for people of why we fight, and why we must finish our missions overseas.

Linda Z.

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June 1, 2006

I have just returned from a fourteen month deployment to Abu Ghraib, Iraq. I am a nurse and was working in the emergency room when CPL Richard Waller was brought in gravely injured. Sadly we were unable to save him. I will never forget him. I think of him and his wife and three children often.

Manuel R.

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May 31, 2006

I served in Iraq from 2003-2004 with Task force 1st Armored Division and the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment. Command Sergeant Major Eric Cooke was "Ready 7", our Brigade Sergeant Major. He was killed in action on Christmas Eve of 2003. CSM Cooke was a NCO that always visited the troops and was always concerned about the welfare of his soldiers. Anyone who wears a bracelet of a trooper who gave their life, wears it so that we never forget. Me and every soldiers who fought along side me will not forget what they died for. Today I marched in a Memorial Day Parade, and it saddened me to see a low turnout. I hope and pray that America has not forgotten our fallen. For the ones that did come, they warmed my heart as they yelled "Thank you for your service!" and "God Bless our troops!" They are the reason I serve, they make out great country worth fighting for. The day I don't get a chill down my spine when the National Anthem is played, is the day I need to find a new profession. God Bless.

Noel W.

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May 30, 2006

I ordered a bracelet in memory of my Uncle Theus Joseph "Jody" Pound who was KIA February 8, 1969 in Vietnam. My grandmother passed away a year ago and was always fearful that people would forget Uncle Jody. I wear this bracelet to make sure that we don't forget the ultimate sacrifice he made for freedom.

Anonymous

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May 19, 2006

Wearing it is very humbling for me. When I was a teenager I had a POW bracelet during the Vietnam War. I remember how close it made me feel to the guys who were over there. I didn't understand the war at that time; shoot, who does understand war? I was young and it wasn't talked about in my home. I just know I felt a connection then and I feel a connection now and NEED to show my support. No matter how small. I'll wear it in honor of Sgt. Keith Maupin, his brothers in arms and our country.

Eric T.

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May 19, 2006

One of our great leaders and soldiers (SSG. Mark Wall) died here in Mosul, Iraq due to natural causes. My buddies and I orders bracelets with Mark's name. Now we wear our bracelets in remembrance of SSG. Mark Wall, we won't forget him.

Sean G.

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May 17, 2006

I bought it because she was my troop as well. I was one of her supervisors and I was proud of her service, and remain so to this day. A1C Jacobson was the first Air Force Security Forces member killed in action since the Vietnam War and also the first female SF member to be killed in action. We dedicated the main gate of Goodfellow AFB, TX in her name.

Joseph R.

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May 13, 2006

SSG Jeremy Brown was truly a professional solider who excelled at his job and set the example for all around him to follow. He had already been to Afghanistan prior to me meeting him, and could brighten up our tent with the tales of his prior deployment, which I am sure he did with his team within the 3rd ACR. I am honored to have known and served alongside him.

Anonymous

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May 9, 2006

The reason I purchased the Kenneth Pease Bracelet. He is from my home town and went to school in the same school I attended. When he got killed in Vietnam I was only 11 but remember the sadness among the community. There was a plaque in the school "in Memory" of Kenneth. The school burned back several years ago and I was working for the Mayfield Fire Department. The Volunteer Departments called and needed assistance. I was not on duty that night but heard the fire call so I responded from my house in my personal vehicle. When I reached the school the front (office) area was on fire and the first thing I thought of was the plaque of Kenneth in Uniform. I entered the building, without SCBA, fire gear or hose line to retrieve the plaque before the fire got to it. It was very smoky and very unsafe. I only thought that this young man had given his life for our country and community so I felt that I needed to save the plaque in honor of him.

Megan O'D

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May 4, 2006

I purchased this bracelet in memory of my dear friend Almar. I met Almar at Officer Candidate School in the summer of 2004. During the first few weeks Almar and I butted heads. He thought I was being arrogant hard headed, and I thought he just hated working with a girl. After a few months we became great friends. After that summer we communicated over the phone and through emails. He was just a great person. We had great conversations about life and family. I found out about Almar's death through an email my friend sent me.

His death hit me hard. Of all the people I know that have been to Iraq, Almar is the only fallen Marine that I have personally known. I was and am still in disbelief that I am not going to be able to talk to him again. I never want to forget Almar. I immediately knew I wanted a bracelet with his name on it. I feel it will help keep his memory alive, when people ask about why his name is on my arm, I can tell them all about this amazing young man I had the pleasure of calling my friend.

Douglas C.

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April 4, 2006

I ordered the bracelet to honor fallen US Army soldier Joshua A Terando. He helped to save my life when I was wounded on October 20th near Habbaniyah, Iraq. When I was shot by a sniper in the left hip Josh came to my aid fearlessly knowing that the sniper already had a bead on me. He confronted me and dragged me to safety so I could be treated by the medic and evacuated. His actions brought me valuable time because the bullet had severed the artery and I was bleeding internally severely.

Approximately 3 weeks later Josh was killed by a sniper in the same area. I never got to thank him for his help or for being one of my best friends. This bracelet is just a small way to show my gratitude for his selfless service and to keep his memory alive. Thank you Josh, I love you brother.

Anonymous

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April 1, 2006

My brother is a police officer here in Chicago, and I pray for him every day...but then again I pray for those from 9-11. I am also proud of him and every other police officer out there risking their lives every day so we can have a safe neighborhood and country. Sept. 11, 2001 was the worst day America has had for many decades. I want to show my respects for those who risked their lives in New York by wearing my bracelet. I picked P.O. Moira Smith because she was the only female Police Officer from NY that died that day. And being a female myself I have even greater respects for woman because it just goes to show that women can also do a man’s job, even if it does mean risking our lives for our country.

Tammy

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March 30, 2006

LTC Michael E. McLaughlin, KIA 01/05/2006 is my husband, the father to my 2 beautiful girls, and the love of my life. Mike was killed in Ramadi at the Glass Factory while organizing over 700 Iraqi police recruits. He was told that previous recruiting efforts only brought out few Iraqi men and he would in no way be successful. My husband was not one person to be told "things could not or would not happen". His efforts over the 6 months he was in Iraq brought close to 1000 recruits in 2 days. Mike was the Information Operations Officer as well as the Fire Support Office for the 2nd Brigade. He basically created the guidelines for the IOO position and made friends in Ramadi with the Sheiks, community members, etc. He was making a difference as are all our troops fighting the global war on terrorism. Wearing this bracelet is one large way I can carry on his legacy and his memory. He is a true American Hero to me and everyone who knew him.

Anonymous

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March 30, 2006

Sgt Peralta gave his life by jumping on a grenade after being shot 6 times by insurgents in Fallujah. He saved four Marines from the blast and is currently up for the Medal of Honor. Peralta came to our unit from 1/8 after re-enlisting. He was a hard leader who was well liked amongst all the Marines in our Company. We spent most of our time hanging out in the local bars of Wiakiki.

Anonymous

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March 30, 2006

Cpl Cohen was one of my first new guy's. He was killed by enemy fire when entering a room in Fallujah in November of 2005. Cohen was one of the nicest guys I have had the privilege to meet. He would have done anything for his brothers.

Anonymous

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March 30, 2006

Cpl Grimes was an outstanding human being as well as Marine. I played on the Battalion football team with him. He had adopted the name "Grimesy" from those who knew him best. He was killed when his helicopter went down while transferring to another city.

Anonymous

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March 30, 2006

1st Lt Travis Fuller was a Lt with Charlie 1/3. I was in Alpha and got to know Travis through my platoon commanders, who we would party with in town. Travis was a New Englander like myself. He was a quiet but awesome leader. He passed when his helicopter crashed on the way to another city.

Jodi B.

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March 28, 2006

I was a civilian contractor working with the Army and met this soldier, SPC Sam Boswell while he was in training to be sent over to Iraq. He had a great personality and a great smile. We shared the same last name which was what originally started us taking to one another.

While he was stationed where I worked, he made several visits in to see us, and just be his normal friendly self. I had felt like he was truly a friend when he left there. He wasn't in Iraq long when he was killed and I found out from the death notices released by the DOD at our work. I was devastated and felt as if I had truly lost a great friend. Wearing the bracelet with his name on it seemed only the right thing to do and I am proud to wear it!

SGT Rita

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March 20, 2006

SFC Morrison was a friend of mine who died in an IED Explosion back in Sept. I email his wife and we have become good friends. Sometimes life seems so unfair and sometimes we question our Faith because we are so devastated by the circumstances before us that it overwhelms us but I know that we serve a Mighty General who will someday revile all this to us and regardless of the pain or the scars that this War has left in us we have made some wonderful friends along the way and with this experience I have learned to place my Faith regardless of the circumstance at the foot of the Cross and let God handle it for me because it is just too much for me to carry. I have learned that there is no substitute for the value of family and friends.

Pecos L.

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March 18, 2006

I am currently serving with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq. I purchased a KIA bracelet with the name of my cousin LCPL Johnathan Kyle Price on it because I wanted to always remember what he gave for his country no matter where I was or what I was doing. I feel that is the number one purpose of these bracelets and I am proud to wear the one with my cousins' name on it. Our family has been through some really rough times with three of my cousins deploying before, but none has been as rough as losing Kyle. No one ever thinks it will happen to their family. I mean the odds are with us, but you don't really know until it hits home.

Kenny W.

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March 15, 2006

I lost a dear friend of mine while fighting in the Enduring Freedom Conflict's. SRA Jason Cunningham, USAF Pararescueman, fought and died for his country. Seeing Jason's name on a bracelet really has brought back a lot of emotions, he is missed. Jason was a great solider and a close friend, today and the next he will remain me a hero!

David P.

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March 9, 2006

One of the bracelets I ordered was CPT Ralph J. Harting III who was my company commander. He was killed by a car bomb south of Baghdad. It was his last patrol in sector before he did a change of command and moved on. He was with his replacement when a suspicious van headed for a US position pulled over. Both got out, inspected the individual and the van. When the driver went to open the trunk the van had exploded and CPT Harting and his replacement CPT Stephen Frank were killed instantly. This was especially hard on me because CPT Harting's wife and my wife were real close. Not to mention the fact that he had two kids and his wife was nine months pregnant with the third. She delivered another boy the day before his funeral.

David P.

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March 9, 2006

The bracelet I had ordered was my driver/Bradley Fighting Vehicle gunner SGT Mark A. Maida. I had been rotated out of the platoon and moved on to the mortar platoon when I heard that SGT Maida had been killed by an improvised explosive device. This was especially hard not only because he way my right hand man but because he was sitting in my seat when he was killed. To make a long story short he should have been driving, however he had pulled guard duty all night so his squad leader drove. He rode in the front passenger seat, the vehicle commanders seat, when an IED detonated on his door.

Don G.

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March 7, 2006

Greg Frampton was a fellow soldier that I have known for a long time. He and I went to advanced schooling for the Blackhawk Helicopter together at Ft Eustis. We had become close friends. Unfortunately his aircraft crashed in Afghanistan and he was one of my fellow aviators that lost his life defending the freedoms we enjoy today.

Sharon

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February 23, 2006

I received my Memorial Bracelet two days ago and haven't taken it off since. I love it, it is a great way to pay tribute to a fallen solider. SFC Rudy A. Salcido was my son's, (SPC Clifford C. Skinner) best friend and sergeant. They were both in Iraq when on November 9, 2006 the truck in which Skinner was driving and Salcido was riding in, was struck by an IED. SFC Salcido was killed and SPC Skinner was wounded. I will wear Rudy's bracelet proudly, as he is truly an American Hero.

Marianne

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January 27, 2006

They are in remembrance of our nephew, Frank T. Carvill, who was killed in action on June 4, 2004. Frank, age 51, the first member of the N.J. National Guard killed since WWII, was due to leave IRAQ that day for a 2 week leave. One of the young men in his unit wanted to get home to attend his grandmother’s funeral. Frank gave up his seat for that young man. He also was the driver of the HUMVEE, but since this was his second run that day, he let someone else drive. The driver survived. Frank also survived both terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center where he worked. Frank was a very humble, giving, charitable person who is missed by his family and many, many friends. Sometimes when I prayer for his soul to be in heaven, I stop and say “if Frank is not in heaven already then I have no chance of making it”. I know he is in a much better place but I miss seeing and talking to him.

2005

Anonymous

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December 16, 2005

My daughter's boyfriend, Dennis J. Ferderer, was killed in action in Iraq on November 2, 2005. He and my daughter had known each other for one year. Dennis was deployed last January. He came home on leave in late September and could visit with my daughter his last few days before returning to duty. They planned to continue dating when he returned to Fort Benning this January. They talked to each other for about an hour on the phone early Monday morning, October 31st. It was unusual for Dennis to be able to talk that long when he called. On Thursday afternoon, just before my daughter was supposed to go take a major Biology test, a friend of Dennis' called and told her that Dennis had been killed on Wednesday. My daughter has had a hard time dealing with this loss but she could leave school and attend his funeral in North Dakota. His family was wonderful to her. She has returned to Georgia Tech where she attends college and is trying to catch up with what she missed and get on with her life although she's still so sad. She keeps saying she doesn't want anything for Christmas but I think she will like this bracelet and it will be a way to make others aware of the mounting numbers of soldiers that are dying almost every day. 

Anonymous

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December 6, 2005

 the reason why I have the bracelet I have, well I'm sure we all remember 9-11, I was stationed at Wright Patterson AFB as the Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of Resource Protection. As soon as the first plane hit moments later we were scrambling to initiate what's called a barrier plan, its enables the base police more control of traffic and safety for those on Base. Later, throughout the day I was able to get a phone call from my mother who informed me my 3rd cousin, Brian Kinney was on board Flight 11. I have much memorabilia from Sep 11, many news articles, pictures all on a large post it Memory board but when I saw my cousins name on your site I had to have it, thank you for helping me to remember my cousin every day.

Anonymous

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November 8, 2005

The 11th ACR had not been deployed since Vietnam in the 60s. It was a big deal to be deployed from the NTC which concentrates strictly on training units on today’s urban warfare scenarios. Now we were put to the test. Unfortunately, on 24 May 2005, we lost a great soldier and friend, SFC Randy Collins. I remember seeing him at dinner, then shortly after our FOB was attacked by mortars. He unfortunately was hit and did not make it. So, we honored him by wearing this bracelet. To show that we care and miss him

Jessica

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August 16, 2005

Sgt Brandon M. Read was my fiancé. We had been friends for 2 years and when he received his orders to go to Iraq, we talked whenever he had free moments and on June 9th we moved our friendship into a dating relationship and on June 12, he asked me to marry him. I said yes of course. We were going to get married right before he left on July 31, but time got away from us and we didn't get a chance to get married. He left July 31, 2004 for Iraq. We decided that as soon as he got home in 2005, we would go to the Chaplin and get married when he got home. He was over in Iraq for a month when his vehicle was hit by an IED. He was killed instantly. The only casualty in the convoy. He had volunteered to take the gunner post since the soldier who was scheduled to do it was afraid. Brandon was always one to step in and help anyone. He also would tell me when I talked to him how much he loved being in the gunner post. He was killed Sept 6, 2004, Labor Day. He was one of the finest, bravest soldiers I have ever known and will always be remembered for his willingness to help anyone. Thank you so much for offering these bracelets for us to always remember those loved ones we have lost.

Yvonne

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April 6, 2005

Where I work, we are not allowed to wear jewelry in the print shop and yet I have not been told to take it off. One of my supervisors looked at it and asked me why I chose the person I did. The company I work for understands what these men and women have done for others and us in the country. I purchased the bracelet so that my children and those around me do not forget those who are the true hero’s. I wish I could tell Mr. and Mrs. Edinger that I am so very proud to wear Benjamin’s name on my bracelet.

Frank

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April 6, 2005

My friend from childhood, Stephen Lamantia, died on September 11 while working for Cantor Fitzgerald on the 102nd floor. No remains of Steve were ever found. He left a wife and two young children. My father and uncles and many friends are or were NYC policemen and firemen and I felt the pain of the families that I saw on television or read about in the newspapers. I was born in the Bronx and went to college in Brooklyn at L.I.U. I remember looking over the bridges and seeing the Towers as if they were there forever. I cannot think of the skyline without them. I now live in Syracuse and it is only 300 miles from the city, it is a world away to many of the people up here. Some would say that only the buildings collapsed, but a part of the greatest city in the greatest country in the world collapsed that horrific morning! Many innocent people and unknowing heroes were taken from us that day. My 6-year-old son's birthday is September 12 so it is a bittersweet time of the year for me.

Ben

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April 6, 2005

I briefly met Paul Nakamura through a mutual friend several years ago. Even though our meeting was very short, I was impressed by him. He was a confident young man, well spoken, polite and a credit to his family name. His dream in life was to help others; He wanted to be a male nurse and needed money for school, so he joined the Army Reserve as a Medic. He said the training that he received as a Medic would also help him in his civilian job as a male nurse. When I found out that he lost his life serving us I started trying to find a way to honor his memory. By wearing a bracelet with his name on it I will be reminded daily of his sacrifice for us and it will also remind me to help others when I can. Paul T. Nakamura is a True American Hero to me! Thank you for the great service that you make available to us so we can honor our Heroes!

Robert

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April 4, 2005

The one I purchased has the name John A. Chapman, TSGT, USAF, who was a Special Tactics Combat Controller. He was the first CCT member KIA in Operation Enduring Freedom. I am a former Combat Controller and a life member of the Combat Control Association, and I attended the CCT 50th Anniversary Reunion in the fall of 2003. There was a special ceremony at Hurlburt Field, dedicating a memorial to TSGT Chapman and other fallen Special Tactics airmen, and his widow was in attendance. I did not know the man, as I served back in the 1970's, but I feel a special kinship and camaraderie with USAF Combat Controllers, and hold them especially in prayer in the war on "terrorism." Thanks for doing your part.

Marla

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April 1, 2005

The family for which I had ordered these bracelets in memory of CPL Ian Zook, his parents and sister, just received them and they were very pleased to receive them and very satisfied with them. Our son, LCPL Drew Uhles, was killed in Iraq on September 15, 2004. One of the Marines who helped tend to him that day was CPL Ian Zook. On October 12, 2004, Ian was killed. Through several coincidences our families were able to get into contact with each other and have become very good friends and support for each other. It is a way to keep his memory right there with us and to let other people know of his sacrifice. We appreciate everything you do.

Kurt

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March 29, 2005

When the Trade Center collapsed, we lost a fellow Arizona horseman there. His name is Gary Bird. I had the chance to ride with him a bit at a mutual friend's ranch. He left behind quite a legacy of caring and service to his family, friends and community. I attended his memorial and came to understand the caliber of human being that these radical Islamic terrorists took from us. During a business trip to New York a year after the attack, I visited Ground Zero and found his name on plaque listing all who were lost there.

Greg

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March 25, 2005

The reason I ordered this person, is because I was involved. I was the platoon leader on QRF the night that his tank was hit with an IED. We responded to the site, to find an Abrams tank blown into two pieces. We pulled the bodies out of the tank. Two were medevac and one we were unable to retrieve until we got some heavy equipment in. That next morning, we retrieved SPC Campoy's body. I loaded his body into my vehicle and drove him an hour to the nearest medical facility. I will never forget those two long days. Thank you very much.

2004

Anonymous

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October 14, 2004

The bracelet I ordered has CPL Jefferey Lawerence name on it. I was friends with him in high school and attended his funeral this summer. I felt that getting his name on a bracelet would be my way of keeping his memory and sharing his courage with others.

1LT Wesley

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October 14, 2004

On OCT 3, 2003 one of my soldiers, PFC Charles Sims, drowned. He was one of the most mature 18-year-old that I had ever met. He had a bright future ahead of him. At that time, I only knew his family through letters. I wrote to each of my junior soldiers (E4 and below) families to ensure that the families were kept informed. This bracelet will stay on my wrist until the day I die to remind me of how precious a human life is and that preserving a human life is the most important thing a leader can do.

Geoff

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October 12, 2004

I found your site by searching Gunnery Sgt. Baum's name on the Internet. I am running in the Marine Corps Marathon in honor of GS Baum and when I came across your site, I wanted to purchase a bracelet in his name. I did not know him, but I have an extreme respect for anyone that has served or is serving for our country.

Anonymous

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October 10, 2004

I also ordered the bracelet for Sirius because my heart broke for the Port Authority Police officer who told the dog to stay. I have lost my faithful companions and I can't imagine how this officer felt. Thanks for this wonderful way to remember.

Anonymous

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October 8, 2004

This year I decided to finally order my bracelet. The site offered a random selection of names. Felix A. Vale was the random selection. Before I placed my order, I looked up his memorials online. I found that he was only 29 years old, and lived with and supported his mother. His little brother also died that day at the WTC (he had gotten him a job). I was saddened that only one friend wrote an obituary note. I had found that personal touch with Felix. I returned to your site and ordered the bracelet.

Thelma

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October 8, 2004

Raymond Losano was our nephew. He was like a son to my husband and myself. I stood across from him as his first child was born and watched a boy become a man/father. We took him to the recruiter the last time he went to sign his final papers. Losing him was like losing our own son who is in the US Navy and was in Iraq aboard the USS Constellation when his cousin was killed. His wife and children (his wife was expecting their second child when he died) live here in Tucson so we see them very often, just as Raymond would have wanted us to. His parents live in TX so we are the kid’s grandparents here in Tucson. Raymond lived here when he joined the AF. Again, I love my bracelet and after I show it to other family members, I'm sure we will be ordering more.

Robert

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October 5, 2004

Through his family, I could follow his career. In my opinion Shawn was a soldier’s soldier. I won’t list his entire (I think) eight-year career, but Shawn was a sniper and a member of the 10th Mountain out of Fort Drum, NY. He had been deployed to Afghanistan, and was serving there at the time of his death. Although Shawn was my son’s brother-in-law, it still hurts me to think of Shawn in terms as final as death. Shawn had talked with my son about going on motorcycle rides with us when he returned to the states. We (my two sons’ and I) also recently have taken up the sport of paintball, and I am certain Shawn would have played that with us when he could. I would have loved to have him on our team! Shawn also left behind a three-year-old son who is so much his image. When I think that this little boy will grow up without his father makes me think of how lucky I was to have had my father for 49 years of my life…and what a terrific sacrifice Shawn made for his country.

Jeff

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October 2, 2004

I ordered this bracelet because my neighbor was the American Airline pilot that hit the world trade center. John Ogonowski was a great man and did a lot of great things from my town of Dracut, Massachusetts. He was well liked by all and left his three daughters and wife behind.

Bill

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September 26, 2004

I chose Sara E. Low because I have flown American Airlines a lot, and when I saw her name on the roster, I decided it would be fitting. This is just my way of remembering someone who perished. I did a little research on Sara and found out that she held 2 degrees, and yet continued to do what she loved the most.... Fly. I consider it a privilege to be able to show my support and wear this bracelet in Sara's honor.

Tami

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September 25, 2004

Susan Santo was a close friend of mine. She was in tower 2 working that day. Thank you for offering this special opportunity to pay tribute to her, I miss her so much. She was a wonderful person.

Diana

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September 23, 2004

My mother has been an EMS supervisor for the City of Alexandria for 6 years and a paramedic for 12 years and my Dad is a retired Battalion chief for the same department. I was raised in the Fire Department and will die with the fire department (my mother and I have side-by-side boxes for our ashes in the Fire Department memorial here in the city). Andrew Fredericks was a fire fighter for our city for years and finally got the call to work in New York. Our city and country lost a great man (along with many others) that day and this is the one way I can wear his badge of courage on my sleeve (or wrist).

Susan

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September 20, 2004

The bracelet I ordered, SSGT Scott Sather, was my friend's husband. They had been married a year when he was killed. They deserved more time together in this world. Thanks for a nice way for me to remember Scott

Ashel

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September 19, 2004

The reason I ordered the bracelets is to honor my friend Daniel Romero who was killed in Afghanistan. Daniel and I served in the Army together, attending Special forces training in 1991. Always a warrior Daniel was still serving with SF when he was killed.

Anonymous

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September 7, 2004

I am a flight attendant and I wanted to have this bracelet to remember what happened to all those who lost their lives on 9/11. I chose crew member Sara Low because she and I are both from Arkansas. Although I did not know her personally, I do know a close friend of hers. I want her family and friends to know that she is missed by many and will never be forgotten. I will wear this bracelet in Sara's memory every time I fly.

Naomi

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August 28, 2004

I am an active duty Airman in the United States Air Force stationed at Keesler Air Force Base and first heard of Sgt. Michael Curtin when I was applying for Marine Corps Officer Candidate School. Sgt. Michael Curtin was an exceptional man who served his country as a Marine and later for the NYPD. I feel he and all the others who have lost their lives during this battle against terrorism must be remembered and your bracelets do just that.

Susan

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August 26, 2004

I chose Firefighter Cherry because he volunteered his time for Songs Of Love which gathers information from chronic and terminally ill children, about their friends, hobbies, family, pets etc. and writes a one of a kind song just for that child. We, Dogs In Service. have worked with children that have been recipients of songs from Songs Of Love. We have seen how much the children use the tapes to help them cope with treatments, isolation etc. We also worked from September 2001 to January 2002 at Liberty State Park with some of the victim's families, friends as well as first responders. On a personal level, I want to continue to honor those first responders, both the ones that died and the ones who tried to help. I thought the bracelet would do just that. Thank you, Firefighter Cherry - and everyone else who tried to help.

Denise

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August 24, 2004

My friend's brother-in-law, Andrew Jordan, was with the NYFD. He was killed at the WTC - responding with his company. His body was never found. He was the father of 3 children with a fourth on the way. I think many people are forgetting how we felt that day - myself included. I don't want to forget the horror and what we lost - we need to remember to be strong. I also don't want to forget the sacrifice that people made - it reminds me of what it means to be American - of our overall goodness.

Anonymous

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July 14, 2004

I ordered a KIA bracelet in remembrance of Army Staff Sgt. Wentz Shanaberger who was killed in an ambush in Iraq. He was a platoon leader of a Military Police unit investigating suspicious rebels on March 24th when he was struck by enemy fire. As a new Private, I remember Shanaberger when I first arrived to Fort Polk, La. right after Basic Training and MP school. We worked together for many years and deployed to Panama in 1999 as the last Military Police unit before the U.S. turned over control of the Panama Canal to the Panamanian's. I left the Army just before 9-11, but Wentz continued to serve his country and sacrifice the time he could have spent with his wife and five children. I wasn't surprised to hear he was still in the Army or that he died in combat. The Sergeant loved the Army and loved the job he did in the Army. It was a real shame to lose a great soldier and trainer of soldiers. Your bracelet will help me keep an old friend’s memory alive and will show others who see it that this country has the greatest military members on earth. Wentz will surely serve as a great soldier in Gods Army now.

Anonymous

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July 10, 2004

I ran across your site when looking for stories on my friends Jonas Panik and Tristan Aitken (who was killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom) and had to have one. The story of why I ordered the bracelet should be summed up when I said I was a friend with US Navy Lt. Jonas M. Panik. Thanks for such a beautiful bracelet and a beautiful tribute to my lost friend.

Anonymous

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June 29, 2004

I ordered this bracelet for my boyfriend. We lost a very close friend on 9/11. His name is Robert Cordice. He was my boyfriend's best friend. Someone had purchased a bracelet for my boyfriend right after 9/11 - which he wore day & night. He loved the bracelet, as it was a constant reminder of Rob. Unfortunately, he lost it and was extremely upset. I could not wait to give it to him - and I can't tell you how happy he was to receive it!

Anonymous

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June 20, 2004

I ordered this bracelet because Officer Moira Smith was the only female police officer killed on September 11th. Being a female patrol officer with the Lafayette City Police Department in Lafayette, Louisiana, I wanted to pay my respects to her bravery. I read somewhere that the last time anyone saw her, she was in the lobby of one of the towers helping terrified people to get out, while she stayed inside and did not succumb to the terror that she, herself was feeling. For that, she deserves to never be forgotten. I wear her name on my left wrist, with pride.

Anonymous

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June 20, 2004

They definitely are sturdier than the last bracelets we had. My fiancé lost his in an airport. So I went on line and researched other places to get them. His best friend Bobby Coll, was working for Eurobrokers on 9/11 in Tower 2. He and his wife's cousin, Brett Bailey, died trying to save another lady. We miss him everyday. His 3-year-old son and 5-year-old daughter will be in our wedding in October.

Anonymous

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June 19, 2004

I ordered a bracelet with Nicole Miller's name on it because I knew her personally from my teenage years. We worked together at the same shoe store for about a year and we became decent friends. I didn't know that Nicole was a Flight 93 passenger until last August when I was home on leave. I noticed a small memorial at her former workplace; Chili's and it took a minute for it to sink in. I've been in the military since July of 1998 and I am a Security Force member in the Air Force. When 9/11 happened, I was hurt/angry like everyone else in the world and being in the military made a little more sense to me. Until that day, I went about my business and than I saw her memorial. 9/11 hit a little more close to home and I've now dedicated the rest of my military career to Nicole Miller's memory. Even though I hadn't seen Nicole since 1998, she was one of those people that you never forgot.

Anonymous

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June 19, 2004

I bought a bracelet as a birthday present for a fellow cop I know who is into POW and 9/11 stuff. Her last name is Smith and she is just a couple years younger than Moira so I knew that was the name she would want to wear. I have printed tons of information about Moira off the web to include with the bracelet. I can almost guarantee this officer will wear it for at least the rest of her career.

Anonymous

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June 19, 2004

I stumbled across the bracelet for Sirius. I supervise the K-9 team for our city police department. I work with a cop who is a great dog handler and all around good cop. I wanted to show some appreciation for the hard work he does and knew he would understand the significance of "representing" Sirius and his handler.

Anonymous

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June 19, 2004

Captain Mazza is a couple years older than I, but our police careers have been similar. My mother's maiden name is Matz, which was also like Kathy's name. My grandpa Matz served in the Army during WWII and died 8/9/01. It's important to me to remember the female cops that made the ultimate sacrifice that day. Kathy Mazza was a trailblazer for many other women to follow. I wear her name on my right wrist to remind myself, cops I work with and the public of her sacrifice and to instill in myself the obligation to make the same sacrifice in my work if the situation arises.

Anonymous

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June 19, 2004

I am also a reserve soldier and have 23 years of service. I chose SGT Thurman to represent the women who serve in our armed forces. We still are excluded from some jobs in the military because they are too dangerous, and yet female soldiers have been dying in the line of duty for decades. I went to basic training in Alabama, Thurman's home state. I wear her on my left wrist next to my watch. This bracelet is a little more personal. I wear her name to remind me that our Army consists of individuals. It's important for me to remember who they are and she reminds me of whom I am.

Anonymous

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June 17, 2004

I opted to get the name of an officer lost in the World Trade Center. John was quite the character growing up. Always getting into trouble and then some. Seeing him become a public servant (the same type he antagonized growing up) was a riot. I thought I was fortunate that those that I loved and hold dear were not injured in the incident, it was a rough couple of days, and given all the relatives I have in NYC. Then, in a small publication..."The Ukrainian Weekly", I read of our loss. Unfortunately, it fell through the cracks and I was not made aware of the situation and did not attend the wake or funeral. Purchasing this bracelet and donating to a wonderful organization has now become my way of honoring the man John Skala became in adulthood.

2003

Melissa O.

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December 1, 2003

As a child I wore a POW bracelet with James Bell on it for years. He was from my small town in MD. When I married, I married a soldier. As a CPT in the Army he went to Desert Shield/Storm for almost a year. I ordered bracelets then and proudly wore one with his name to keep him closer while he was away. As a COL he was assigned to the Pentagon. I'm pleased to say he is a Pentagon survivor but many of his peers were not. Now as we're in our 23rd year of military life, Bob will be joining our troops in Iraq in January. I ordered them this time for the same reason as last time, just as a reminder.

Maria D.

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November 15, 2003

As the Municipal Prosecutor of Weehawken, NJ, I have the honor and privilege of working with all the dedicated men and women of the Port Authority Police Department at the Lincoln Tunnel. And, I was fortunate enough to be able to call PO John Skala and PO Al Niedermeyer my friends.

I purchased the bracelets for two reasons: First and foremost, to honor the memory of John and Al. I will never forget them. Secondly, because although everyone always mentions the losses suffered by the FDNY and the NYPD, sadly, not too many people remember the 37 Port Authority Police Officers who made the ultimate sacrifice on September 11, 2001.

In proportion to the over all number of police officers in the PAPD, the rate of their losses was higher than any of the other rescue workers. They, together with the lost members of the FDNY and NYPD, must never be forgotten.

Maria D.

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November 15, 2003

As the Municipal Prosecutor of Weehawken, NJ, I have the honor and privilege of working with all the dedicated men and women of the Port Authority Police Department at the Lincoln Tunnel. And, I was fortunate enough to be able to call PO John Skala and PO Al Niedermeyer my friends.

I purchased the bracelets for two reasons: First and foremost, to honor the memory of John and Al. I will never forget them. Secondly, because although everyone always mentions the losses suffered by the FDNY and the NYPD, sadly, not too many people remember the 37 Port Authority Police Officers who made the ultimate sacrifice on September 11, 2001.

In proportion to the over all number of police officers in the PAPD, the rate of their losses was higher than any of the other rescue workers. They, together with the lost members of the FDNY and NYPD, must never be forgotten.

Amal A.

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October 20, 2003

I am in the Army and my Unit is deploying to Afghanistan this weekend. Sean Tallon and I were in High School together at Fordham Prep in the Bronx, NY. He was a few years older than me but I will always remember that he was a great friend.

Jessica E.

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October 10, 2003

My best friend, Lynne Morris, died on September 11th- she worked for Cantor Fitzgerald on the 101st floor, and I am always looking for ways to pay tribute to her...thanks so much for your bracelets...

Christine

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October 2, 2003

I received my Memorial Bracelet in honor of Diane Lipari who was taken from us during the attack on the World Trade Center. This bracelet has special meaning to me because she was the sister of a very dear friend of mine, Lorraine G., who I have only know through phone conversations over the past 10 years or so.

Next week, I will be flying to New York on business and will finally meet Lorraine and another dear friend Helen V. for the first time. Every day we remember all those who lost their lives during the 911 attack and hold them near to our hearts and pray for them and those they have left behind. God Bless America.

A.J.

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September 29, 2003

As a former Iraqi by birth, and a U.S. Marine by choice, wearing the bracelet is a symbol of my gratitude for Capt Speicher's sacrifice. Our prayers are with him and his family, and other POWs and their families.

Semper Fi,

David P.

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September 24, 2003

I knew Richard Ross who died on flight 11.

It will help me never forget what happened that day.

Aubrey W.

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September 17, 2003

I'm a captain in the US Air Force who was born and raised in Brooklyn. I attend Brooklyn Technical HS, Borough of Manhattan Community College and had jobs around the Wall Street area. I'm a New Yorker to the core.

For years I've seen my fellow airmen wear POW remembrance bracelets and always said one day I'd get one. While I was searching the internet for some 9/11 information, I came across your site. I ordered a Memorial Bracelet immediately.

I had many friends that worked in the WTC and my mother was trapped on the IRT during the blast. Thank God they all survived but I feel a connection to those that lost family and/or friends.

I let the site randomly select a name for me; Maria Isabel Ramirez. I plan to wear this bracelet for as long as I serve in the military. It will stand as a reminder of why I put on my uniform every day and give my all . . .for my family, for the Air Force and for NYC.

Virginia S.

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September 17, 2003

On September 11, 2001, we lived in a northern suburb of NYC. We were directly affected by the attacks on the Trade Center, as one of the FDNY firefighters (Paul Tegtmeier) who died went to our church, and he was a wonderful man. Needless to say, we lived the tragedy being so close for a long time, and not just because of knowing Paul. People remember very differently in New York.

We just moved our family to Pittsburgh late this summer. When the 2nd anniversary rolled around, we realized that people here remember very differently than those who were so close. We wanted to carry a tangible reminder for us of Paul, and to also remind those removed from the tragedy how it affected those in New York. We will never forget. God Bless America, New York, and the FDNY.

Matthew G.

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July 29, 2003

I always keep something on my wrist whether it is a rubber band or a homemade item. While I was at Sesame Place I was waiting in line when I saw a man wearing one of your bracelets. After speaking to him I learned that he was a NYC fireman and he told me to check on the internet for the bracelet. I picked Todd Beamer because he lived about 15 miles from my town and was the same age as me. Also because it makes you think how lucky we are to have each day. You never know when it may end.

Margie-Ann

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July 28, 2003

I bought 2 sizes of the same name. I gave the bracelet to my husband as a birthday gift. He was crushed when he found out our friend was a victim. I wore a POW bracelet in High School, which I returned to him when he came home. I also have a bracelet for the only man from Bayonne that did not return from Viet Nam.

Our friend Gerard "Rod" Coppola worked for WNET as an engineer and he split his time between the towers and the studio. He was in tower 1 above the impact zone, so he never came down. His remains were found Christmas day 2001.

I am an RN at Bayonne Medical Center in New Jersey, across the river from Ground Zero. We received patients that were able to RUN from the towers. I was privileged to take care of some of these brave people. I will never forget that terrible day. I will never forget those patients and the stories they told. I can no longer hear "God Bless America" without crying or having a lump in my throat. I will never forget. I WILL NEVER FORGET.

Julia C.

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July 28, 2003

I ordered a Memorial Bracelet in memory of my husband's former FDNY paramedic partner Carlos Rey Lillo who was killed on September 11, 2001. He was a wonderful funny sweet incredible happy peaceful handsome man whom we miss terribly. We have photos of Carlos, a golfball from his Memorial Scholarship Golf Outing, a Tee shirt of his, his CD player he sold to my husband to save money for his wedding. Photos of him and his wife at a wedding we were all at in July 2001. We have a memorial to him on our mantle and I thought your bracelet would be a fitting addition plus it benefitted a worthy cause, the Orphans fund.

Ron

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July 18, 2003

I am a Fire Captain with the Marin County Fire Department in Calif.

After 9-11 a friend at the Santa Rosa Fire Dept commissioned and painted a rendition of a firefighter emerging from the rubble of WTC. He did 343 paintings, one for each Firefighter who had lost their lives. I bought (all proceeds to the FDNY Widows and Orphans) one dedicated to Captain Patrick Waters.

In May of 2002 I was able to visit the house (Squad 288 - HazMat 1) that Capt Waters worked out of. That house in Queens lost the most, 19, Firefighters out of all the FDNY houses. I met some great guys and made some lifelong friends there.

KAREN

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July 9, 2003

THERE USED TO BE A TV SHOW CALLED "THE BRAVEST" THAT WAS SIMILAR TO "COPS", BUT FOR FIREFIGHTERS. I REALLY LIKED THE SHOW BECAUSE I HAVE QUITE A FEW FRIENDS WHO ARE FIREFIGHTERS. WHEN THE SHOW WAS TAPED IN NYC, THEY WOULD OFTEN SHOW RESCUE 1'S PEOPLE. LT. DENNIS MOJICA WAS ONE OF THE OFFICERS ON RESCUE 1 AND HE REALLY REMINDED ME OF A COMBINATION OF A NUMBER OF MY FRIENDS SO I KIND OF GOT "ATTACHED" TO HIM. I WAS VERY SAD TO FIND THAT HE WAS KILLED WHEN THE TOWERS FELL. HIS TEAM FOUND HIM 5 DAYS LATER. 7 9 03

Clayton

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May 23, 2003

The reason I chose Terence Adderley to be on my bracelet was that was my age (23) and from my home state (Michigan), in fact his parents are from my home town. As an EMT (E.R. Tech) I see many people every day & I am sure it will be a great reminder to me & them of all the lives lost that day. Both of my parents have Vietnam POW bracelets and I was always proud of them for keeping them so long! I hope when I have children they will feel the same when they learn about 9/11/01.

Stewart P.

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May 18, 2003

I chose to order two bracelets one to support our troops and one to remember a very dedicated lady and a native American who paid the highest price to be an American and the first native American female killed in combat defending her country’s right to exist. I do believe that women have the right to fight for their country just like the men and if they choose a combat job then they should be taken care of the best that is possible just like the men. No better no worse as they knew when they stepped into hell that it was a crap shoot if they would get home again and chose to continue. I am so proud of all the women who had anything to do with this war.

I got so sick of all the bad press that was and still is floating around by so called concerned politicians who really only care about their jobs not our young people who are dying for our right to be on this earth. I remember well what it was like when the Viet Nam War was going on and the troops being spit on and had garbage thrown at them when they came home. I am a disabled vet my self and will never walk away from a fight to defend our troops as they go were they are told and do the job they are told to do and some come home some don’t and still others wish they didn’t. War takes the feeling of life out of you as you are asked to kill other human beings.

Nothing and no training can make this go away, what must be done is to accept you did the best you could to get home yourself and bring your bodies home too but that doesn’t always happen. The question was what do we do until the first GI stepped into harms way. Then the question was what is needed and how fast and how much and where. No expense is to great to support our young men and women in uniform. We must show them and the world nothing is more important then their safety and to get them back home safe.

Lori Ann Piestewa gave her all for her country and no one can ask for more of any one of us and it is fitting that she should be remembered by all of her nation. Sleep well Lori you have done you mission here now it is up to those of left to make it worth the price you paid. Good night little one from kenyuta your brother of origin and service.

Melanie

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May 13, 2003

I ordered the MIA bracelet for Sgt. Edward J. Anguiano. The bracelet is great! I located your site while doing a search on adopting a soldier for my second grade class to write to. There are so many reasons why I decided to order it.

My family has a very large military history, including my grandfather who fought in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. My brother was in the ARMY for four years as well, and my father served in the National Guard. My brother had a POW bracelet from Vietnam, which I thought was a really neat thing.

I decided to order one from Operation Iraqi Freedom in order to show my support for our troops. I saw how hard it was for soldiers to return home from war after Vietnam, and I wanted these soldiers to know just how much support they had from the people back home. Most of the time all that was televised were war protestors, and you hardly ever hear stories of those who support the soldiers, so I thought it would be a great way to show my support for the men fighting in Iraq. Sgt. Anguiano is from Texas as well, and that's how I got his name. I will proudly wear it until everyone returns home that is missing and I am able to return it to either Sgt. Anguiano or his family.

John T.

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May 4, 2003

The bracelets are a nice tribute to my daughter and others whose lives have been taken by terrorists. Every little thing we do to keep Alicia’s memory alive helps in some small way. People have reached out to us in untold ways with love and compassion and it does help us through the pain of our loss and restores our faith in humanity. We are totally opposed to more violence against other innocent people as a way of combating terrorism and fervently hope that our world learns ways to communicate better, develop understanding and appreciation for those different than us, and work toward resolving conflict in a peaceful manner.

During this past year, I was approached by a man whom I vaguely knew in Columbus, Ohio. He had on one of your bracelets for Alicia. It brought tears to my eyes. Thank you for helping to keep her spirit alive.

a b

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May 2, 2003

I did receive my Memorial Bracelet and was very moved by it. I wear my bracelet in memory of my daughter, Jeannine, who was murdered on September 11. I hope everyone who sees it will always remember the horrific loss of life that day.

Rhonda S.

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April 25, 2003

The reason I wear my bracelet.... To keep the person close in heart and mind. To show support and hope. I do not know who Pvt. Jonathan L. Gifford is but when he is found and comes home I will try to send him this bracelet so he knows that we were all praying for him.

Lt. Richard R.

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April 20, 2003

I am a NY State Court Officer Lt. stationed in lower Manhattan. On 9-11-01 (as a Sgt.) I supervised a squad of Court Officers who responded to the WTC from our court house approx. ten blocks away. In the course of the rescue operations, 2 of my officers were killed. They were Senior Court Officers Thomas Jurgens and Mitchel Wallace. In addition, a Captain from our training academy was also killed. Capt. William Harry Thompson. The bracelet I ordered is in tribute to officer Jurgens, who was the youngest in the squad.

Janet W.

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April 18, 2003

I ordered this bracelet in response to the photograph I had seen of James Riley in the April 7th edition of Time magazine. It is a still of the Iraqi broadcast that was aired.

I was between sets working out, reading the magazine when I saw his picture. I saw the look on his face and i burst into tears, I could not help myself. It tore my heart out.

There were alot of guys working out around me, I had to excuse myself and went to sit by myself in the locker room and pray for him, for all of them. I wish they knew how many people's hearts they are in.

Susan G.

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April 15, 2003

I'm still wearing a POW bracelet from Vietnam. It was given to me when I started flying for Continental Airlines in 1971. Major Donahue is still listed as MIA. I will continue to wear his bracelet proudly, as I will my new one. - 4/13/03

Phyllis

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April 15, 2003

I received my Memorial Bracelet last week and have been wearing it ever since. My cousin, Dianne, was a flight attendant for American Airlines for 20 some odd years and just happened to be working on Sept. 11th on Flight 11. The first plane to crash into the world trade center.

Diane

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April 12, 2003

My sister was Judy Larocque. She was on AA Flight 11. I ordered the bracelets for my sister-in-law and my nieces. I also ordered one for my mother. One never recovers from our tragedy, but at least I will not let her be forgotten.

Michael B.

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March 19, 2003

I bought this bracelet to physically represent my pledge to never forget the cowardly attacks of September 11, 2001. I had Joseph Pycior’s name put on it because I served with him aboard USS W.S.Sims (FF 1059). He was killed in the attack on the Pentagon. It will be my honor to carry his memory with me for the rest of my life.

Cathy H.

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February 14, 2003

I ordered the bracelet because I used to wear a similar bracelet during the Viet Nam War and it's a tribute and a reminder of the people who lost their lives.

I picked Stephen Tighe because he was my girlfriend's brother, he worked for Cantor Fitzgerald. I also worked at the WTC but was lucky enough not to have been there on Sept 11th.

Phyllis M.

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February 14, 2003

We ordered these for Tommy Kuveikis and Larry Stack as they were old friends of ours. My husband is a retired FDNY officer and we lost many friends on Sept. 11th, but Larry and Tommy go way back, Larry for over 30 years and we were at Tommy's wedding. They will be missed by all who knew them.

Phyllis M.

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February 14, 2003

We ordered these for Tommy Kuveikis and Larry Stack as they were old friends of ours. My husband is a retired FDNY officer and we lost many friends on Sept. 11th, but Larry and Tommy go way back, Larry for over 30 years and we were at Tommy's wedding. They will be missed by all who knew them.

Marybeth H.

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January 22, 2003

I found your site as a result of a conversation with my sister. We had been talking about the old POW/MIA bracelets, of which she had one, and had heard about a similar thing for 9-11, but we were skeptical about the "profit-mongering" going on surrounding the tragedy.

Both my sisters, my husband, my brother-in-law, and I were volunteers at Ground Zero. Subsequently, we all, through our individual experiences, felt a connection to the victims, the rescue/recovery teams, and the other volunteers. I considered myself a very strong individual, and had no doubts about my ability to handle the emotional as well as the other aspects of my volunteer duties. I had been a volunteer firefighter for several years and still felt the camaraderie of that "brotherhood."

One of our "jobs" at Ground Zero was to deliver hot drinks (especially hot chocolate!) and snacks to the NYPD, FDNY, and other officers & workers at the perimeters of the "Pit" and the barricades surrounding the site. Many of these guys couldn't leave their posts to go to the food tent to get warm or just sit for a while. It was during one of these "runs" that I came upon one of the firefighter memorials. I went inside to say a prayer, and it was at this moment, staring at the photos of these brave men, that I broke down and cried. It was a turning point for me and a moment that will be with me forever. They were my brothers, even though I didn't know them personally. And even though I haven't been an active firefighter for many years, I still understood.

Well, when I finally got to your web site, I knew I wanted to choose a bracelet for a member of the FDNY. I went through a lot of the names & finally chose a firefighter, Michael Ragusa, who has (from what I could find out) never been found. I pray everyday for him and his family. I also purchased bracelets for my 2 sisters & my husband, who volunteered at Ground Zero with me. I knew I was going to get Chaplain Mychal Judge for my sister who felt a special connection to him (I'll let her tell her story) & my other sister I chose Ed Beyea, who's own sister is a teacher at our hometown school and a friend of ours.

Ed was confined to a wheelchair. His friend Abe wouldn't leave his side and they both perished in the collapse of the towers. For my husband, who is in law enforcement, I chose a Lt. Cirillo from the PAPD whose hometown was Nutley, NJ. My husband was born in Nutley. Anyway, that is my story.

Sorry it is so long....for me it's actually not long enough. There is so much I want to say to people so that we NEVER FORGET!!! As Americans, we always feel a need to "get over it & move on", but I want to say, YES, let's "move on" but don't EVER FORGET these people! I don't need a bracelet for a constant reminder, but I do wear it to honor all those who died and so that others will see me wearing it and remember! 1/22/2003

Chris H.

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January 16, 2003

I am a fire Lt in Lancaster County, PA and was deeply touched by the events of Sept 11, just as everyone else in our Country was. I chose FDNY Chaplain Judge because he epitomized the caring, compassion, and strength that all of the people involved in this tragedy exemplify. We will never forget and we will stand strong with Angels like Chaplain Judge watching over us from Heaven.

Nan B.

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January 16, 2003

I did not know Will Raub personally, but I have worked with his sister, Sue, since 1982, and through her I felt as though I knew him. They were very close - we all followed the vacations with their friends, his wedding and children, and, his safe escape (while helping some one else) in the earlier WTC truck bomb incident.

Sue had just been to Will's son Liam's baptism the weekend before, and thank God she took pictures. We all knew. when the buildings went down, that Will had been killed; he worked for Cantor Fitzgerald in WTC #1. It was a horrible day for our country, and for all the family and friends of those killed or injured that day, both in NYC and in Washington and Pennsylvania.

I asked Sue if she would mind if I wore a Memorial Bracelet, and she said no, it would be fine. It is just my small way of remembrance, other than contributions to the various funds.

Kala F.

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January 16, 2003

Hello, I received my Memorial Bracelet today and I am very happy with the way it turned out. You see I didn't know the young man whose name is on the bracelet and yet I felt drawn to have it engraved on it. Why I don't think I will ever know but that is ok.

I found out about the web site from a woman who came into my work. I noticed her's (it had NYPD on it) and commented on how much I liked it. Then she told me that she got it online at memorial bracelets.com and so when I got home from work that night I looked up your site and as I scrolled through the names and places I noticed that on flight 11 there was a person on that plane with every person in my immediate family's name. Myra, Mike, Alex, and Kathleen that was just odd all on the same plane all on the day they died. I don't know how many other people have that coincidence but I really took it to heart, and all the families with small children on the planes.

That day in September I cried for hours and hours. Why would anyone want to hurt so many Americans at the same times? That is what I thought, why us why there in New York, couldn't it have happened somewhere else to somebody else. But I guess when it is terrorism they don't care how many women and children and husbands they kill and that is what hit home for me.

Angie H.

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January 16, 2003

I want a bracelet because one of our greatest tools through life is our memory, we use it to do everything. Sometimes, though, our memories fail us and we forget the things that are most important.

Everyday when I look at my wrist I see the name Maj. James L. Carter, he was listed MIA in South Vietnam in 1966. It is then that I realize the cost of everything I have, not in dollars and cents, but in lives. For this same reason I wanted another bracelet remembering the life of some who died on Sept. 11th.

Sometimes it's hard to remember, but it must be done. There were people that day who got up and went about living their lives not knowing that before the sunset they would be heroes.

2002

Cindy

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January 29, 2002

I am good friends with a firefighter. I know the sacrifices that are made on a daily basis by these men and women. On 9/11/01, the ultimate sacrifice was made by over 300 members of the FDNY. I choose the name Joseph Hunter because he is still missing and he was my age.

Sonja M.

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January 24, 2002

My Dad is a disabled veteran and in need of a lung transplant. He was friends with General Timothy Maude when he was Colonel Maude while stationed in Germany. My father had been corresponding with General Maud via email and was expecting a visit from General Maude last November. General Maude was killed in the Pentagon on Sept. 11th, and I thought a Memorial Bracelet for my Dad with General Maud's name on it would be a wonderful gift to remember him by.

Mary Ann DeB.

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January 23, 2002

My niece lost her husband Paul W. Jurgens at the WTC. I wanted to be able to wear a bracelet because I feel that someway by wearing it, we will find Paul.

Gina L.

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January 20, 2002

I ordered a bracelet with the name Sean P. Tallon, a firefighter who died at the WTC. I live in Battery Park City, just across West St. from the WTC, and Sean was a member of Latter 10, who shared space in our local firehouse with Engine 10. In the short month that I lived in BPC prior to the attacks, I became acquainted with Sean on my daily walks past his firehouse to the WTC to get my subway uptown to school. I was so shocked to see his picture among the missing firemen in the NY Times that week, and I have been determined to keep his memory alive. This bracelet is thus fare the best way I can image of doing so. Thank you for doing this...it means so much to literally be able to keep Sean's memory with me all day long.

Beth K.

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January 19, 2002

I ordered this bracelet with Father Mychal Judge's name on it because he is an amazing person to me. I've read everything about him that I can find and strive to be more like him everyday. I wanted his name on my bracelet to remind me that I have a lot to be thankful for and a lot to live up to. I got a chance to continue on Earth, to watch my child grow up, love my husband and to hug my friends and I need to remember those who didn't and take advantage of more moments in my life. Thanks for making these bracelets, they help us remember and honor those people who have lost so much.

Kristen

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January 17, 2002

I bought the bracelet because my cousin Lt. Robert Regan of Ladder 118 FDNY died in the WTC Tragedy and I want everyone to know that I knew one of the Greatest Heros of all time. Although I am so sad I am so proud of him. I want to support Bobby and My cousins Donna, Caitlin, and Brendan. I hope that wearing my bracelet will give me strength in the times I might need it in the future. I also want to support the Orphans Fund in any way possible.

Debbie

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January 16, 2002

My family lost a wonderful young man on 9/11. (His brother is married to my sister) Eddie Oliver left behind a young wife and a daughter 2 years and a son 4 months old. As a mater of fact, they had just christened their son 2 days before the tragedy. His family and mine are truly heartbroken from the loss, but having these bracelets somehow keeps his memory alive.

Elaine

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January 14, 2002

My 22 y/o son Paul J. Battaglia was killed on 9/11. The bracelets are for myself and his fiancee. Unfortunately he never got a chance to marry and have children. He loved his job in the twin towers and loved his life so much. When I was in H.S. I wore a POW bracelet. Now I'll wear one for my son.

Corinna

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January 12, 2002

I live in Pennsylvania. Which kind of was right between the events of September 11, 2001. To the north of us, the towers were being attached. To the south of us, the Pentagon was hit. And what seemed to be right next door, when in distance it was probably 165 miles to the west of Lancaster County, the United Airlines flight 93 crashed after a very heroic attempt by several passengers to take the plane back from the terrorist.

To this day, I truly believe those heroic individuals of Flight 93 saved my life. You see, I live within a five mile radius of the Three Mile Island Nuclear plant. Many people here believe that the plane was directed to come to the Nuclear Plant to complete the final path of destruction from New York to Washington DC. If indeed the plane had hit the towers, there would have been nothing to speak of from New York through Pennsylvania and down to Washington DC. That is why I requested the bracelets from Flight 93 with Todd Beamer and Tom Burnett on them. I, along with a lot of other thankful people, owe it to the true heroes of the day that were on the plane that crashed her in PA. I am 36 years old and did not want to see my life, or anyones life come to an end that morning. I will always remember the events of September 11, and I will always remember the people on Flight 93, that gave their lives so that I could continue living my life.

Corinna

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January 12, 2002

I live in Pennsylvania. Which kind of was right between the events of September 11, 2001. To the north of us, the towers were being attached. To the south of us, the Pentagon was hit. And what seemed to be right next door, when in distance it was probably 165 miles to the west of Lancaster County, the United Airlines flight 93 crashed after a very heroic attempt by several passengers to take the plane back from the terrorist.

To this day, I truly believe those heroic individuals of Flight 93 saved my life. You see, I live within a five mile radius of the Three Mile Island Nuclear plant. Many people here believe that the plane was directed to come to the Nuclear Plant to complete the final path of destruction from New York to Washington DC. If indeed the plane had hit the towers, there would have been nothing to speak of from New York through Pennsylvania and down to Washington DC. That is why I requested the bracelets from Flight 93 with Todd Beamer and Tom Burnett on them. I, along with a lot of other thankful people, owe it to the true heroes of the day that were on the plane that crashed her in PA. I am 36 years old and did not want to see my life, or anyones life come to an end that morning. I will always remember the events of September 11, and I will always remember the people on Flight 93, that gave their lives so that I could continue living my life.

llnut60

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January 10, 2002

Lt. Robert Cirri was my step-son's Father, who also became a friend of mine. He was a very thoughtful and caring person. I felt it was necessary to have a Memorial Bracelet with his hame on it for my Step-son, Wife and Myself.

Rachel F.

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January 10, 2002

I had Charles (Chic) Burlingame (pilot in the Pentagon crash) put on my bracelet because he graduated from Anaheim High School with me.

Bill

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January 8, 2002

The name on my bracelet is Welles R. Crowther. Wells was 24 years old. Hew was a member of the Nyack Volunteer Fire Department's Empire Hook and Ladder CO. No. 1 of Upper Nyack, New York of which I am also a member.

Wells was a securities trader working on the 107th floor/tower 2 of the World Trade Center. After the first plane struck tower 1, Welles phoned his father's workplace to let him know that hew as okay and evacuating, but had to leave him a message. He then phoned his mother's cell phone and left her the same message. Shortly after this, tower 2 was struck by the second plane. Wells has not been accounted for since.

I have been friends with the Crowther family for many years watching Welles grow from a boy to a young man. At the request of the family, I had the honor of conducting the firematic portion of the memorial service held for Welles a few weeks latter.

My thoughts and prayers are with the Welles' family.

2001

Valerie D.

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December 27, 2001

I have 3 POW/MIA bracelets. My first soldier was one of the first 3 POW's to be released back in the early 70's. My second was also released an my third, I believe, is deceased KIA. I received my Memorial Bracelets and they are beautiful. All I knew was that I wanted a fireman. I also got a bracelet for the Port Authority dog, Sirius, that was lost. It's perfect for me because I used to train service dogs and everyone thinks of me with a dog.

I alternate wearing my 2 Memorial Bracelets and once each year, usually in August around POW/MIA day, I wear all of my POW/MIA bracelets. I just want to honor the common man who has made such uncommon sacrifices in his/her life so that I can have a life of freedom and joy.

Bubba

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December 22, 2001

The reason I purchased a VOT Memorial Bracelet is that I lost 2 family members on September 11, 2001. Their laughs will never been heard again, their smiles are gone except for what is in our minds, and their warmth will no longer be felt. It is in the bracelet that their memory will be carried.

There is not closure in an empty casket, a shovel full of dirt just isn't the same. They went with such horrific pain and sorrow around them. My prayers is that they went fast without sufferage. They were always loved and will always be in our minds. When I saw your bracelet offered it was the nicest on seen on the net. I will wear it proudly until the terrorists are caught and prossucated. May their memories live forever and love never be forgotten. United we stand and cannot forget that. We shall all stick together through this hard time and we will succeed.

Amy S.

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December 18, 2001

As a service person myself, a teacher, I have been able to touch lives in many ways. My bracelet that I purchased, in honor and respect for my "lost" friend, Montgomery Hord serves not only as a wearable memorial, but a unique piece for a "teaching tool."

It is assuring to know that all will benefit from the monies. This tragic event touched us all, even in small town, Nebraska. God Bless You and God Bless America. United We Stand!

Annmarie V.

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December 16, 2001

My first cousin, Brian Cannizzaro, was a fireman in Ladder 101 in Redhook, Brooklyn. He was 30 years old and left behind a beautiful wife, Jackie, and a one-year-old son, Christopher. Brian was supposed to be off on Sept. 11, but he was remodeling a house for his family and he thought that he could use the overtime. Brian died with six other members of Ladder 101. His body was recovered on November 11, 2001 and his family misses him a great deal. Brian is survived by his parents, two brothers and their wives as well as his son, wife and many, many heartbroken aunts, uncles, cousins and friends.

Bob J.

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December 11, 2001

When I got my bracelet I was surprised by the emotional impact it had when I put it on. It became one of those sacred things that I don't take off. During the Viet Nam war we wore bracelets with POW or MIA names on them. I wore my until the name on my bracelet was found and returned safely to the states. While I hated the war and was profoundly against it, I respected those who served and protected me.

Not I find myself at the beginning of a whole new fresh century that has not started out really great for any of us. Again I find myself wearing yet another bracelet of another hero, but this time he won't be found alive. I guess I'll have to wear this one a bit longer.

My dilemma is that I wear the name of a FDNY hero whom I know nothing about. Just a name. Is there anyway I can find out something about him, an address to send condolences to his family or a Christmas card. If I am going to wear this bracelet for a long time to come, I want to know about the man who I essentially watched perish in September. I would like to honor him by knowing about him and what he stood for. His name was/is Thomas Foley.

Patricia S.

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December 5, 2001

I ordered a custom Memorial Bracelet for my husband Dave Scales to reflect his posthumous promotion to full Colonel and his DC area of residence verses his birthplace of Cleveland. Some may wear their bracelet for only a little while, some longer , but for those of us who lost very special people in our lives, it is a forever thing.

Carrie K.

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June 27, 2001

Richard Torress, was Kerry Scott's LT. He also died in the HumV that day with Kerry Scott. He was a good guy, loved the Yankees and is buried in a cemetery overlooking the sky line of his favorite city, New York. His wife had their baby shortly after his passing.